It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Thinking of Joining the Masons

page: 1
0
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 07:10 PM
link   
I'm sure the Masons are great for some, and less great for others... tell me what you think. I will make up my own mind in the end, I just want to hear some pros and cons, thanks.

Someone wants to sponsor me in a local Masonic lodge, the questions are the following...

1. If I don't go to the weekly meetings, will I be considered a bad or lazy Mason?

2. There are mostly old people I heard, will my age affect how I progress there?

3. If I join, will they ever ask to see any documentation such as my birth certificate, drivers license etc?

Serious answers preferred, thanks.




posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 07:28 PM
link   
Good questions, I only think that you been here at ATS for that long and not be one makes me think why now.



posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 07:30 PM
link   
I think you should join , I would if I could afford it , the free masons are a great organization to join , they are not evil devil worshipers like conspiracy theorist think they are . They are good heart-ted God fearing folks. . . . The people who make outlandish claims about them are the ones who couldn't get into their club , so they say a bunch of bad sh!t about them.



posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 07:34 PM
link   
reply to post by Razimus
 


1st: If you join i would at least invest some time for at least two years to learn the craft, enjoy fellowship,and possibly a leadership role. If someone thinks highly enough of you to sponsor you, you should in turn give him and the lodge the respect so it doesn't make you or him look bad.

2nd: No. Your age will not hinder you. In fact, it may help because they are trying pass on their knowledge, a lot of which are leadership qualities, to younger generations to carry on. There are a lot of older people but they are full of knowledge and because it is ritualistic you must learn from others and not from books.

3rd: To the best of my knowledge they do not ask for any of that information.

For me it has been nothing but a positive experience as it has greatly helped me in public speaking and in leadership roles that I have held throughout my career as well as the art of listening and learning. There is a network of friends World wide whom you haven't even met yet but would give you the shirt off their back.

Hope this helps.



posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 07:41 PM
link   
reply to post by Razimus
 

I was in a club like the masons and it sucked. Nobody payed attention to any of the rules. they all talked crap about each other. Their meetings bored the life right out of me as there was always one person who didn't get something or wanted something they couldn't get. It was like the elks lodge. I say go for it and hope its different then my experience.



posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 07:54 PM
link   
reply to post by Razimus
 


If you meet the requirements and have interest in the fraternity then go for it. I did a couple years ago and my best friend did as well. We've had a blast. I'm a 32º Scottish Rite mason now and he's applying for the degrees as well.



posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 08:59 PM
link   
Topic creator, might I suggest you read the posting guidelines for this forum.

www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Feb, 11 2011 @ 11:43 PM
link   
reply to post by Razimus
 


A lot of your questions really depend on the situation on your lodge. I've found during my time as a mason that every lodge tends to have it's own unique 'personality' and I imagine the small differences I find in my district would pale in comparison to the differences in regions, counties, and continents. That being said...

1. At my home lodge it's generally frowned upon if you don't at least attempt to go to the weekly practice meetings, even more so if you are in a leadership position. Not attending won't get you in trouble or anything though, at least not around here, but your attendance can have a big impact if you decide you ever want to go through all the chairs of the lodge.

2. That's really up to the judgment of your investigating committee. I still consider myself pretty young and my investigators were much older gentlemen and I was allowed in, so being young won't hurt your chances, quite the opposite in fact since most lodges are really hurting for younger members. This really depends on your situation though, there are lots of grumpy old men that'll blackball a young guy just for the heck of it. If that happens don't let that discourage you from trying again a year later though.

3. They never had to see anything for me. I think the investigative forms used to ask for your SSN but that's been done away with to my knowledge since we didn't actually use the SSN or anything and having that kind of info sort of creates a liability for the lodge.

