It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Worlds best survival tool - is this thing invented yet??

page: 1
2
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on May, 19 2010 @ 12:27 PM
link   
I've had an idea for quite a few years for a layered-metal device that would take moisture from the air naturally due to the ionaztion of the materials used to create it. I sort of assumed this already exists.

This morning I was thinking of the same device but that you could increase the electric charge to take more water out, or still work in low-humidity areas.

So... a hand generator connected to layered metal to take water out of the air

but, I can't find it anywhere!! Has anyone ever heard of this, or seen one??




posted on May, 19 2010 @ 12:33 PM
link   
There are some pretty small dehumidifiers or the fancy term "atmospheric water generators" out there. I dont believe any are dynamo or solar powered but it shouldnt be a difficult thing to hook up. Depending on the humidity in the air you could be cranking away for an awful long time with little reward.

Go for it. Make a buck. You can buy advertising time on GCN right after the Ecoloblue people.



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 12:34 PM
link   
reply to post by Thermo Klein
 


Not sure I understand how it would work? There are currently models that can create condensation with cooling plates and a collector, but I don't understand how the electrically charged plates would remove water? Can you explain the science behind it?



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 12:35 PM
link   
You don't mean that thing that was featured in NEXUS magazine a few years back? I can't remember the name of it but you might want to check back issues on their website? If I find it I post the name and details.



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 12:37 PM
link   
It sounds like a good idea that you have. I don't know about the device that you speak of, however there is this:


Water, Water, everywhere; nor any drop to drink. The plight of the Ancient Mariner is about to be alleviated thanks to a firm of eco-inventors from Canada who claim to have found the solution to the world's worsening water shortages by drawing the liquid of life from an unlimited and untapped source - the air.

The company, Element Four, has developed a machine that it hopes will become the first mainstream household appliance to have been invented since the microwave. Their creation, the WaterMill, uses the electricity of about three light bulbs to condense moisture from the air and purify it into clean drinking water.

The machine went on display this weekend in the Flatiron district of Manhattan, hosted by Wired magazine at its annual showcase of the latest gizmos its editors believe could change the world. From the outside, the mill looks like a giant golf ball that has been chopped in half: it is about 3ft in diameter, made of white plastic, and is attached to the wall.

It works by drawing air through filters to remove dust and particles, then cooling it to just below the temperature at which dew forms. The condensed water is passed through a self-sterilising chamber that uses microbe-busting UV light to eradicate any possibility of Legionnaires' disease or other infections. Finally, it is filtered and passed through a pipe to the owner's fridge or kitchen tap.

The obvious question to the proposition that household water demands can be met by drawing it from the air is: are you crazy? To which the machine's inventor and Element Four's founder, Jonathan Ritchey, replies: 'Just wait and see. The demand for water is off the chart. People are looking for freedom from water distribution systems that are shaky and increasingly unreliable.'

For the environmentally conscious consumer, the WaterMill has an obvious appeal. Bottled water is an ecological catastrophe. In the US alone, about 30bn litres of bottled water is consumed every year at a cost of about $11bn (£7.4bn).

According to the Earth Policy Institute, about 1.5m barrels of oil - enough to power 100,000 cars for a year - is used just to make the plastic. The process also uses twice as much water as fits inside the container, not to mention the 30m bottles that go into landfills every day in the US. But the mill also has downsides, not least its $1,200 cost when it goes on sale in America, the UK, Italy, Australia and Japan in the spring. In these credit crunch times that might dissuade many potential buyers, though Ritchey points out that at $0.3 per litre, it is much cheaper than bottled water and would pay for itself in a couple of years.

There is also the awkward fact that although there is eight times more atmospheric water than in all the rivers of the world combined, it is unevenly distributed. Those areas of the US that are most desperate for more water - such as the arid south-west where ground water levels are already dramatically depleted - have the lowest levels of moisture in the air.

The mill ceases to be effective below about 30 per cent relative humidity levels, which are common later in the day in states such as Arizona. To combat that problem, the machine has an intelligent computer built into it that increases its output at dawn when humidity is highest, and reduces it from mid-afternoon when a blazing sun dries the air.

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.
Source: www.guardian.co.uk...

I realize that it does use electricity, though very little but it is still a draw-back.

--airspoon

[edit on 19-5-2010 by airspoon]



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 12:42 PM
link   
I've definitely heard of dehumidifiers that have a "collection tank" that you have to change (by dumping out the water) periodically. So that's pretty much it. The real question is could one be battery-powered, energy efficient, and reasonably portable.

While we're talking about futuristic survival gadgets, what I always thought would be cool for cold climates is essentially a portable, battery-powered open microwave emitter. It could be a bit dangerous if used improperly, but on a hypothermia victim it very well could be a lifesaver.



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 12:45 PM
link   
reply to post by Thermo Klein
 


In theory ionized water molecules are combustable under pressure...i.e. combustion engine!
screw survial get rich!



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 12:47 PM
link   
I'm busy with what I have going on and am a proponent of free information so here's what I'm thinking - anyone feel free to run with it if we can't find anything other than the $1,500 atmos plug-in water generators.

Needed:
A copper sheet (easy to get, thermally reactive, +2 ion charge, cheap, excellent conductivity) [Copper info here]

A sheet of tin or some other -x charge metal that's cheap and easy to get, while not being corrosive to copper.

Putting these two together should allow a natural electric current causing more condensation to be created on one surface. The attracting surface would be on the non-sun side, maybe inside of a 4-walled small pyramid shape? foldable for easy carrying and storage. And then just place a cup under it to collect the water.

