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DoD - Dictionary Of Military Terms. Understanding Coded Language.

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posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 11:10 PM
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First I would like to give credit to lordtypO as this book was in a thread that he made about banned books. www.abovetopsecret.com...

I found one that was very interesting called Dictionary of Military Terms, this book has words and definitions that military personnel use, that a laymen may otherwise not comprehend its full definition. Due to the recent Dugway Base incident, many things were shared in the main stream media that may have been ignored by people due to its insignificance. But in fact can be very important codes that are being relayed, that only some can understand, in order to get "regular" people off the trail.

This book can be used to possibly decipher many incidents of the past and present to awaken the stories that were hidden, or buried due to hitting a "dead end". I will continue to look through threads, and stories that I otherwise thought were "getting" no where and use the information presented in the book, that may tell a completely different story.

I would like others to do the same, I think this can open and entirely new world to how we view and interpret important stories. Thanks.

DoD Dictionary of Military Terms.
prernalal.com.nyud.net...

Peace, NRE.




posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 11:29 PM
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reply to post by NoRegretsEver
 


Would you care to post a few items of interest from the book?

I have tried to download it, but it is either really busy or being shut down.



posted on Jan, 29 2011 @ 11:55 PM
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The book is quite lengthy, but I will post some of the acronyms in no order, just to show some of the book.
BTW, many of us are fully aware that keeping us in the dark, and using terms that we wouldn't otherwise understand is a great way for us to overlook things.

Those FOIA documents, the 9-11 Commission reports are impossible to sit through, because they know that we wont know whats going on.


CC&D- camouflage, concealment, and deception

CHOP -change of operational control

COLDS- cargo offload and discharge system

DOB- date of birth; dispersal operating base ( 2 definitions)

EARLY- evasion and recovery supplemental data report

FAD -feasible arrival date; force activity designator (2 definitions)

FLIP- flight information publication; flight instruction procedures (2 definitions)


There are hundreds of pages of this info, with full definitions, I wanted to display just a few that if we heard them we would think the opposite, but those that have the right "ears" would know exactly what was going on.

Peace, NRE.



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 12:15 AM
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reply to post by myster0
 


it did the same with me,at first it seemed as if was not going to load,try it again and hit refresh.
thats what i did and it loaded fine



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 12:20 AM
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Hey cool

Adding to my library of terms



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 12:42 AM
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Originally posted by NoRegretsEver
The book is quite lengthy, but I will post some of the acronyms in no order, just to show some of the book.
BTW, many of us are fully aware that keeping us in the dark, and using terms that we wouldn't otherwise understand is a great way for us to overlook things.

Those FOIA documents, the 9-11 Commission reports are impossible to sit through, because they know that we wont know whats going on.


CC&D- camouflage, concealment, and deception

CHOP -change of operational control

COLDS- cargo offload and discharge system

DOB- date of birth; dispersal operating base ( 2 definitions)

EARLY- evasion and recovery supplemental data report

FAD -feasible arrival date; force activity designator (2 definitions)

FLIP- flight information publication; flight instruction procedures (2 definitions)


There are hundreds of pages of this info, with full definitions, I wanted to display just a few that if we heard them we would think the opposite, but those that have the right "ears" would know exactly what was going on.

Peace, NRE.



Just imagine walking in on a conversation that seems completely irrelevant like "I woke up "early", because I had to "chop, and "flip" the eggs, that are now a "fad" in many countries to cure "colds", that happened around my "dob".

I know it sounds stupid, but take the definitions that I placed above, you have a completely different conversation, that you were fully unaware of.

Peace, NRE.



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 01:23 AM
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I wanted to "bump" this before I left, as I do not want it to get buried. IMHO this is important information concerning most things that are discussed on ATS, and can help with many of the hurdles that we are constantly faced with due, to "misunderstanding", or "misinterpreting" information that is to be otherwise hidden from mainstream society.
Peace, NRE.



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 01:44 AM
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an other good find, very useful when reading mil manuals,S$F for your find and thread op. We need more of this type of threads.



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 02:07 AM
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reply to post by bekod
 


Thank you, and those that have participated. This is going to be a game changer in my eyes.
Peace, NRE.



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 03:07 AM
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Sorry, but that isn't coded language, but rather just military jargon or dialect. When I was in the USAF I was a crew chief . In the USN dialect that would called a plane captain. I would frequently be off TDY from my PDS. Sometimes the TDY would turn into a PCS for some.

Every morning, we'd do a FOD walk, then make sure the LOX was topped off, then connect the APU to the a/c. One of the things no one wanted on their form 35 was a cert for the mule, cause then you'd get stuck with running it.

One of the scarier things to do was taking the safeties off the aux air doors...more than one mech got a nasty Phanthom bite from them, a few lost fingers or more.

Pretty much every field has its own jargon that appears to be a coded language impenetrable by the ignorant, but it actually is just a shorthand designed for clear and fast communication.



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 03:11 AM
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Originally posted by apacheman
Sorry, but that isn't coded language, but rather just military jargon or dialect. When I was in the USAF I was a crew chief . In the USN dialect that would called a plane captain. I would frequently be off TDY from my PDS. Sometimes the TDY would turn into a PCS for some.

Every morning, we'd do a FOD walk, then make sure the LOX was topped off, then connect the APU to the a/c. One of the things no one wanted on their form 35 was a cert for the mule, cause then you'd get stuck with running it.

