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Why does New Jersey get away with this type of behavior?

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posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 08:06 AM
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reason.com...


I know this article is a couple weeks old but I just saw it and it makes my @#$& blood boil!!! This guy made sure to transport his weapons as the law requires them to be transported. He is not a criminal and does not have any felonies or misdemeanors. To be facing 7 years in jail for legally transporting his weapons from one home to another is absolutely disgusting. I used to spend a lot of time in Jersey for business and I always swore to myself I would rather live in hell then ever live in New Jersey. I really don't understand how a state can take away so many rights illegally and not face any consequences from voters or the Feds.




posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 08:27 AM
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reply to post by Imightknow
 


I know New Jersey law very well, as I live there and am familiar with the gun laws specifically.
I am also familiar with Evan Nappen, the attorney in the appeals case, you can see his ad on the back of just about every NJ Fish and wildlife magazine.

NJ does have just about the worse firearms laws anywhere. That being said, I am 100% on Mr. Atkins side here. I read the article and fully suspected that I would see something wrong here, other than his conviction. I am ok with his detention by the police until they got things figured out, but I feel there is no way he should have been charged. Unless there is more to the story, which I suspect there is....

Here's to hoping he gets this fixed on appeal.



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 08:53 AM
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Wow. That judge certainly has a hard on for that poor guy. I lived in NJ all my life until earlier this year. I went through the laborious process to buy a hand gun in 1994 or 1995 and it wasn't that easy back then, never mind now. I would have said I'm going to the range. Put the burden on the prosecution to prove otherwise. Christie seems to have some common sense, so hopefully a positive outcome will come out of this. I'm in GA now, and when I asked a local cop about bringing my gun from NJ and if I had to register it, etc. he said no. He said I could keep it loaded in my car, and that a concealed weapons permit was also very easy to get. I love states that are pro-2nd amendment

edit on 29-11-2010 by peter_kandra because: typo



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 02:07 PM
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Originally posted by youdidntseeme
reply to post by Imightknow
 



NJ does have just about the worse firearms laws anywhere. That being said, I am 100% on Mr. Atkins side here. I read the article and fully suspected that I would see something wrong here, other than his conviction. I am ok with his detention by the police until they got things figured out, but I feel there is no way he should have been charged. Unless there is more to the story, which I suspect there is....




I somewhat agree with you. Because it was New Jersey and their extremely harsh view on firearms I understand his detainment until they figured things out. The charges are ludicrous and just plain ignorant. No man/woman should have to serve time, let alone 7 years, for legally transporting their firearms.


The NRA should throw a fit about this as well.



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 02:12 PM
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reply to post by Imightknow
 


If there is one guy in NJ that actually knows the firearms laws it is Mr. Nappen. That is his specialty.
I know people who have sought his services and turned out smelling like roses at the end of the day.

The worst part about NJ firearm laws is that most law enforcement agencies do not even know what they are.



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 02:15 PM
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NJ has nothing on where I live now... Illinois. Check out some of our gun laws. You cant even shoot an armed intruder if you have bought a gun solely for home protection. Its considered premeditated.



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 02:22 PM
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reply to post by Advantage
 


I know Illinois has some strict gun laws too, as does New York.
The craziest law in Illinois that I ever knew of was the effective ban on handguns in Chicago, requiring all firearms to be registered with the city police department, but the policy of the police department not to allow registration. In effect firearms were banned in the city, luckily this was fixed this past June.



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 02:23 PM
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reply to post by Imightknow
 


nice info, and yes it does make your blood boil.....

it would seem, that either there is more to this story, which would be unlikely, because if there was, then WHY, would the judge have had to block the defendants ability to put on a defense????

I would be more likely to believe that the ex-wife is in bed with someone from the prosecution or judicial side.........literally!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

S&F



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 02:29 PM
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reply to post by ParkerCramer
 


The part of the story that made me think twice is that the mother called 911 and then hung up, while the police show up anyway in that situation, then they called him and convinced him to drive 2 hours down to her home in Burliington County.

Its not like he was pulled over by the state police and had his vehicle searched, the story involves his mother, the 911 call, the police call and a 2 hour drive, there has to be something more to this, but I doubt the mother will ever say what really happened if there is.



