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Evacuation time running out for NY city

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posted on Aug, 31 2010 @ 01:00 AM
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Here's hoping this storm stays well out to sea.
The worst damage from weakened storms usually happens when they hit where people aren't used to it...or several systems collide and amplify each other
The east coasters are used to heavy weather, even the great lakes gets the odd one coming in over the coast...

I don't have much faith in the weather forecasters in general, so I watch the barometer, and intellicast for the radar/sat maps
www.intellicast.com...
Generaly a great weather site.
Best of luck to NY and surrounds.
Don't all breath in all at the same time while facing out to sea....


[edit on 31-8-2010 by Danbones]




posted on Aug, 31 2010 @ 01:27 AM
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Nice, not only might I get struck by a hurricane cause i'm working in NY, but 3 days after it, I get to fly to New Orleans, and get infected with corexit!!! man I miss the good ol' midwest.



posted on Aug, 31 2010 @ 01:43 AM
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Originally posted by jlafleur02
reply to post by Helig
I hope your wrong about people evacuating. Many people will die if this does go up and hit NYC. I am watching this closely. Let hope it turns right out to sea



I swear you people are some of the biggest drama queens, I live in New York and I can tell you that there will be no fatalities when a hurricane hits over here. Nobody will be injured in the city and nobody will be killed, what you should worry about is the blokes east of long island, those are the people you need to pray for.



posted on Aug, 31 2010 @ 03:06 AM
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reply to post by Helig
 


You know, I once saw a documentary on The History Channel that described that exact scenario. They showed how much of the city would be inundated. I wish I could think of the name of that show so I could try to find a clip of it or something but for the life of me it will not come off the tip of my tongue right now.

Also I was watching the weather channel earlier yesterday and noticed that on their project path display they had it in red all the way up the eastern seaboard but when it got up close to New York it was like it stopped. The didn't have the path going that far up the map and that is what made me think of that History Channel documentary and got me wondering why they had the projection path cut off like that today. Today I noticed that they had it going much further up their map only because they had changed the projected path to be out at sea by the time it reached New York.

This would be a tragic event if it did make direct landfall in NYC and I agree that in many ways it would dwarf the effects of Hurricane Katrina, especially if it gains any more strength. I hope that it does not hit anywhere along the eastern seaboard and is just drug back out to sea but I guess we will just have to watch and hope for the best.



posted on Aug, 31 2010 @ 03:20 AM
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Wow i dont think I've ever heard of a hurricane hitting nyc, i think that could hurt alot of people on the holiday weekend.



posted on Aug, 31 2010 @ 03:30 AM
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www.nytimes.com...

read this



posted on Aug, 31 2010 @ 12:53 PM
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reply to post by Jakal26
 


The show you are talking about was called "It Could Happen Tomorrow" - it aired on the weather channel.

They based the episodes on disasters which happened in the past and showed what would happen if they occurred now. The NY episode was based on a real 1938 hurricane.


They also scripted an episode on a hurricane hitting New Orleans a few months BEFORE Katrina.



posted on Aug, 31 2010 @ 03:33 PM
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reply to post by Jakal26
 


Chances are the reason the projected path was cut off is that the projections are only reasonably accurate out to a few days, so coming up with anything beyond that point tends to be pointless as its never correct and by the time the storm gets there things have changed and whole new projections need to be generated.



posted on Sep, 3 2010 @ 04:44 AM
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Hopefully I was not prophetic on my first comment. I ran the last 2 hours of the movement, using the eye as a tracker. It does not seem to be veering out to sea yet.

If she hits Washington, I am not in control of HAARP.



posted on Sep, 3 2010 @ 06:11 AM
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Keep in mind when a mandatory evacuation is called some people panic, as a result there is traffic congestion and accidents. I wish I could remember which storm it was I heard this about - 100 died during evacuation and 9 from the storm. If the storm looks like it will be a bad one they wouldn't call for evacuations until about 18 hours before it is expected to make landfall. Just keep close tabs on the situation and have supplies and food on hand. If it makes you feel better get a full tank of gas in case of evacuation.



posted on Sep, 13 2010 @ 04:12 PM
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You couldn't get me to live in NYC right now for anything. Not that I would want to any time really...

How many people live in NYC? I think they a greater population than my whole state of Virginia, crammed into a single city. All their food has to be shipped in to them. It goes without saying it's crowded as hell and traffic is a nightmare. New Yorkers down here are often amazed at the fact that at intersections we actually willingly give up right away and let them go on. That's because it takes a whole 2 seconds and you go right after them, instead of waiting for minutes up there for endless streams of cars if you don't take your opportunity when you have it. When disasters happen, natural or man-made, it's an awful mess there. Remember everyone crowding onto the bridges out of Manhattan on 9/11, and they couldn't get anywhere. Everything is as expensive as hell. People won't even look at you as you pass them on the streets, and give you awkward looks if you actually wave at them or nod your head, acknowledging that they are there. I just don't see why people are drawn to this. It's like I read in another thread, they have built their own prison, a massive tragedy just waiting to happen, and often have too much pride in it at this point to relocate to a safer and more down-to-Earth area.

I don't smoke but cigarettes down here are $3-$5 a pack now. I've heard that up North in some places they're $8 a pack or more. I know truckers that come through and buy cartons and cartons of them and take them up North and sell them and make a lot of money. And gas and groceries are all more expensive too. But I bet minimum wage is the same there as it is here.


But mainly I would just be worried and anxious all the time if I lived there. There is too much fragility and too much that can go wrong when you cram that many people into such a small area and depend on all your food being shipped to you, and there are too many people to even escape quickly when something happens. And because of its size and vulnerability it is an obvious target for all sorts of mischief.


I would recommend all the more cautious and responsible New Yorkers relocate too, at least to the more rural parts of their state which are very beautiful and much different than the massive urban areas. Just for all the reasons given, not just any given disaster like a storm. You never know what is going to happen up there.

edit on 13-9-2010 by VirginiaRisesYetAgain because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 2 2010 @ 05:35 PM
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It's about time somebody did something about this.





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