Nigeria to Send Me $3000US for What?

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posted on Jun, 17 2004 @ 01:54 PM
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From the posts above I assume most don't know about the actual political situation in Nigeria and moreover where it is located. But at least give an opinion and use the word terrorism




posted on Jun, 17 2004 @ 02:05 PM
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Well, the problem with my resume is that it does have some private information, not my SSN, but it is available to businesses on this particular Job Web Site. I guess I might as well take it down then, seeing that these people may be able to use that to their advantage.
But anyway, here is another e-mail address that they use if someone would like to mess with them:
daniel orkan

I will still wait and see if they send me the money, if they do, ill just keep it and blow them off...

That gives me an idea, How would you go about scamming Nigerians??



posted on Jun, 17 2004 @ 03:36 PM
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There is always the chance that they'll kidnap you and hold you for ransom. I also wouldn't spend any of the $3000 yet. If they send you a check, deposit it into a savings account and wait a few weeks. I'm sure the bank will let you know if it comes back.
I worked in Saudi Arabia for 1 year. The company was American based. If the company you are talking was American based, it would be a different thing. You never know what you'll get dealing with a company in a foreign country.



posted on Jun, 18 2004 @ 12:31 AM
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It said Chevron Nigeria.Contact Chevron and see if they can shed any light on it.


d1k

posted on Jun, 18 2004 @ 12:37 AM
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Read these websites. They scam the scammers whom send those emails and web sites. These are some of the most brilliant and funniest things I have ever read

www.419fun.com...

www.scammertainment.nm.ru...



posted on Jun, 18 2004 @ 10:32 AM
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Turns out to be just another scam. This one is so ridiculous, I'm not sure how anyone could fall for this considering their choice of words. "Please send the agency substantial amounts of money."

THANKS FOR THE YOUR PROMPT RESPONSE IN RESPECT OF THE JOB I OFFERED YOU,SMEATON CONSULTING LIMITED. I WILL BE SENDING YOU THE PREVIEW OF CONTRACT TERMS AND AGREEMENT .

YOU WILL NEED TO CONTACT OUR AGENCY THAT WILL PREPARE YOUR TRAVEL DOCUMENT AND YOU WILL NEED TO PAY A SUBSTANTIAL AMOUNT TO THE AGENCY AND YOU MAKE SURE THAT YOU ARE GIVEN A RECEIPT FOR THE PAYMENT YOU MADE FOR THE TRAVEL DOCUMENTS.THE DOCUMENT THAT WILL ARE AS FOLLOWS.

1,A LETTER OF EMPLOYMENT.

2,WORKING AND RESIDENCIAL PERMIT

3HARD COPY OF THE CONTRACT TERMS AND AGGREMENT.

THE AGENCY WILL BE SENDING THIS DOCUMENTS THROUGH A COURIER SERVICE (DHL).

WE SHALL BE RE-IMBURSING YOU TOGETHER WITH A MONTH SALARY.

WE SHALL BE LOOKING FORWARD TO SEE YOU

REGARDS,



DANIEL ORKAN



[edit on 18-6-2004 by Jamuhn]



posted on Jun, 18 2004 @ 10:35 AM
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I am sent these things every day i read the very first 1 and just burst out ,laughing now i just delete bloody things.

[edit on 18-6-2004 by drunk]



posted on Jun, 18 2004 @ 12:18 PM
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For a corporation they sure must be dirt poor... you know... not being able to afford a spell checker etc.

My office gets a few hundred of emails similar to those every day. Of course our anti-spam software blocks them but going through the queues can be fun. They have a lot of things in common.
1) They're almost always typed in all caps.
2) They no longer ask for your bank account and SSN is the first email. They ask you to correspond with them a few times before doing that now.
3) They're loaded full of strange language such as addressing you as "Your excellency" and calling themselves all sorts of interesting titles.
4) If you check the headers a good percentage of them come from Asia and not Africa (no matter what they claim), primarily Malaysia and Thailand.

This has been going on for years, and honestly I don't know why they still do it. I can't imagine anyone is going to send their social security number to someone on the internet. But, truth is, if no one did it they'd stop sending them wouldn't they...