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 02:30 PM
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Originally posted by youdidntseeme
reply to post by Advantage
 


I know Illinois has some strict gun laws too, as does New York.
The craziest law in Illinois that I ever knew of was the effective ban on handguns in Chicago, requiring all firearms to be registered with the city police department, but the policy of the police department not to allow registration. In effect firearms were banned in the city, luckily this was fixed this past June.



Yep.. the laws are ABSURD! ... and to have a firearm in your home you have to carry a picture ID.. its a permit to OWN a gun. Its called a FOID.. Firearm Owners ID for ANY firearm handgun to long gun.. They have inventoried somewhere every firearm everyone has in this state. In my area we have occupancy permits too which you must have readily available in case a cop shows up at yout door. It inventories every person inyour household and the relationships to eachother. You cant have someone visit for a week or 2 withoug adding them to it! Here they can actually bust in your house with no warrant to check compliance. If you need a link, I can find it... simply incredible. I HATE that we had to move here.



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 02:32 PM
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reply to post by youdidntseeme
 


yes, i agree, but the question remains, why would the judge suppress evidence that could possibly prove the man's inocence????



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 02:41 PM
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reply to post by Advantage
 


We have the FOID as well. Max magazine capacity of 10 on any gun, so many other frivolous laws that actually do not accomplish anything. I can think of one off the top of my head that a rifle can not have a bayonet lug at the end of the barrel in case anyone was thinking of bayonetting the neighbors. My best friend left the military and came home with his civvy ar15, so we actually had to cut the lug off the barrel for it to be legal here, or spend a few bucks and buy a new one.



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 02:50 PM
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Originally posted by youdidntseeme
reply to post by Advantage
 


We have the FOID as well. Max magazine capacity of 10 on any gun, so many other frivolous laws that actually do not accomplish anything. I can think of one off the top of my head that a rifle can not have a bayonet lug at the end of the barrel in case anyone was thinking of bayonetting the neighbors. My best friend left the military and came home with his civvy ar15, so we actually had to cut the lug off the barrel for it to be legal here, or spend a few bucks and buy a new one.


SO much for the right to bear arms..
I live very near the newly designated murder capitol of the nation.. it seems as if the only people with any protected firepower here are the criminals. I imagine its that way everywhere now. I remember when we used to have guns in our vehicles and there wasnt a problem. No one went around crazily shooting the town up and murders werent as common as they are now. Seems all of these new laws are having the opposite of the desired effect.



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 06:53 PM
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reply to post by Advantage
 


I take it you live in Camden. I guess if I lived there I would be arrested as soon as I got pulled over because I wouldn't be caught dead without a sidearm at least in my car.

Stay safe out there.



posted on Nov, 30 2010 @ 03:38 PM
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I lived in Watchung for 38 years right next to Ray's Sport Shop on Rt22. I used to go in all the time as a kid and when I turned 21 I naturally wanted a gun. Well after talking to lots of people on this topic I opted not to out of fear of prosecution. They tend to use having a firearm against you when they can't get access legally any other way. Now Ray's is out of business along with most other gun dealers in NJ.
Well now I'm in NM and I starting to feel free again just about everything is legal here. And I can carry a loaded firearm (unconcealed) on the street without a permit, in my car however I see fit (this includes on the dashboard) and don't even need registration for some that I purchased.
The police here in NM still even believe they are here 'to protect and serve' us, not 'to oppress and violate' like they do in NJ. Don't even get me started. . .
edit on 11/30/2010 by AnteBellum because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 1 2010 @ 07:15 AM
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reply to post by AnteBellum
[more


Congrats on moving out of Jersey and to a more free state such as NM. I lived in MD for a couple years while in the Marine Corps and I got a taste of what it's like to live in a state that enjoys taking people's freedoms. While not being anywhere near as bad as NJ (In MD we can still pump our own gas and smoke a cigarette in our own vehicles) it still gave me a sour taste in my mouth and I swore to myself to never live in a state like that again. Since I have lived in NV, AZ, CO, OH, and VA; all states with excellent gun laws that even allow anyone who isn't a felon to get a concealed permit.

