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Buried Soldiers May Be Victims of Ancient Chemical Weapon

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posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 12:08 PM
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www.livescience.com... These 20 men, who died in A.D. 256, may be the first victims of chemical warfare to leave any archeological evidence of their passing, according to a new investigation. The case is a cold one, with little physical evidence left behind beyond drawings and archaeological excavation notes from the 1930s. But a new analysis of those materials published in January in the American Journal of Archaeology finds that the soldiers likely did not die by the sword as the original excavator believed. Instead, they were gassed.






Some very interesting research coming out of the American Journal of Archaeology these days. I've heard of throwing plague bodies over city walls and Molotov Cocktail like grenades, but this takes the cake.



www.sciencedaily.com...
Diagram showing the Sasanian Persian mine designed to collapse Dura’s city wall and adjacent tower, the Roman countermine intended to stop them, and the probable location of the inferred Persian smoke-generator thought to have filled the Roman gallery with deadly fumes. The Persians may have used bellows, but a natural chimney effect may also have helped generate the poisonous cloud. (Credit: Image copyright Simon James)




posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 12:15 PM
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Interesting story OP.

I fear we must keep this info from TPTB, as the headlines tomorrow will most likely read

WMD'S FOUND IN SYRIA, US & ISRAEL PREPARING SHOCK & AWE CAMPAIGN IN RESPONSE



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 01:06 PM
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People never seem to change do they


Interesting find OP S&F



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 01:24 PM
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Great information that you found! Especially interesting is the Greek's method of heating sand in shields and then catapulting the red-hot granules onto Alexander the Great's army. Ouch!



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 02:38 PM
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reply to post by Erica1631
 


Can't forget Hannibal's pots of snakes or Roman bee and hornet nests, both of which would be catapulted at the enemy



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