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Immigrant farm workers' challenge: Take our jobs

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posted on Jun, 26 2010 @ 11:40 PM
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Farm workers are tired of being blamed by politicians and anti-immigrant activists for taking work that should go to Americans and dragging down the economy, said Arturo Rodriguez, the president of the United Farm Workers of America.
So the group is encouraging the unemployed — and any Washington pundits or anti-immigrant activists who want to join them — to apply for the some of thousands of agricultural jobs being posted with state agencies as harvest season begins.
All applicants need to do is fill out an online form under the banner "I want to be a farm worker" at www.takeourjobs.org..., and experienced field hands will train them and connect them to farms.

source:news.yahoo.com...

This is nice news for all people who were complaining about loosing their jobs to the immigrants. Now you have a chance to apply for these jobs at www.takeourjobs.org...

I have seen many people infuriated on immigrant situation here on ATS so I'm guessing almost all of you who were complaining about it will apply for job.

Word of advise from the article


Those who have done the job have some words of advice for applicants: First, dress appropriately.
During summer, when the harvest of fruits and vegetables is in full swing in California's Central Valley, temperatures hover in the triple digits. Heat exhaustion is one of the reasons farm labor consistently makes the Bureau of Labor Statistics' top ten list of the nation's most dangerous jobs.
Second, expect long days. Growers have a small window to pick fruit before it is overripe.
And don't count on a big paycheck. Farm workers are excluded from federal overtime provisions, and small farms don't even have to pay the minimum wage. Fifteen states don't require farm labor to be covered by workers compensation laws.


So any takers?




posted on Jun, 26 2010 @ 11:45 PM
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i think its awesome that these illegal aliens have the resources to launch this PR campaign......

"disclaimer this is sarcasm"

~meathead


edit to add disclaimer

[edit on 27-6-2010 by Mike Stivic]



posted on Jun, 26 2010 @ 11:48 PM
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also to add..

i worked on a 5th generation family owned farm(not my family i was an employee) i got paid minimum wage and did the work with a smile..you know why?...


because I LOVED IT..
U2U me for farm name for verification...

~meathead



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 12:00 AM
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reply to post by Crimson_King
 


What the article fails to mention is that one in five illegals work in construction, which represents five times the number working in farm jobs.

From another source: "Locally, many inspectors, construction foremen and union organizers estimate that in the last few years they have come to represent anywhere from half to 90 percent of the work force at residential job sites in the Puget Sound region. They dominate unskilled-labor crews and are prevalent among drywallers, framers, roofers and other semiskilled trades."

"And it's an open secret that many of these workers are here illegally."

"The article went on to say, "Using census data, the Pew Hispanic Center, a nonpartisan research group in Washington, D.C., estimates that nationwide about one in five illegal residents works in construction — five times the number working in farm jobs."

So llegals ARE taking away skilled and unskilled jobs from Americans in the construction industry that are needed by American citizens.


Source: nafbpo.org...

[edit on 27-6-2010 by manta78]



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 12:03 AM
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I am not saying that Illegal immigrants are not taking our jobs..

what im saying is this ridiculous idea that americans are not willing to do this type of work is a carefully propogated excuse to allow them to stay...


~meathead



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 12:23 AM
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reply to post by Crimson_King
 


That's very interesting. Unfortunately, illegal immigrants do not harvest the lettuce here in Arizona (where most of the lettuce comes from in the winter for the entire USA). Our crops are picked mostly by permanent legal residents and immigrants brought into the US on a work visa. I am sick and tired of hearing the same old slop about how lettuce will shoot up to $15 a head if the illegals all leave.

Also, these immigrants should be careful what they wish for:




January 24, 2010 9:55 PM
BY JAMES GILBERT, SUN STAFF WRITER

Every season Yuma-area harvesting and produce-packing companies worry whether they will have enough hands to harvest their valuable crops of fruits and vegetables.

One way these employers have been getting those "hands" is through the H-2A temporary agricultural worker program, which allows them to bring foreign workers in from Mexico to harvest their fields...

...Duron explained that in order for Yuma-area harvesting and produce-packing companies to get temporary seasonal workers through the H-2A program, they first must file a petition with the U.S. Department of Labor indicating that there are not sufficient workers who are able, willing, qualified and available to do the job.

"Before they can hire temporary workers, the employers must have first tried to hire U.S. workers to fill the jobs," Duron said.

Duron said there are fewer migrant workers this year compared to last year because fewer acres of produce were planted this year and more domestic workers have returned to the field due to the poor economy....


www.yumasun.com...

Those poor, poor abused and oppressed people. I wonder how much they make?


....Flores said he earns about $400 a week, less than in past years when he could take home $500 weekly.

www.yumasun.com...

Recently unemployed American citizens who are on unemployment in AZ get a max of $260 on unemployment. These guys are bringing in nearly twice that...Not to mention...


