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Amazing New Heart Imaging Technology! LightLab!

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posted on Jul, 1 2010 @ 03:24 AM
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ATS Team:

As some of you might have noticed from some of my work in this medical forum, I am involved with many new advanced medical technologies.

Here is an astounding new imaging device that creates incredible high resolution images from within ”tiny” heart vessels, showing details that have never before been seen!

Subsequent to its introduction in places such as Europe, Australia & other advanced medical markets, LightLab technology has now been approved for use in the USA.

The imaging system is called the ”LightLab C7XR Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging System”.



It works via a tiny laser imaging catheter that is placed within vessels such as the tiny coronary vessels.

The imaging catheter is called the ”LightLab DragonFly Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging Probe”.



This is what a LightLab image from within a 2 mm coronary vessel looks like:



Before LightLab imaging technology, the only way to take such intra-vessel images was via low resolution IVUS ultrasound systems that resolved at least 15-20 times worse than LightLab.

This is what an IVUS ultrasound image looks like…..the difference is stark!


Here is a video from Good Morning America regarding LightLab:

abcnews.go.com...

Here is a video from a technology awards presentation. regarding LightLab



I hope you find this interesting!


Please let me know if you have any questions.

Kind regards
Maybe…maybe not




posted on Jul, 1 2010 @ 04:32 AM
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Awesome stuff.

Is this another Aussie innovation?



posted on Jul, 1 2010 @ 05:37 AM
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Holy Fantastic Voyage, Batman! That's amazing. Won't be long before it's *transmitting* and has its own little propulsion system, I reckon... So that will be just like Fantastic Voyage.

Except without Raquel. Damn.

[edit on 1-7-2010 by CHRLZ]



posted on Jul, 1 2010 @ 06:33 AM
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Originally posted by Chadwickus

Awesome stuff.

Is this another Aussie innovation?


Chadwickus.....

No.....it's based on technology developed at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, USA.

However, some of the best interventional cardiologists in the world work in Australia & NZ & they are leading the way with the clinical application of this new LightLab technology.

Kind regards
Maybe...maybe not



posted on Jul, 1 2010 @ 06:37 AM
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Originally posted by CHRLZ
Holy Fantastic Voyage, Batman! That's amazing. Won't be long before it's *transmitting* and has its own little propulsion system, I reckon... So that will be just like Fantastic Voyage.
Except without Raquel. Damn.


CHRLZ.....

Well, you should see the high-res 3D longitudinal "fly through" image reconstruction solution that will soon be released for clinical work.

Absolutely fantastic stuff!


Kind regards
Maybe...maybe not



posted on Jul, 1 2010 @ 09:41 AM
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reply to post by Maybe...maybe not
 


Awesome MMN!

I can see this technology eventually being used in pediatrics as well...

S&F

IRM



posted on Jul, 1 2010 @ 11:26 AM
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Maybe...maybe not... I am new to the imaging informatics field (PACS Administrator) only have a couple years under my belt. Where would this best be utilized (i.e. Medical Imaging, OR, Cardiology)?


JT



posted on Jul, 1 2010 @ 03:33 PM
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Originally posted by InfaRedMan
reply to post by Maybe...maybe not
 


Awesome MMN!
I can see this technology eventually being used in pediatrics as well...
S&F
IRM


InfaRedMan.....

You raise an interesting point.

To date, all our work has involved conditions pertaining to adult conditions. I will have a think about the possible paediatric applications & issues therein.

Kind regards
Maybe...maybe not

[edit on 1-7-2010 by Maybe...maybe not]



posted on Jul, 1 2010 @ 03:40 PM
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Originally posted by Greenblaz
Maybe...maybe not... I am new to the imaging informatics field (PACS Administrator) only have a couple years under my belt. Where would this best be utilized (i.e. Medical Imaging, OR, Cardiology)?
JT


Greenblaz.....

PACS administrator.....? That's a great field. We have been closely involved with an innovative PACS/RIS solution, however our partner Co was purchased by Microsoft.

The LightLab is used only in cardiac catheter labs by interventional cardiologists.

Presently, there are a small number of innovative interventional radiologists that are considering the use of LightLab for peripheral vascular scanning.

However, there are some system features that whilst advantageous for cardiology applications, can compromise peripheral vascular applications.

Kind regards
Maybe...maybe not

[edit on 1-7-2010 by Maybe...maybe not]



posted on Jul, 1 2010 @ 06:59 PM
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reply to post by Maybe...maybe not
 


Very cool! Thanks for the info.

Which RIS/PACS are/were you involved with? We are currently using Carestream RIS/PACS


JT

[edit on 1-7-2010 by Greenblaz]



posted on Jul, 1 2010 @ 07:38 PM
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What will be the real "breakthrough" that we really need is to not only see the anatomy, but the physiology. When we have the ability to take these images and discern the plaques' inflammatory status, we'll have the Golden Bullet we've been dreaming about for decades.

All plaques are not created equal. Some small plaques, with significant inflammatory components, can be viewed as essentially negative because they are less than 50%, but can rupture and produce sudden cardiac death just days later. That is why cardiac C-Reactive Protein tests have become so helpful.

When the imaging shows us the patho-physiology of the anatomy, it will be as much of a leap forward as when Dr. Roentgen accidentally discovered his "X" rays in his office in Wurzburg, Germany!



posted on Jul, 1 2010 @ 09:41 PM
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Amazing tech! Have had my share of heart work done, I am always interested in current medical technology. I even got my cardiologist to give me a copy of the data from on of my test they did in the cath-lab. Unfortunately I can't read it and don't have the program, but if I open some of the folders I can access some sort thumbnails with images of my heart and the wire thingy going through it.

