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The presidential election might not be that close after all

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posted on Jul, 18 2004 @ 07:03 PM
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Any thoughts on how many “republicans” will actually vote for Kerry? The more I talk to republican centrists, the more I realize many are afraid to publicly discuss their displeasure for President Bush. Anyone get the same sense? WHat might that mean election time?




posted on Jul, 19 2004 @ 12:13 PM
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Hmm, I get the impression the other way... Dems who voted Gore in 2000, and are now saying they wouldn't vote for Kerry. So who knows I guess.



posted on Jul, 19 2004 @ 12:26 PM
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I think you could be right loam. I have some VERY Republican friends, including one who's planning to run for office, and they all are going to swallow their distaste and vote for Kerry just to get Bush out of office. They think that Bush is "runing the Republican party" because of his fiscal policy and his "pandering" to the religious right. Their words not mine. They want Kerry to win just to get the Bush admin out then have McCain or someone run in 2008 to get rid of Kerry.

On the other hand alot of dems may not like Kerry (including myself), but want Bush out so badly they'll vote for anyone who looks like they stand a chance.


I personally believe Bush is going to win no matter what....even if it looks like he won't. There'll be something that lets him pull of a victory, whether it be another terruh attack, pulling bin Laden out of a hole somewhere, or e-voting problems. So, I've consigned myself to another 4 years of George Bush. I've even been making bets with all my republican acquintances who think Bush is as good as beat. Ha...fools.



posted on Jul, 19 2004 @ 12:33 PM
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I can't vote yet, but if I could I don't know who I would vote for. Bush has started a neverending war but I really don't like Kerry. Guess I would vote for Bush cause he's from Texas like me
.

Flinx, I had to put my hand over your avatar to read your post. Those eyes are really distracting



posted on Jul, 19 2004 @ 12:39 PM
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Originally posted by RogueX
I can't vote yet, but if I could I don't know who I would vote for. Bush has started a neverending war but I really don't like Kerry. Guess I would vote for Bush cause he's from Texas like me
.

Flinx, I had to put my hand over your avatar to read your post. Those eyes are really distracting


Hey, I'm from Texas too, but I think that's a reason NOT to vote for Bush! Not to get too Dixie Chicks here, but I think he gives us a bad name. I don't have an accent, and I'm not a damn cowboy!


And yes, The Ashcroft sees all. He even sees what you do when you're all alone....



posted on Jul, 19 2004 @ 01:08 PM
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I honestly think that a lot of Republicans are just going to stay home this election. They don't like Bush, but don't want to vote Dem, so they just won't vote.

It'll turn out well for Kerry, and possibly turn the senate. I really don't think Bush realizes how many people he's alienated durring these past four years.

It'll be interesting to see how it pans out.

May Peace Travel With You
~Astral



posted on Jul, 19 2004 @ 03:14 PM
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Astral City, you may be right. If there are Republicans actually considering voting for Kerry, that suggests boat loads more who will not vote at all. We may see Republican turnout the lowest in years.


[edit on 19-7-2004 by loam]



posted on Jul, 19 2004 @ 03:36 PM
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During all this time I have kept predictions to myself but I am going to say this I have the feeling that the elections are going to be by such a majority on Kerry side that bush is not going to be able to see what hit him, I see people that never voted before for neither parties voting for the first time, and women are going to be voting this year more than in previous one regardless of husband parties affiliations.



posted on Jul, 19 2004 @ 04:11 PM
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Originally posted by loam
Any thoughts on how many “republicans” will actually vote for Kerry? The more I talk to republican centrists, the more I realize many are afraid to publicly discuss their displeasure for President Bush. Anyone get the same sense? WHat might that mean election time?


I wrote an op/ed, speaking as a conservative, criticizing this insanely dangerous administration and their war policy. You would not believe the reaction I got from Republicans. It was IMMENSE. It took a week, at least, to get through all the correspondence.

The vast majority of the right-leaning respondents were in full agreement! And you are correct in your assumption. Many good Republicans are very afraid to speak out and buck the party.

It's time for all right-minded, reasonable Republicans to make their voices heard! This administration has to go!



posted on Jul, 19 2004 @ 04:16 PM
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FLINX - I have a friend who lives in Houston, and I told her... I feel for you Texans... and the image Shrub is giving you...



posted on Jul, 19 2004 @ 04:20 PM
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I'm a die-hard republican that will not be voting this election.

I would vote for Kerry if I was in a swing state, but since I live in a consistantly Dem state I get the luxury of not voting for Kerry yet still having my state go to him.

I do not like Kerry.
But at this point I'd vote for a well trained mouse over Bush.

I did vote for Bush in 2000. And based on everything I knew then i stand by that. I have no problem with greed and big business. I however will not stand for things like the Patriot Act and the War in Iraq.

Bush isn't even a republican in my opinion he is...beyond words.



posted on Jul, 19 2004 @ 04:24 PM
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History doesn't support the theory that two elections in a row could be close, and certainly the likelihood of a repeat of 2000 is a mathematical improbability.