Ah well.



posted on Jun, 18 2004 @ 12:54 PM
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Originally posted by Jamuhn
That gives me an idea, How would you go about scamming Nigerians??


What would you scam out of them, a carafe of their finest dust? The best thing to do with them is play along and waste their time. I tried but the e-mail address must be shut down. The more of their time you waste the less likely they are to find a true schmuck. People continue to lose money to these scams; but the employment one is newer.

What's fun is when you get them to send pictures of "themselves" or their family. You now it's not really them and you wonder how much those people got paid for a picture that's e-mailed around the world.



posted on Jun, 18 2004 @ 04:40 PM
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Replying to them is a waste of time. Firstly as soon as one of these scams is reporting the email address is terminated. Don't forget: these scammers can't use spoofed email addresses because they require replies from their victims. The email address it comes from must be real. So when an ISP receives a report that this sort of email is sent out, they terminate it. Additionally, there really is nothing to gain out of replying to them even if you can get through. What's the point, to make them look stupid? Seems like something that might amuse you for 10 minutes if you're terribly bored but that's about it. I wouldn't bother. Only a complete idiot would join these people in a business transaction, and quite frankly anyone who sends their bank account numbers and social security number to a jackass who emailed them out of nowhere deserves what they get.



posted on Jun, 18 2004 @ 06:13 PM
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Yea man, they haven't asked me for that information yet, but I'm sure they will. RIght now, I am playing along with them to see what else they say. I'll probably start berating them after the next e-mail or so. I never replied to one of these before, but I as well get all sorts of these through e-mail.



posted on Jun, 21 2004 @ 01:25 PM
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Contact the US embassy and see if they can give you any info on the company especialy if they claim to be legit and involved in work with the Nigerian government.



posted on Jun, 21 2004 @ 01:53 PM
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Here is a link with a couple of examples of Nigerian job scams. Looks like the wage they offered you was below the going rate....

Chevron nigeria - employment scam - promised employment - you pay for visas and permits - then get it refunded???

Texaco - Chevron oil Nigeria - employment scam - promised employment - very impressive oil industry package - contract supplied - you pay for visas and permits - then get it refunded along with first months pay before you go out to Nigeria ???

Chevron know nothing of this project - Agent uses a Yahoo email address. When search on internet carried out SomeCompany Consulting .net has a warning about someone miss representing then!! No one seems to be doing anything about this though - Cheron or yourcompany??


www.scamorama.com...



posted on Jul, 10 2004 @ 11:21 AM
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I do not think, thai it is a good idea to participate in any business with anyone in Nigeria, or in Africa. The Africans are very poor people, there is no money at all. In fact, several secret agencies are working on tracking down the 419 scammers. As I read things about this, it became clear to me, that it is a huge industry in Nigeria, and top officials are deeply involved in this scam. Sending E-mail to the victims is just one possibility to reap them off, I have seen imaginative ways to perform such a scam. For example, you do not always have to send them money, it is enough if you send them your identity. But today the most efficent way to scam someone is the spyware, which gathers information about you eg PIN codes, and sends it to the scammer. Still, losing money is only one thing. The African scammers use barbarian ways to eliminate their victims if they dare to travel there. And the most important thing, is that they (especially Nigerians) can do just about anything, and get away with it.
In the United States more than a hundred million dollars loss is being reported to Internet scams, and hardly any is recovered. Several murder cases, kidnappings, suicides, and fatal threats are also reported.

I think the best thing is simply to stay away from this massive business offer. Playing game with these people is hardly a good idea, as you may be playing with dangerous criminals who may not actually be in Nigeria at the time you bust their brains uo. Also these are not really poor like their mates in Nigeria, they do have money to send men to anywhere in the world.



posted on Jul, 10 2004 @ 11:25 AM
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Originally posted by Djarums
Replying to them is a waste of time.