One of the scarier things to do was taking the safeties off the aux air doors...more than one mech got a nasty Phanthom bite from them, a few lost fingers or more.

Pretty much every field has its own jargon that appears to be a coded language impenetrable by the ignorant, but it actually is just a shorthand designed for clear and fast communication.


Oh I hope you meant this as a joke. It was quite hilarious that you wanted to prove that the ABC's of the business had nothing to do with the "reg" people. Thanks.
Peace, NRE.



posted on Jan, 30 2011 @ 03:20 AM
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I first realized this new language of codes when deciphering information in a Rand website which was instruction being put in place to give emergency flu vaccines a couple of years ago. I ran across terms like POD (point of dispensing) and acronyms that defined specific terms of populations and target areas. Sometimes the information is written in so much code it is impossible to understand without knowing these acronyms.

It is very similar in concept to the deception of the language of Legalese.

Thanks for posting this information.



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 09:55 AM
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I thought I might give this a morning bump, as this is very good information to have on hand.

Peace,NRE.



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 12:09 PM
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reply to post by NoRegretsEver
 


While humorous, all the terms are genuine shorthand.

TDY: temporary duty

PDS: Permanent duty station

PCS: permanent change of station

FOD: foreign object damage, FOD walk meant to walk the flightline picking up anything and everything that a jet engine might ingest

LOX: liquid oxygen

APU: auxiliary power unit

Aux air doors: Auxiliary air doors: two 1.5'X2' doors on the belly of an F-4 that snapped shut in a fraction of a second when the power was cycled from the APU to internal aircraft (a/c) power. Poor communications between aircrew and groundcrew could result in severe injuries to the groundcrew.

Phantom bites: minor and major injuries resulting from any of the sharp edges, projections and other dangers working around fighters entailed.

Form 35: a card that listed all the equipment you were certified to operate.

Mule: A large, complicated, and messy piece of equipment that provided hydraulic power to an a/c, universally hated and avoided by crewchiefs.

Jargon serves a very useful purpose when well-constructed: huge amounts of information can be conveyed accurately and quickly in noisy and stressful environments.

So enjoy learning it and try to understand no one is trying to hide anything from you with it, anymore than a speaker of a foreign language is. Once you learn it, it is just another way to communicate within a specific field.

I would have nearly as hard a time understanding the Army dialect as a civilian; while similar to the USAF dialect, it has its own formulations and rules designed for a much different environment and need, hence the requirement for a USAF translator on the ground to coordinate with army units to avoid friendly fire incidents.



posted on Jan, 31 2011 @ 01:08 PM
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Originally posted by apacheman
Jargon serves a very useful purpose when well-constructed: huge amounts of information can be conveyed accurately and quickly....

So enjoy learning it and try to understand no one is trying to hide anything from you with it.....

Once you learn it, it is just another way to communicate within a specific field.....



Exactly

I built my first PC a 386DX CPU with OB MCP on the 40MHz MOBO & 8mb V-RAM PCI VGA Matrox Mystique GPU displayed on my 14" CRT & 3.5 Gig HD. My next one was a P-III 933 MHz Socket 370 CPU with 133 MHz FSB also PC-512Mb SDRAM and 128MB ATI GPU on the MOBOs AGP [Considered an NVIDIA GF] also VGA displayed on SONY 21" FD Trinitron CRT with .24 DP



ETA: YAT-YAS 1833

edit on 31-1-2011 by SLAYER69 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 1 2011 @ 10:06 AM
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Originally posted by apacheman
reply to post by NoRegretsEver
 


While humorous, all the terms are genuine shorthand.

TDY: temporary duty

PDS: Permanent duty station

PCS: permanent change of station

FOD: foreign object damage, FOD walk meant to walk the flightline picking up anything and everything that a jet engine might ingest

LOX: liquid oxygen

APU: auxiliary power unit

Aux air doors: Auxiliary air doors: two 1.5'X2' doors on the belly of an F-4 that snapped shut in a fraction of a second when the power was cycled from the APU to internal aircraft (a/c) power. Poor communications between aircrew and groundcrew could result in severe injuries to the groundcrew.

Phantom bites: minor and major injuries resulting from any of the sharp edges, projections and other dangers working around fighters entailed.

Form 35: a card that listed all the equipment you were certified to operate.

Mule: A large, complicated, and messy piece of equipment that provided hydraulic power to an a/c, universally hated and avoided by crewchiefs.

Jargon serves a very useful purpose when well-constructed: huge amounts of information can be conveyed accurately and quickly in noisy and stressful environments.

So enjoy learning it and try to understand no one is trying to hide anything from you with it, anymore than a speaker of a foreign language is. Once you learn it, it is just another way to communicate within a specific field.

I would have nearly as hard a time understanding the Army dialect as a civilian; while similar to the USAF dialect, it has its own formulations and rules designed for a much different environment and need, hence the requirement for a USAF translator on the ground to coordinate with army units to avoid friendly fire incidents.






Firstly, I meant NO offense. What I was pointing out is that the same jargon that the military uses with each other, is also the jargon/shorthand that they use in press meetings and the paper. The terms that you used, of course would have been difficult for a non military person to understand, but what I was trying to point out is that there are also, words that we would normally "not" see as shorthand that is sometimes missed, when something important is unfolding. As I used in the above posts.

Peace, NRE.



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