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Help..Cosmati Pavement?

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posted on Jul, 4 2010 @ 12:03 PM
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Okay so it's been covered up in Westminster Abbey for over a century but has recently been opened for restoration. It supposedly has a formula/riddle that tells you when the end of the world will be..But I cant find the formula/riddle or the answer to it anywhere.

Any Information On It Will Be Appreciated...




posted on Jul, 4 2010 @ 12:31 PM
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Okay so I been checking out various links and its written in small letters all around the pavement "multiply the lifespan" of this animal times this animal etc. and you'll get the exact date of the end of times, but who's to say what an accurate lifetime for these animals were in those days?..Still no thoughts? I know I'm not the only one who's ever heard of this .



posted on Jul, 4 2010 @ 12:33 PM
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Ive never actually heard of this, its all news to me. Do you have a source for this? I could use google but since you went through all the hard work of making a thread i figure you are as good as anybody on here to post the viable information, thanks!



(edit to correct punctuation!)

[edit on 7/4/2010 by The Endtime Warrior]



posted on Jul, 4 2010 @ 12:54 PM
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reply to post by ATLien
 

Intriguing! I have never heard of this, I will have to dig in a bit.

Here are some pics, hope that helps op.













Peace


[edit on 4-7-2010 by speculativeoptimist]



posted on Jul, 4 2010 @ 12:57 PM
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reply to post by speculativeoptimist
 


interesting. reminds me of some crop circles i've seen. especially the 2nd picture. and this is in england? fascinating.

btw i love TOOL!



posted on Jul, 4 2010 @ 12:59 PM
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reply to post by The Endtime Warrior
 


Cropcircles....me too.
Going to see Tool this wknd in Seattle...woohoo!

Peace



posted on Jul, 4 2010 @ 01:06 PM
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reply to post by ATLien
 


Some additional info:
www.guardian.co.uk...



It was laid in the 1260s, when Henry III sent his new Abbot of Westminster, Richard de Ware, for talks with the Pope in Rome. The Englishman saw a newly installed pavement in the Pope's summer residence, knew it was just the thing for the cathedral which Henry was spectacularly rebuilding around the tomb of St Edward the Confessor, and arrived home with a ship load of marble, glass and Italian craftsmen. Ware's reward was his own tomb incorporated into the design. Henry's tomb, and the saint's shrine, were originally covered in similar work, but all the scraps of marble and glass were picked out as sacred relics by generations of pilgrims.

Only a handful of brass letters remains of the original long inscription, but it was transcribed centuries ago. It names the king, the chief craftsman as Odoricus, gives the date in a tortuous riddle, and then mysteriously suggests that the world will last for 19,683 years, by adding together the life spans of different animals: "add dogs and horses and men, stags and ravens, eagles, enormous whales ...."


www.paulmellender.com...



Before I move on I would also like to mention another branch of this riddle that can, and should be followed concerning musical time. The word drum and “dream” have a common root, “drom”, meaning music and noise in Germanic languages, but should be traced back further to Greek “drome- race course or run”, Greek “drama- act, play, or deed” and Sanskrit “dramati- run, or do”. The Greek drama was especially in reference to tragedies, which means “song on the occasion of the He-goat.” Tragedies were Dionysian ritual activities. Tragedies were not necessarily “tragic” although they were usually dithyrambic songs concerning the death of a goat or “satyr” plays. The idea of sorrow became attached, perhaps justly, due to a word game. Dionysos was also called Eleuther. This name may mean “the one who arrives” similar to Eleusis and Elysium, both with the sense “arrive” and both referring to the underworld. Not in the modern sense of arrive, but rather “come to shore or land”- ar riparia. It must be remembered in Greece to go to the dead one had to be taken by ferry across the waters of the Styx by the ferryman, Charon (Karon). In Gilgamesh the ferryman is Urshanabi, who ferries over the waters of death. In Egypt, tomb boats were common for Pharaohs.


Peace



posted on Jul, 4 2010 @ 01:18 PM
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Originally posted by The Endtime Warrior
Ive never actually heard of this, its all news to me. Do you have a source for this? I could use google but since you went through all the hard work of making a thread i figure you are as good as anybody on here to post the viable information, thanks!
[edit on 7/4/2010 by The Endtime Warrior]


I saw it on a British Documentary series call Time Travelers:West Minster Abbey..The host was speaking to the man in charge of the restoration and he was beating around the bush about what the inscription means, when asked directly what the riddle equates to he giggled and said "basically it says the world will last to see the death of 3 sea monster"...I don't know how he came to this conclusion tho...But also the pink orb in the middle is supposedly the universe at the beginning of time..And that's all that was said regarding the Pavement.



posted on Jul, 4 2010 @ 01:20 PM
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reply to post by ATLien
 


Well thanks to you for bringing this stuff to my attention, I have never heard of this before. Also thanks to speculative optimist for the extra info. I am intrigued by the adding life spans of animals to determine the end of the world. Very interesting indeed!



posted on Jul, 4 2010 @ 05:11 PM
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Typical numerology in which unrelated values and processes are tossed together to come up with a number that is given a ooohh - aaahh for no particular reason.



posted on Jul, 6 2010 @ 05:57 AM
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Originally posted by stereologist
Typical numerology in which unrelated values and processes are tossed together to come up with a number that is given a ooohh - aaahh for no particular reason.

There is more to it than that..I'm surprised no one has any prior knowledge to contribute, especially those in the UK.



posted on Jul, 6 2010 @ 06:16 AM
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Originally posted by ATLien
Okay so it's been covered up in Westminster Abbey for over a century but has recently been opened for restoration. It supposedly has a formula/riddle that tells you when the end of the world will be..But I cant find the formula/riddle or the answer to it anywhere.

Any Information On It Will Be Appreciated...


The information you're after was revealed in the latest episode of the British show called Time Team. This particular episode was called "The Secrets Of Westminster Abbey" - Season 17, Episode 8 – Aired: 6/28/2010.

It's relatively easy to locate a copy of that episode online with just a bit of searching. That's how I got to see it a few days ago. (Hint: torrent)

The hidden message was explained as was also the calculation of the so-called "end of the world". But rest easy, that date is many thousands of years away


[edit on 6/7/10 by tauristercus]



posted on Jul, 6 2010 @ 07:52 AM
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reply to post by ATLien
 


There is no more to numerology than the application of whimsy to unrelated numbers.



posted on Jul, 22 2010 @ 04:19 AM
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Originally posted by stereologist
reply to post by ATLien
 


There is no more to numerology than the application of whimsy to unrelated numbers.


What I mean is they arent just random numbers thrown together it is a verbal riddle, the host just summed it up, there is no actual documentation of the riddle other than the brief numerological related explanation given by one man.




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