I just find it amazing how different states in the same damn country can actually be from one another. Simply amazing.



posted on Dec, 1 2010 @ 07:45 AM
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reply to post by AnteBellum
 


Isnt that an amazing feeling? I left a slave state for a free one a few years ago and my life has improved dramatically. Now when I see a cop I actually smile and wave and they smile and wave back. I dont have to jump through crazy hoops to get what I want and even the people at the town hall are lax and loose with things like permits and deadlines. If you're late or forgot something that's okay just do it when you can. None of this kicking in the door to confiscate your property for being an hour late with a thing.

It's like a whole 'nother world when you get out of the slave states.

I'm never going back to another slave state. I could be offered a million dollar job and I'd refuse in an instant. The wife could take the kid and I just wouldnt visit. Never again will I set foot in a slave state.



posted on Dec, 1 2010 @ 01:37 PM
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Another thing about NJ I failed to mention was the absolute corruptness of all systems. My taxes for a 3/4 acre plot in Edison were @$5500 in 2005 and it was @$9000 in 2009. One reason for this big increase was that schools needed spanish tutors to teach spanish children english based classes, not that they should learn english because that would be discrimination. Also state police 'hang out' at the toll booths waiting for anyone with any violation to drive by so they can ticket (seat belts, inspection, registration, insurance, cracked windows, lights, etc.). No probable cause other then they are standing there. This coincides with the random location inspection trailer which they block main roads in towns making all who pass go through a on the spot inspection.
I could go on and on complaining but I grew up in NJ for 36 years and I love the east coast, but since 2001 it is not the same place. I am an architect and the amount of corruption in the building processes there are so out of control it would take total restructure to fix. The mob went out with the 80's but now the corporations are acting in the same manner as they did and even worse because they stay within there legal limits using lawyers to pull and tweak the system in there favors. Handouts and payoffs are the standard trade when trying to get through town ordinances and changing variances or dealing with the historical committees.
I agree with both of you, I would rather be anywhere else then back in NJ and am even considering leaving the USA entirely for another country but it is a big move with 2 young kids.



posted on Dec, 1 2010 @ 01:41 PM
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well as the saying goes kiss it where it smells, take it too NJ!

Seriously ive hear from quite a few people online, and offline, about NJ. corrupt politicians making the laws..its no wonder this is one outcome if yuo have arrogent leaders and politicians, then yuor going to have arrogent laws and as a result, the people will be affected by it a trickle effect



posted on Dec, 4 2010 @ 02:04 AM
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OK,

Here's the skippy in a nutshell :

Being from NJ (Jersey City/Hudson Co specifically) and being incredibly well versed in state items compared to the average person I must back the state in this case, NJ law specifies and emphasizes that if you must carry in the state you must get a carrying permit from the MVC (Motor Vehicle Commission) as if you do not within the first 15 - 45 days of moving your mere possession of them can and will warrant arrest. That is what he was convicted on. The fact that he said "life is not worth living anymore" alone is the deciding factor of the determination of mental competency. When he placed the call he made to his mom she had reported he was dispondent and possible inebriated. It is a low end felony to possess a firearm, loaded or not while being under the influence of anything as well as being forbidden to possess one period if you are either mentally, physically or psychologically deficient or incapacitated. That is ruled as a misdermeanor.

NJ will not however endorse and is an option for the state to recognize any out of state carrying permit. The only permits the state fully recognizes is that of any Federal Agent working for any of the Alphabet Agencies or military.

NJ however does allow you to travel through the state while carrying a firearm but if you are pulled over and are asked if you have any firearms you must disclose and produce not only the weapon but your permits. The LEO responding cannot take your weapons from you but can only in the event you fail a field sobriety test or are a danger/hazard to other drivers, have the serial numbers for the guns completely intact and not shaved and are to remain fully cooperative during the entire stop. If your documentation comes back clean (id, registration, insurance, carrying permits, serial number cheques (every gun that you buy and register requires the serial number be registered and that info is then issued to the national weapons owners database) they will (in 90% of cases) let you go with your mini arsenal. But you cannot travel with large caches of either weapons or munitions as that will most definately warrant Federal attention!
edit on 4-12-2010 by TheImmaculateD1 because: (no reason given)



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