I believe I'm attuned to current events more than most. My estimation, and this has nothing to do with political preference, is that Bush will win handily in November, regardless of the closeness now in the polls.

This reasoning is based upon several factors but the two major bases are (1) that Senators Kerry and Edwards are far more liberal than the country as an entirety, however well they may do in Massachusetts and NYC. ; and (2) The US public, many of whom cannot even name the current vice-president or secretary of state, will not be focused on the presidential election until after the Democratic and Republican conventions are over.

At the moment, polls indicate that most citizens know virtually nothing about the Democratic nominee. Several secrets about Senator Kerry will not come to light until the press lasers in on the candidates as the election nears. His votes will be seen in the South as outside the mainstream (example: Sen. Edwards, who is slightly less liberal than Sen. Kerry, is from North Carolina; Kerry-Edwards - where Edwards is well known - are 15 points behind Bush Cheney in todays' poll.)

Sen Kerry is alleged to have had a mistress who was paid off to move to Africa and allegedly still receiving money from someone for support. His voting record will be all over commercials within two months. A non-partisan Bible Code website recently posted an alleged finding, "Senator Kerry (will) exxagerate Vietnam" (presumably related to his Senate testimony that soldiers were killing women and children en masse.).

So hold your bets on a close election. Nothing in the past supports that, but there's always may be a first time, however unlikely.



posted on Jul, 19 2004 @ 04:26 PM
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I voted for Bush in 2000. Never again! His bunch of NeoConservative thugs come from the Trotskyite left. They are not conservatives or Republicans! They are traitorous leeches filled with blood lust.

I do not advocate for John Kerry. As a matter of fact, I may sit the election out. But then again, my state could very much be in play... so.. I havn't decided what I'll do. The choices we've been given are disgusting.



posted on Jul, 19 2004 @ 04:29 PM
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Sorry I can not just sit the election this year I have to go and vote this president out.

[Edited on 19-7-2004 by marg6043]



posted on Jul, 19 2004 @ 04:39 PM
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I have serious issues with Kerry and because of that, I don't know if I could, in good conscience vote for him. He voted to give Bush the right to invade Iraq. His running mate did, too. If I knew back then all the intelligence was Bu#, they had to have known. Neither of them wanted to come off as weak. I despise that weakness.


Give me Howard Dean anyday - sayin' it like it is. Scream or no scream. He's got balls.

Kerry plans to basically continue this disasterous Iraq policy. Nothing he's suggested is all that far off from Bush's BS. Oh yeah - and he wants to expand the number of Special operations forces (black ops). That's all we need. More spooks out there running their little free-lance gigs and posing as Al-CIAda - so we'll have our external threat.

I want to vote Bush out of office. I don't ever want to be sorry (like this) again, though, for voting a monster into office.



posted on Jul, 19 2004 @ 05:14 PM
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The main thing is that the Republican party and its candidates represented Conservative ideas and values, while the Democratic party represented Liberal ideas and values. It can clearly be seen by Bush's term in office that that is not the case now. Many conservatives, including myself, are angered at the Republican party and Bush himself.

Kerry will destroy Bush because he has his liberal base energized. Bush cannot energize his conservative base because HE ISN'T conservative.



posted on Jul, 19 2004 @ 09:36 PM
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After 2012:

I’m not certain I agree with you. The dynamics of this election appear not to be too dissimilar from previous anti-incumbent elections. There is far more anti-Bush sentiment, than pro-Kerry sentiment. When members of your own party throw in the towel, you can pretty much give it up.

Lockheed:

I am consistently hearing the theme that Bush is not a conservative. Unprecedented government spending and government intrusion were the hallmarks of liberals. That now appears to be turned on its head. More importantly, I’m left with the impression that the real damage comes from a fundamental failure to address the needs of *small* business. I know a lot of hard working business owners who feel that the focus on *large* business has frozen them out. Piss these small business guys off, and I think you’re in real trouble during election time.



posted on Jul, 20 2004 @ 07:45 AM
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l also don't believe on the conservative vs. liberal bs, I care about what is going on in the country and the way our politics is playing on our foreign affairs, I see the deterioration of this nation and the economy and I am also aware of what is going on around my city and the community and it is not pretty since this president came to power, or should I said took power.



posted on Jul, 20 2004 @ 07:57 AM
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Bush may have come into office as a conservative; but his administration has been anything but. He makes the "big-spending liberals" look stingy. He has overseen the largest expansion of government in our nation's history. True conservatives should be railing against this. And that's just one aspect of this wretched term.

The Chickenhawks he has surrounded him with are not conservative, either. Not by any stretch. Their genesis started with the Trotskyite left. All Bush supporters should do some research into that. I'm sure they'd quickly realize how abhorant this bunch is.



posted on Jul, 21 2004 @ 08:29 AM
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I would say the democrats are quite energized. Another interesting dynamic in this election.

www.washingtonpost.com...

(Use www.bugmenot.com... if you need a logon)

And more to the point of a shrinking republican base... Loosing the support of miltary communities can't help.

www.washingtonpost.com...


[edit on 21-7-2004 by loam]




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