Hope this info helps.



posted on Feb, 12 2011 @ 07:33 AM
link   
reply to post by Razimus
 

1. You go when you are able to. You will get out what you put in.

2. There are quite a few old members, but the average age is dropping as younger people are joining. Your age will not hinder you. I joined when I was 21 and by 24 I was sitting as Master of the Lodge and by 25 I was High Priest of the Royal Arch Masons.

3. No. They don't care about birth certificates or drivers license for members. The only time my drivers license came into play was when I needed to get added to the bank account and the bank needed my ID.



posted on Feb, 12 2011 @ 08:01 PM
link   
I have been thinking about joining as well. My fathers father is a mason, only we all had a falling out about 16+ years ago. I need to track him down and have a good conversation with him. It seems like a club to gain knowledge, morals, other skills, and possibly many business connections. Im Ready.



posted on Feb, 13 2011 @ 12:21 PM
link   
reply to post by Razimus
 




1. If I don't go to the weekly meetings, will I be considered a bad or lazy Mason?


You'll be forgotten by the Masons.. and considered a "ring mason" .. a Mason who joins, buys a ring, says he's a Mason but doesn't act like one. Unless you have a viable excuse, your not being accused of being lazy.. you are being lazy.



2. There are mostly old people I heard, will my age affect how I progress there?


Depends on the Lodge. The lodge I was raised in average age was maybe 50. The one I'm currently at is 29-30 average



3. If I join, will they ever ask to see any documentation such as my birth certificate, drivers license etc?


Enough information for a local police background check. Address, and SS mainly.



posted on Feb, 14 2011 @ 07:51 AM
link   

Originally posted by sirhc0329
I have been thinking about joining as well. My fathers father is a mason, only we all had a falling out about 16+ years ago. I need to track him down and have a good conversation with him. It seems like a club to gain knowledge, morals, other skills, and possibly many business connections. Im Ready.


I hope you do re-connect with him. Life is too short to hold grudges. Second chances are rare. Good luck.



posted on Feb, 14 2011 @ 07:58 AM
link   

Originally posted by Razimus


1. If I don't go to the weekly meetings, will I be considered a bad or lazy Mason?

one of the first things you are told is that masonry should not be put in front of your family, your job, or your faith. So nobody is going to give you a hard time for missing some meetings. But in joining, you need to make an effort to put what time you can spare into it. Otherwise, joining would be pointless. Once you realize what it is, you will see that masonry is all about others and how strong you can make yourself by helping others.


2. There are mostly old people I heard, will my age affect how I progress there?

ages vary in most lodges. Find one that has a good mix or more people your age. The old guys are fun to talk to. You can learn lots from them. And the stories, they are better than any movie. You will make friends with all of them.


3. If I join, will they ever ask to see any documentation such as my birth certificate, drivers license etc?

Serious answers preferred, thanks.


Just name, SSN, and the usual stuff.

Good luck in your decision.



posted on Feb, 14 2011 @ 08:01 AM
link   

Originally posted by Razimus
I'm sure the Masons are great for some, and less great for others... tell me what you think. I will make up my own mind in the end, I just want to hear some pros and cons, thanks.

Someone wants to sponsor me in a local Masonic lodge, the questions are the following...

1. If I don't go to the weekly meetings, will I be considered a bad or lazy Mason?

Not after you progress through the degrees, some members attend once per year, and are still loved and welcomed. However, you should plan to invest some time for the first 6 months to learn your catechisms and meet your brothers. Probably one or two nights per week for those first few months, and then one night per month after that.


2. There are mostly old people I heard, will my age affect how I progress there?

All the more reason for young guys to join! My lodge was 100% old guys when I joined, now a few years later, we are full of young guys, and everyone is thrilled. Old guys are mentors, young guys are the future. Old guys eventually die, don't let the craft die with them.


3. If I join, will they ever ask to see any documentation such as my birth certificate, drivers license etc?

I don't think so, but you will get a "dues" card, and if you are visiting other lodges, you might be asked for your dues card. You also have to answer a questionairre on your application that basically has your name, address, family situation, job situation, and asks if you have ever attempted to overthrow the government.

