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Humans survived ice age by sheltering in 'Garden of Eden', claim scientists

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posted on Jul, 28 2010 @ 11:58 AM
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"The last humans on Earth may have survived an ice age by retreating to a small patch of land nicknamed 'the garden of Eden'.
The strip of land on Africa's southern coast - around 240 miles east of Cape Town - became the only place that remained habitable during the devastating ice age, scientists claim.

www.dailymail.co.uk...




posted on Jul, 28 2010 @ 12:06 PM
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From the article linked above:

It is thought that 70,000 years ago a dry period caused Red Sea levels to fall and the gap across its mouth to shrink from 18 miles to eight miles.

A tribe of as few as 200 period took advantage of this and crossed to Arabia.
____________________________________________________

Is this implying that the tale of moses parting the sea actually happened 70,000 years ago?

I guess that really is taking a huge Leap but its not any less speculative then most of that article.

~meathead



posted on Jul, 28 2010 @ 12:13 PM
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Garden of Eden in africa?? I thought it was in the middle east, but if so, to bad today it's no mare than a mere wasteland "SIGH"



posted on Jul, 28 2010 @ 12:17 PM
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That makes sense. Especially when they talk about gene diversity our species has little of. I bet mankind is alot older than we think. This article only represents that fact.



posted on Jul, 28 2010 @ 12:19 PM
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reply to post by SelfmadeGME
 


South Africa is hardly a wasteland. Yes, it has political problems, but it is a gorgeous country. It is perhaps the nicest part of Africa, in terms of climate and geography.



posted on Jul, 28 2010 @ 12:20 PM
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Originally posted by moonwilson
reply to post by SelfmadeGME
 


South Africa is hardly a wasteland. Yes, it has political problems, but it is a gorgeous country. It is perhaps the nicest part of Africa, in terms of climate and geography.


No I wasn't talking about Africa, I ment if it was in the middle east.



posted on Jul, 28 2010 @ 12:27 PM
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reply to post by SelfmadeGME
 


Oh, I'm sorry, my mistake. Not all of the Middle East is a wasteland either though. In the West our mental image of the region is of sandy deserts, camels etc., but its not all like that. If everyone there were to wake up tomorrow morning and could somehow all magically get along, it could be a be a nice place.



posted on Jul, 28 2010 @ 02:43 PM
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OHHHHHHH im loving this

Star and a massive wave of the flag for this thread. Thankyou for posting. This has massive connections with what i was saying in relation to some of my threads.
cheers



posted on Jul, 28 2010 @ 02:49 PM
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the middle east really IS africa. this makes plenty of sense. As a student of ancient mystery schools, they all believe that man and civilization has been around for hundreds of thousands of years and succumbs to the same rise/fall cycle over and over again.



posted on Jul, 29 2010 @ 03:59 AM
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It's an interesting article and conjures up thoughts of what it would have been like to be within that group of 200 people, using only Professor Mareans views. Finding a place where they could survive, not knowing they were the only people left on earth, the only hopes of repopulating the world and being responsible for not letting an entire species go extinct.

reply to post by SelfmadeGME
 
The artlcle states they nicknamed it 'the garden of Eden' not that it actually was the garden of Eden.



posted on Jul, 29 2010 @ 04:20 AM
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reply to post by gem_man
 
It's possible the journalist was having a slow news day or simply pulled out a story he'd prepared earlier? The discovery of the cave was in the news 3 or 4 years ago. Marean speculates that the cave may have represented a 'niche ecology' that helped our species to survive the ice age environments.

The only mention of 'Garden of Eden' is by the journalist.

As Chris Stringer points out in the article, no researchers seriously suggest we arose from one small population in such relatively recent history. The linear model of migration has been left behind some years ago. Modern conceptions describe a dynamic environment with small, diverse populations in niches.



posted on Jul, 29 2010 @ 04:36 AM
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Originally posted by Kandinsky
reply to post by gem_man
[

The only mention of 'Garden of Eden' is by the journalist.

As Chris Stringer points out in the article, no researchers seriously suggest we arose from one small population in such relatively recent history. .... Modern conceptions describe a dynamic environment with small, diverse populations in niches.


correct...
this article points out that there was an enclave, a pocket-of-people...
[there were most likely many other enclaves all over the globe as well...


it is presumptious to even entertain the notion that this particular enclave of people (group/tribe) became our only ancestors...its almost as absurd that humankind has only the Noah family as its sole ancestory

instead... these accounts are telling us modern people that small bands/groups/tribes all rode out the iceage in enclaves or peaceful pockets of beneficial ecology...unknown to one another



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