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My Wrist Watch vs Actual Time

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posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 12:01 PM
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Hello to all…..

Mods, I am not real sure where to place this so feel free to move as appropriate.

I have been a member for quite some time without much substance to contribute. I thoroughly enjoy all the input members take the time to respond with.

I have been thinking about this situation for quite some time now and I will also admit that I have been both hesitant in posting this as well as speaking about such as I have been unable to find anything regarding this.

In the past two years, I have worn a watch, a Lorus quartz watch which needs a battery to maintain function, on a regular daily basis, without incident. I have noticed that when I where said watch while at work, (I am a finish carpenter, new construction, get in and get out as fast as possible and move on to the next), that my watch, at the end of the day, has progressed 4-5 hours ahead of the actual time of day. I thought the first go around was a fluke so I tested it, again and again. If I maintain normal activities during the day, it keeps perfect time. Heh..whatever “perfect time” may be, yet when I go to work and work hard, it passes time as I said, to the point of being 4-5 hours ahead of actual time.

I did have a conversation with a friend of mine about this and he stated that he knows two people who cannot wear watches that have batteries as the battery will drain quite rapidly.

Has anyone else ever experienced this or heard of this before? I am quite stumped as to why the time would speed up on my watch…………




posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 12:50 PM
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This same scenario happens to me quite frequently actually...

Its very strange, its not just watches for me, but cell phones, or any electronic device tends to go haywire around me.

My mother has the same problem, she attributes it to our "energy."

It freaks out my lady friends when we go for walks at night and street lights go out when we walk by, then come back on when we are a safe distance away.

Ive never heard of a Lorus watch, but from my experience you get what you pay for in life.

I currently have a Rolex Submariner, which is self winding, and Ive had no problems.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 12:59 PM
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My watch is good when I'm wearing it, unless I'm alseep. When it's off it'll slow down, and over the night only 2 or 3 hours will have passed. Same if I fall asleep with it on, it winds down. It's fine when I'm awake and doing stuff, or sitting down reading ect. I definatly have some "influence" over the workings of it.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 01:10 PM
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Time is never "actual" . It is invented by perception and referenced by our ability to witness change which is not an instrument of time.


Faulty watch? Or maybe alien gotcha?



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 01:17 PM
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Some watches are affected by movements in your wrist.

So doing carpentry would definitely move your wrist a lot more than when you're sitting at home, and thus make time move faster.

Usually they're self-winding watches because wrist movement makes them wind up a tiny bit each time.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 01:20 PM
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Originally posted by careface
Some watches are affected by movements in your wrist.

So doing carpentry would definitely move your wrist a lot more than when you're sitting at home, and thus make time move faster.

Usually they're self-winding watches because wrist movement makes them wind up a tiny bit each time.


i was waiting for the Occam's Razor explanation, Thanks... Star for you!



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 01:23 PM
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Simple answer watch defect... Complicated physicist answer... Watch Steven Hawkings special on time travel he discusses time and how it moves. Its one theory but, my guess it manufacturers defect. Maybe get a new battery or get a watch repair to look at it.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 01:50 PM
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reply to post by careface
 


Interesting thought! I suppose that this explanation could be a possibility.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 01:51 PM
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reply to post by Xiamara
 


I don't think it is a defect in the watch. As I said, it works fine under normal circumstances. It is only when I work really hard and fast that it speeds up.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 02:25 PM
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heh, well guess the saying 'time flies when you're having fun' could indeed apply...



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 02:37 PM
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reply to post by monguzi
 


the OP stated VERY clearly that the watch was not an automatic and needed a battery.... so not an explanation hmmmmm



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 05:34 PM
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Thank you to those who took the time to read this and post. I was really hoping that would have some more debate regarding this as I still don't think that we have come to any conclusive proof as to why this sort of thing happens.

Is it a transference of energy? Is it a different time the watch perceives during rushed activities? Transference of heat from the body?

Thanks again to those who took the time..........



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 05:37 PM
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reply to post by savageheart
 


I used to have a watch on which the winding stem would frequently get knocked into the time-setting position when I was working with my hands, resulting in me accidentally resetting the time on the watch. Any chance it's something as simple as that?



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 08:03 PM
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reply to post by Perfect stranger
 


i don't know why you are quoting me... but ok, the simplest explanation is that while working with hands (carpentry) the buttons on the watch are being hit. now, i know you'd love to think that some crazy time dilation is happening, however this is NOT the simplest explanation.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 10:35 PM
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Perhaps I have not been clear enough for some, or , the original post has not been read thoroughly. The watch I am referring to is indeed a battery operated watch. While I also understand the the explanation of having the stem, which would indeed change the dial, come into play, I guarantee that this is not what has happened.

The watch, battery operated, no winding required, no stem having been pulled out as I have tested this on many an occasion to make sure.....still moves time ahead.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 11:06 PM
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reply to post by savageheart
 


no buttons? how do you set it?

you know, if you want to believe it is, whatever you think is happening go for it. however if you are actually looking for an explanation. It is most likely

1. your hand
2. watch defect
3. you are in a time warp

buy another watch... wear it on your left hand with the "defective" one on your right. go to work. if time has in fact skewed both watches should read the exact same time....



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 11:59 PM
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When you bang with the hammer, the buttons bounce.

Any tool that causes a lot of vibration or a shock can make a digital do odd stuff, if you've got a loose solder joint or a button that tends to bounce active.

One reason I never wore a digital in the Army.



posted on Jul, 27 2010 @ 12:08 AM
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op have you ever entertained the though that your "purpose" in life as "carpenter" is to build things that will stand the test of time?

Its kind of hard to build "quality" "things" if you rush the process...wouldn't you agree?

maybe somebody is trying to tell you something



posted on Jul, 27 2010 @ 02:43 AM
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reply to post by savageheart
 

Interesting, although Occam's Razor most likely applies here. You never mentioned anything personally related to actually "losing time", "gaining time" or "missing time" but just that your watch doesn't keep the correct time and only while doing a specific task. You didn't state it but I interpreted that others around you don't lose time. You stated this began 2 years ago. Did you wear a different watch or brand prior to this time? Have you been a carpenter for more than 2 years? Have you tried a different brand of battery?

Being a finish carpenter I'll assume that your local environment changes often, although I could be wrong if you're employed at a manufactured home setting, for example. I'll assume your job takes you to different locations often and a constant local environment is not a possible cause. You obviously are moving your hands a lot in various ways throughout the day which can potentially be a cause, as mentioned by others. You're around machinery and motors so I question if magnetism could be affecting the battery in some way. Ambient temperatures could be another possible cause. When I used to wear a watch I've noticed similar, although not constant or consistent, issues and have always been involved in using my hands at work, including construction. Hope I was able to give you a few more possible reasons to think about.

And finally, in a most likely failed attempt of humor and relating some of my favorite lyrics, maybe you just have some time to kill today:



"Tired of lying in the sunshine staying home to watch the rain And you are young and life is long and there is time to kill today And then one day you find ten years have got behind you No one told you when to run, you missed the starting gun"



posted on Jul, 27 2010 @ 11:44 AM
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reply to post by savageheart
 


OP, why don't you test it? Buy another watch and see if it still happens



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