2-BE or not 2-BE. The Deadly Secrets of Corexit Dispersant

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posted on Jun, 10 2010 @ 09:07 AM
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BP, the US government, and possibly even Evergreen has sprayed at least a million gallons of Corexit dispersant on the spill.




The Evergreen Supertanker 747 may fly over the Gulf Coast in coming days, dropping a substance that could break up oil that threatens to damage the coastline.

“These substances typically require light coverage, about 5 gallons per acre,” Baynes said. “With our plane’s capacity, we could lay a line 200 feet wide and 300 miles long.”

www.wacotrib.com...

Now, the EPA knows exactly what chemicals are in Corexit, because they are monitoring them.




EPA’s TAGA bus is now monitoring the air along the Gulf Coast for two chemicals found in the COREXIT dispersants: 2-BE (2-butoxyethanol), and dipropylene glycol mono butyl ether, which have the highest potential to get into the air in any significant amounts. EPA has been monitoring for these chemicals since May 18, 2010.

www.epa.gov...

So, let's take a look at the results.

Here's May 25th, one month into spill.



Now, take a look at June 6th results



The 2-butoxyenthanol, , appears to be rising quite significantly.


According to the National Ambient Volatile Organic Compounds Database
(Shah and Singh, 1988), the average daily home indoor air concentration of 2-butoxyethanol is 0.214 ppb (1.0 µg/m3)

ntp.niehs.nih.gov...

Now, the detection limit for 2-BE in the June 6th sample was .7 ppb. One reading was
9.4 ppb. That's 13 times the detection limit.

Shouldn't someone be sounding the alarm, or at least give out a public safety alert?



In addition to being found in the COREXIT dispersants, these compounds are found in cleaning products and coatings. As a result, we may not be able to identify the source of the measured compounds. The very low levels we are seeing suggest that the use of dispersants on the oil spill is currently having an insignificant impact on air quality on land.
www.epa.gov...


Uh huh.


[edit on 10-6-2010 by OurskiesRpoisoned]




posted on Jun, 10 2010 @ 09:33 AM
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ANNNNDDDDDD let the Chemtrial posts begin !


Well look at the bright side...
At least they are actually making a decent effort to stop the oil from causing more serious harm. Although enough damage has already been done, due to prolonged action by the US AND BP.

God I hope BP pays for this, dearly.



posted on Jun, 10 2010 @ 09:58 PM
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reply to post by Jordan_The_Maori
 


Well, I think chemtrails are a different thing. But I do think the oceans are full of the chemicals from them.

It's possible that the dispersant and the chemicals from the chemtrail fallout could combine for some new form of killer bacteria.



posted on Jun, 12 2010 @ 07:36 AM
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The TAGA data hasn't been updated since June 6th, the day I posted this thread.

6 days, no air quality data? Yet before I posted this thread, data had been posted daily since May 25th. ???


[edit on 12-6-2010 by OurskiesRpoisoned]



posted on Jun, 14 2010 @ 11:07 AM
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Originally posted by OurskiesRpoisoned




I find this data to be highly suspect, as this table shows amounts detected that are below the detection limit. It is impossible to detect anything below the detection limit (that's why it's called the detection limit).
This indicates that either the detection limits are far lower than stated in this table, or that the numbers representing the amounts detected are just made up.

Edit: a third possibility is that the "detection limit" row is in a different rate of measurement (ppbv) than the rows representing the amounts detected (rate of measurement isn't labeled in these rows) . This makes these types of charts impossible to read without doing the math to convert these rows into like terms(which is impossible without knowing the rate of measurement for the samples). This makes these types of charts very difficult for the average layperson to interpret..

Edit:


Notice on this second chart that all the numbers listed are higher than the detection limit for 2-butoxethynol, but ND (none detected) for 1-(2-Butoxy-1-Methylethoxy)-2-Propanol, because it was below the detection limit...

[edit on 6/14/2010 by nasdack24k]

[edit on 6/14/2010 by nasdack24k]



posted on Jun, 14 2010 @ 11:18 AM
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Originally posted by nasdack24k

Originally posted by OurskiesRpoisoned




I find this data to be highly suspect, as this table shows amounts detected that are below the detection limit. It is impossible to detect anything below the detection limit (that's why it's called the detection limit).
This indicates that either the detection limits are far lower than stated in this table, or that the numbers representing the amounts detected are just made up.

Edit: a third possibility is that the "detection limit" row is in a different rate of measurement (ppbv) than the rows representing the amounts detected (rate of measurement isn't labeled in these rows) . This makes these types of charts impossible to read without doing the math to convert these rows into like terms. This makes these types of charts very difficult for the average layperson to interpret..

[edit on 6/14/2010 by nasdack24k]


Nice catch. If you look, the detection limits are change everyday. It kind of smells like someone is posting random numbers, and didn't even see the detection limit.

Something stinks.



posted on Jun, 14 2010 @ 11:21 AM
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reply to post by OurskiesRpoisoned
 


Exactly.
If I were submitting fraudulent data to the public, I'd at least make sure to have "detected" numbers that can actually be detected..
This is really just sloppy spooking.

[edit on 6/14/2010 by nasdack24k]



posted on Jun, 14 2010 @ 12:12 PM
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Originally posted by OurskiesRpoisoned
The TAGA data hasn't been updated since June 6th, the day I posted this thread.

6 days, no air quality data? Yet before I posted this thread, data had been posted daily since May 25th. ???


[edit on 12-6-2010 by OurskiesRpoisoned]


I'm not at all in the loop about what's going on down there, but these tests were being done to measure the components of COREXIT in the air, right? Is it possible that they stopped spraying it and that's why they stopped testing?
This is completely just a guess. Perhaps someone knows?



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 06:39 AM
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Didn't know if anyone had posted this or not, but I found I link with some of the ingredients of corexit.

www.ufppc.org...

I don't think I've seen it anywhere else. All I know is a decent number of people around here are having symptoms of exposure (not trying to fear monger, just stating facts!), including myself.. Here's hoping it's just a summer time bug!



posted on Jul, 24 2010 @ 07:19 PM
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BP Rep Responds to Dispersant Use in the Gulf


At the Joint Incident command center for the BP Oil Volcano a BP representative came down to speak with citizens concerned about the use of dispersant. ~ download

www.stopgulfoildisaster.org...

www.labucketbrigade.org...

Eni Petrolium is an integrated energy company. Active in 77 countries, with a staff of 78,400 employees, it operates in oil and gas exploration, production, transportation, transformation and marketing, in petrochemicals, oilfield services construction and engineering.

Mo'Fo'
Check arsenic .16ppm look up safe levels 0.01 See special handleing
www.epa.gov...





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