Medical technology always amazes me. But I'll tell ya what, after what I have been through I would be more than happy to never have the need for such technology to be used on me!



posted on Jul, 2 2010 @ 03:04 AM
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Originally posted by Greenblaz
reply to post by Maybe...maybe not
 

Very cool! Thanks for the info.
Which RIS/PACS are/were you involved with? We are currently using Carestream RIS/PACS


Greebblaz.....

We were involved with an extremely interesting totally integrated PACS / RIS / HIS called "AMALGA" as developed by Global Care Solutions.

Microsoft purchased them & they will be the front-line MS health care solution.

The system was developed at Bumrungrad Private Hosp.....a truly 5 star hospital.....the most highly profitable hospital in Asia. It's one of the best hospitals I've ever seen.

The extremely clever & lovely lady who runs & basically owns that hospital contracted an international team to develop the solution.

Kind regards
Maybe...maybe not



posted on Jul, 2 2010 @ 03:40 AM
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Originally posted by Truth1000
What will be the real "breakthrough" that we really need is to not only see the anatomy, but the physiology. When we have the ability to take these images and discern the plaques' inflammatory status, we'll have the Golden Bullet we've been dreaming about for decades.
All plaques are not created equal. Some small plaques, with significant inflammatory components, can be viewed as essentially negative because they are less than 50%, but can rupture and produce sudden cardiac death just days later. That is why cardiac C-Reactive Protein tests have become so helpful.
When the imaging shows us the patho-physiology of the anatomy, it will be as much of a leap forward as when Dr. Roentgen accidentally discovered his "X" rays in his office in Wurzburg, Germany!


Truth1000.....

An enormous amount of plaque characterisation work has already been done via the new LightLab Frequency Domain Optical Coherence Tomography technology.

Here's a link to the compendium encompassing that plus other information.

Please see chapter 3 for the studies & other info pertaining to plaque characterisation.

www.lightlabimaging.com...

Kind regards
Maybe...maybe not

[edit on 2-7-2010 by Maybe...maybe not]



posted on Jul, 2 2010 @ 04:17 AM
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reply to post by IgnoreTheFacts
 


IgnoreTheFacts…..



Amazing tech!


Yes, it is!


I put the first IVUS intravascular systems into cardiac labs & I thought that was incredible technology.

LightLab OCT technology just smashes it!



Have had my share of heart work done


Well, I hope you’re OK matey!



I am always interested in current medical technology.


We have also just launched another new cardiac technology about which I might write.

You might also be interested to know that Optical Coherence Imaging is being used for advanced medical imaging in other areas of clinical applications including gastroenterological imaging, dermal imaging, etc…... I note OCT is already well established for ophthalmic imaging. There has also been some development in the dental imaging area, but some of the dental results have been overstated. We are also partnered with the company that leads the way in some of these other areas. That might also make for an interesting thread.



I even got my cardiologist to give me a copy of the data from of my test they did in the cath-lab. Unfortunately I can't read it and don't have the program, but if I open some of the folders I can access some sort thumbnails with images of my heart and the wire thingy going through it.


It could be they have given you image files that require a DICOM viewer. Can you see any reference to that or the file type?



Medical technology always amazes me.


Me too!


That’s why I love my job…..I get to travel the world to find the newest medical technologies & then work with some of the top Doctors & Professors in the world to implement this new technology!

Actually, I do that in between reptilian & chemtrail threads!




But I'll tell ya what, after what I have been through I would be more than happy to never have the need for such technology to be used on me!


Yeah…..I often think about that when I’m involved with all this stuff. I think…..”geez…..not me, thanks!”

Just in case you are interested, here are some other threads I established in this medical forum regarding a few of the new medical technologies I am involved with.

NanoKnife: Cancer Breakthrough Without Radiation or Drugs

A New Technology For Eliminating Re-Blockage of Coronary Arteries

Unbelievable New Miniaturised Kidney Dialysis Technology

Kind regards
Maybe…maybe not



posted on Jul, 10 2010 @ 10:54 PM
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I am impressed indeed MMN. We are lucky to have you here so we can

get a look at all the new toys out there in MedRus-land!

Thank you so much for sharing!



posted on Jul, 10 2010 @ 11:05 PM
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Originally posted by KIZZZY
I am impressed indeed MMN. We are lucky to have you here so we can

get a look at all the new toys out there in MedRus-land!

Thank you so much for sharing!


KIZZZY my friend!

I appreciate your kind & positive words!


This medical technology area is truly fascinating.

I'm glad you find it interesting.

Kind regards
Maybe...maybe not



posted on Sep, 2 2010 @ 08:24 PM
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Outstanding!

Can an extra little 'arm' scraper sample collector be fitted under the eye to grab cell samples while it's in there?



posted on Sep, 2 2010 @ 08:37 PM
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Interesting. I was hoping it would be a replacement for the Echo since it's getting harder and harder to get a clear picture on me when I go in for my yearly cardiology appointment. However, this should be in most hospitals by the time I have to go to the cath lab again, so I guess that's a plus.



posted on Sep, 3 2010 @ 05:26 AM
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Originally posted by IgnoranceIsntBlisss
Outstanding!

Can an extra little 'arm' scraper sample collector be fitted under the eye to grab cell samples while it's in there?


IgnoranceIsntBlisss....

How are ya' me ol' mate?

I think that would be extraordinarily difficult to implement.

Tell me.....

Why do you ask that?

What do you have in mind?

Kind regards
Maybe...maybe not





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