Duron said companies that hire migrant workers through the program are required to provide them with free housing, a minimum wage of $8.70 an hour, free transportation back and forth from the work site and $9.90 a day for food.

www.yumasun.com...

The horror! 400 bucks a week! No rent! No utility bills! No transportation costs! Food costs subsidized - if not covered! What a bunch of crybabies.

Well, if I become unemployed, I will be heading to the fields. Thanks for the link!


[edit on 27-6-2010 by azguyblahblah]

[edit on 27-6-2010 by azguyblahblah]



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 12:23 AM
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from source


To highlight how unlikely the prospect of Americans lining up to pick strawberries or grapes, Comedy Central's "Colbert Report" plans to feature the "Take Our Jobs" campaign on July 8.

The campaign is being played for jokes, but the need to secure the right to work for immigrants who are here is serious business, said Michael Rubio, supervisor in Kern County, one of the biggest ag producing counties in the nation.


Sounds like this more about a laugh than anything. Stephen Colbert at his best.



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 12:33 AM
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reply to post by jam321
 


yes but when it comes to MSM is it not wise to ask:


Is the campaign an excuse for a laugh?

OR??

Is the laugh an excuse for a campaign?

~meathead



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 12:35 AM
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I haven't been following what wages are for tobacco cutters here in Kentucky, recently, but about 8 years ago, a good tobacco cutter could earn around 13 dollars an hour cutting and sticking tobacco. That of course, depends on the cutters speed. 13 cents a stick, and about 100 sticks per hour. Pretty good wages for a few weeks during the season. It's hard and hot work though. And a cutter can get sick from all that exposure to the fresh tobacco juice. Along came some Mexicans who were willing to work for 11 cents a stick and had no overhead. Of course the farmers would hire the Mexicans. They worked just as hard as the regular seasonal workers. The regular workers had families and a house to pay for, or at least an apartment to pay rent on. The Mexicans had family they send money home to, but no rent to pay. They live in a shed or barn on a farm during the cutting season. It's rather difficult for an American to take back these jobs from the immigrant seasonal workers. If they worked harder and faster, yes, they get more money. But consider they were already working at pretty much maximum capacity as it is.

I have noticed a recent trend, though. Less Mexican immigrants in my area. I don't know why, but it's quite obvious.

Man, though, those Mexican workers sure do work hard, though. I admire them for their stamina and ability to adapt quickly to work conditions.

Thinking back to last August when I had a new metal roof put on my house. The employees were Americans. By 1 PM, they were through. Too hot up there for them to continue. But at the same time, I could see Mexicans doing construction labor nearby and they worked damn near until sundown, right through the heat of the day.



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 12:36 AM
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reply to post by Mike Stivic
 


True. And on a side note, some states such as Colorado are now using prisoners for farm labor to replace work formerly done by illegals.



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 12:44 AM
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Originally posted by kyred
I haven't been following what wages are for tobacco cutters here in Kentucky, recently, but about 8 years ago, a good tobacco cutter could earn around 13 dollars an hour cutting and sticking tobacco. That of course, depends on the cutters speed. 13 cents a stick, and about 100 sticks per hour. Pretty good wages for a few weeks during the season. It's hard and hot work though. And a cutter can get sick from all that exposure to the fresh tobacco juice. Along came some Mexicans who were willing to work for 11 cents a stick and had no overhead. Of course the farmers would hire the Mexicans. They worked just as hard as the regular seasonal workers. The regular workers had families and a house to pay for, or at least an apartment to pay rent on. The Mexicans had family they send money home to, but no rent to pay. They live in a shed or barn on a farm during the cutting season. It's rather difficult for an American to take back these jobs from the immigrant seasonal workers. If they worked harder and faster, yes, they get more money. But consider they were already working at pretty much maximum capacity as it is.

I have noticed a recent trend, though. Less Mexican immigrants in my area. I don't know why, but it's quite obvious.

Man, though, those Mexican workers sure do work hard, though. I admire them for their stamina and ability to adapt quickly to work conditions.

Thinking back to last August when I had a new metal roof put on my house. The employees were Americans. By 1 PM, they were through. Too hot up there for them to continue. But at the same time, I could see Mexicans doing construction labor nearby and they worked damn near until sundown, right through the heat of the day.


I don't appreciate your "Americans are lazy" stereotype. I work construction, and I work hard all day, and I produce quality work. I have worked with many lazy illegals in the past who put out crap workmanship, when not finding a place to hide in the shade. It goes both ways.

PS - Those American workers who stopped working at 1pm were probably union guys


[edit on 27-6-2010 by azguyblahblah]



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 06:57 PM
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I see the sarcasim in the OP. And it really pisses me off.
The only Americans I know who would not take these jobs are the far left liberals who think that the 50% paying taxes in this country should support every one else or those that have been sponging off the system for years any way.
If I were without work I would take any job that would feed me and my family.



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 03:42 PM
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I signed Up... I need a job. I'll let ya'll know what happens.




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