It is a wonderful experience, if you go into it for the right reasons. Masonry is all about living a harmonious life with your brothers, keeping everything in moderation, learning to be responsible and friendly. If you go into it with the purpose of meeting people, listening, learning, and offering your own experiences and advice as a mentor, then you will be extremely successful and happy. If you go into it expecting someone else to "teach" you, or expecting some cosmic secrets, then you will be disappointed. You get out, what you put in.



posted on Feb, 18 2011 @ 09:28 PM
link   

Originally posted by Razimus
I'm sure the Masons are great for some, and less great for others... tell me what you think. I will make up my own mind in the end, I just want to hear some pros and cons, thanks.

Someone wants to sponsor me in a local Masonic lodge, the questions are the following...

1. If I don't go to the weekly meetings, will I be considered a bad or lazy Mason?

2. There are mostly old people I heard, will my age affect how I progress there?

3. If I join, will they ever ask to see any documentation such as my birth certificate, drivers license etc?

Serious answers preferred, thanks.


1. No, there was a time when I didn't go for almost a year due to a health scare, but I was still welcomed back, they say you need to put your personal life first before the Brotherhood

2. in the USA, we are seing an increase in younger Brothers, usually between 20 and 30, but it'a still alot of older members

3. and the answer to this question is...No lol



posted on Feb, 18 2011 @ 11:05 PM
link   
I also was considering looking in to joining the masons/freemasons but I have a different question, its probabilly pretty unique. Ive heard that things you learn or undertake in while your in the masons/freemasons are very secret and you cant really tell any outsiders about these things, so heres my problem.

I'm a T.I (targetted individual) thats a victim of being implanted and mind control and voices being thrust upon me (dont worry its not schizophrenia) so if I was to join I would be bringing the perpatrators of these nasty things with me, they would be learning what I do. Would this effectivly stop me being able to join the masons/freemasons. The guys who run the mind control dont talk but it might effect things.

If you belive me and know what to do would you still try to join the masons/freemasons. I would very much appreciate any help on this matter. Thanks for your time...

Kevin..



posted on Feb, 19 2011 @ 09:05 AM
link   
reply to post by KevOF
 


I would say it would be better if you didn't even bother petitioning. If you did petition, and you got to know the guys in that lodge, and you told them what you've said here, they'd be honorbound to deny your petition anyway. So I'd save yourself the trouble and the initiation fees and just not bother with it. Masonry wouldn't be a good fit for you.



posted on Feb, 19 2011 @ 11:37 AM
link   

Originally posted by TheForgottenOnes

1. No, there was a time when I didn't go for almost a year due to a health scare, but I was still welcomed back, they say you need to put your personal life first before the Brotherhood


Just to add to TFO's point, whether I'm on an Investigating Committee or helping a new Initiate with his memory work, I make sure that they know that work, family and faith are all to be attended to before worrying about attending Lodge. To do anything else is to be putting the cart before the horse.



posted on Feb, 19 2011 @ 11:57 AM
link   
Ask a Mason, is the best place to start. Go to a Lodge open house and express your interest. Brothers are very welcoming people with good hearts. I'm also sure you will love the perks of being a belly mason. Right Brothers?

Fraternally Yours,

-Matt



posted on Feb, 19 2011 @ 12:06 PM
link   
reply to post by Razimus
 


I think you have to be related to one to join, not sure. Someone in my school district has a bumper sticker that reads 2B1 ask1 with the scale or logo in the center. My great grandmother belonged to Order of the Eastern Star. It is like a branch where women can join and I am pretty sure she had to have a relative who was a mason. It was never spoken of but, she dressed very nice and went to meetings and participated in a lot of community charity from what I could observe. I was young though 6-10 years of age so I really didn't pay much attention. My great grandfather never attended these or her Loyal Order of Moose fuctions. Good Luck in your query.



new topics

top topics



 
0
<<   2 >>

log in

join