I replied once asking the guy to meet me in the locak shopping centre
i dunno if he was in Hong Kong or not since then i havent recieved any of the stupid things *fingers crossed*



posted on Jul, 10 2004 @ 12:00 PM
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Yeah, you were damn lucky. I have seen two websites where scammers were scammed. They arranged meetings on the street, where webcameras were set. You know what? I don't really want to meet with those guys I have seen on the pictures... This really proves, that each scam involves many scammers, if a victim is baited then he/she surely gets the worst.



posted on Jul, 10 2004 @ 01:00 PM
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Even if it is a scam, well, do a search on chevron and human rights, or hallliburton and human rights, and see what you come up with....I haven't on chevron, but halliburton was enough. I wouldn't want to be involved because of that....



posted on Jul, 10 2004 @ 02:00 PM
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Scams work 2 ways
Post a resume under a false identity in order to get into one of these scams under a false name. You get the realistic looking scam check, you endorse it over to any deserving low-life for cash. (if you can play this so that the check you get is low-ammount, like 500, it helps. just make a smaller request perhaps?)

A common scam which preys upon boot-Marines in Oceanside, CA is for a scammer to pose as a tourist who has never seen an ATM, and to trade bad foreign checks in the 300-500 dollar range for the max 200 dollars that can be withdrawn from a Pacific Marine Credit Union account. I was always petrified that I might one day be fighting for my life alongside people who fell for this.
You pose as a Marine (friday nights at The Body Shop or Deja Vu in Oceanside, CA. Stay away from other Marines, act shy, keep an eye out for well dressed young men who are paying too much attention to the Marines and not enough to the girls.
Once you're the mark, you play half-way into his scam. We can help eachother friend, I got this check as a grad present from boot, my parents are Nigerian Missionaries. Anyway, my friggin girlfriend just left while i was at boot- now i owe the landlord a ton of money and I can't keep cash in my account. Give me that X dollar check you were talking about, plus the difference, and you can take this 500 dollar check. I can probably trade the smaller check to one of my fellow Marines for cash. If you conman is stupid, he may actually give you a small amount of cash along with the bad check, in exchange for your bad check.

Alternately, you tell him you have a better idea: same reason as above. You tell him that you've got to hide you cash so that you don't get your account frozen. Tell him to create an American bank account and write you a series of post-dated checks (not made out to anyone yet, so as to launder them easily) corresponding to your paydays, and you want to get your direct deposit moved to that account. "but if you screw me I will kill you" or some futile macho marine BS like that. He's not putting up any cash, so he may just do it. If he played ball, he has given you a name, mailing address, and checks. Use this info to pull off the following scam


I'm not going to give you a detailed how to in identity theft, but any retard can do it. A fake employer ID and a modified copy of your own social security card get you a certified birth cert. A fake employer ID and a birth cert get you an AZ drivers license. A driverse license and birth cert can get you a social security card. That's everything you need to do ANYTHING in a persons name. The drivers license is the important part though.
As mentioned in the direct deposit scam, you have checks from this person, and you have your pic on an ID with his name. Go pass the checks and let him fry for it. The worst case scenario is that he used a fake or stolen ID, and even then he's already stealing from them, so you're not doing anything so wrong... just getting a cut from the thief.


Now where are my logical people- I know somebody is gonna show me why i'm not as smart as i think.



posted on Jul, 10 2004 @ 02:12 PM
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Personally I would politely decline the offer and leave it at that. Given they have most of your important details if you piss them off then there is always the off chance they have a cousin, friend or whatever near you and it's just not worth it.

For future reference never trust anyone from Africa. Even if the job was legit you would be crazy to even consider living in such a corrupt place with absolutely no contacts you can trust there. That goes for most other countries on the planet as well. And if you are willing to take on that kind of extra risk do yourself a favor and make sure you get paid decent $$$ unless your life isn't worth anything to you. Why do you think civilian contactors in the middle-east get paid so well? It's called danger money.



posted on Jul, 10 2004 @ 02:30 PM
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Yeah, one thing is so sure about those countries: Criminals and terrorists can always benefit from the primitive government and security, and from the lack of diplomatic contact with the well situated countries. I think, this scamming will go on and on for several more years, and it will become the prime job of the African Elite. I am sure, there is no money laundering for a very simple reason: there is no money at all.





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