Even a cup of water a day can significantly increase your life expectancy in a NO clean water situation.




[edit on 19-5-2010 by Thermo Klein]



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 12:47 PM
link   
I've seen something a bit less technically sophisticated that does the same thing and more, and it's been in use for centuries.

Deep in rural Mexico, the locals employ a thick wooden beam, perhaps 18 inches square by about 30 feet long, that is buried vertically deep into the earth, so that only about 8 feet of it is left above ground. It forms the central support member of a wooden roof surrounded by adobe walls.

This wooden beam remains not just cool but cold regardless of the outdoor temperatures, which often climb above 100° F... The interior of the house remains in the low 70s all the time, although they have no electricity nor refrigeration. The wooden beam also causes atmospheric humidity to condense on its surface, which can be collected in various ways.

Rather ingenious.

— Doc Velocity




[edit on 5/19/2010 by Doc Velocity]



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 12:48 PM
link   
reply to post by NewlyAwakened
 


Everything mentioned above works off the concept of "cooling" the air to condensate the water. Ionization and metal plates is not the reason for any of these things to work. It may help purify the water, and if the metal plates are cold, they could serve as the condensation method, but it is still necessary to cool the air.

Also, if we are dehumidfying the air in our home to collect the water, we are going to have a lower relative humidity, and a higher evaporation rate, which means although we are able to drink more water, we are going to lose it that much faster and have a net zero effect. If we are not in the home, then we won't have the electricity required to run the cooling equipment.



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 12:52 PM
link   
reply to post by Thermo Klein
 


There are much simpler ways to collect a single cup of water.

1. Dig a hole and place a cup in the hole. layer large leaves or plastic sheeting over the hole, and place a rock on the layer directly above the cup. Water condensates on the underside and drips into the cup.

2. Collect green foliage, place in a plastic bag and hang in the sun. Snip off the bottom corner of the bag and place a cup below it. The sun will evaporate water from the foliage, condensate it on the plastic and gravity will bring it to your cup.

3. For Sea Water, you need a little more equipment, but you can still evaporate the sea water and collect the condensation without electricity, or metal, or artificial cooling.



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 12:55 PM
link   

Originally posted by airspoon
It works by drawing air through filters to remove dust and particles, then cooling it to just below the temperature at which dew forms. The condensed water is passed through a self-sterilising chamber that uses microbe-busting UV light to eradicate any possibility of Legionnaires' disease or other infections. Finally, it is filtered and passed through a pipe to the owner's fridge or kitchen tap.


This (just below dew point) is the general scientific idea behind what I was thinking except if you use an electric charge instead of cooling to attract the water condensation you don't need to filter it because it's just pure water that condenses (hopefully, it's a work in progress).

The ionization would act as a natural temperature differential working the same way as a powered cooler, without power.

[edit on 19-5-2010 by Thermo Klein]



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 01:16 PM
link   

Originally posted by getreadyalready
Everything mentioned above works off the concept of "cooling" the air to condensate the water. Ionization and metal plates is not the reason for any of these things to work. It may help purify the water, and if the metal plates are cold, they could serve as the condensation method, but it is still necessary to cool the air.


The working aspect of this is the dew point. An artificial dew point can be produced by the change in electricity (on the surface, not the ambient air). Finding two metals that can both create a charge together and a dropped dew point should allow easy collection of water.



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 01:29 PM
link   
reply to post by getreadyalready
 


Like this?


I think having a pre-made device would be more comfortable due to the expectation you're always going to have some water. those are good ideas though! Great to have both



**

By the way - what happened to ATS Survival section??


[edit on 19-5-2010 by Thermo Klein]



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 01:35 PM
link   
A refrigerated air conditioner is almost as efficient as the dehumidifiers and is much cheaper. The electricity needed to extract water from air is too expensive for any large scale use. If you made a small unit that you turned a crank to compress the refrigerant you would have to crank all day to get a cup of water.



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 02:20 PM
link   
What you are speaking of is called an electrical thermocouple.

Two conductors made of dissimilar metals are connected to each other, forming the thermocouple.

When the thermocouple is heated it produces electricity, when electricity is sent through the thermocouple, it absorbs heat.

When it absorbs heat, because it is cooler than the surrounding air, moisture in the air condenses on it, provided the temperature of the thermocouple is below the dew point.



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 02:34 PM
link   

Originally posted by getreadyalready
reply to post by Thermo Klein
 
There are much simpler ways to collect a single cup of water.

1. Dig a hole and place a cup in the hole. layer large leaves or plastic sheeting over the hole, and place a rock on the layer directly above the cup. Water condensates on the underside and drips into the cup.


The nice thing about this method is I always carry some plastic sheeting with me anyway when I enter the wilderness, so it's nothing extra to carry. Actually it's a pocket raincoat, it would double as a water collection sheet if I ever needed it. It's really compact, light, and easy to carry.

Conversely, the hand-cranked water generator would be one more gadget for me to take along and I take along too much stuff already, I'm trying to cut back what I take with me, not add more.



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 03:37 PM
link   
reply to post by Thermo Klein
 


Actually that diagram is even better than my idea!


Putting the bag over a live tree's foliage would get you more water, possibly even a continuous supply from the trees root system until the foliage overheats and dies, and then you just switch limbs.



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 04:45 PM
link   

Originally posted by butcherguy
What you are speaking of is called an electrical thermocouple.


Sweet! Yet again I thought of something that's aready been created


Any idea if having just the thermocouple would be enough to gain any usable amount of water?

or can you recommend what metal would be a good pairing for copper?

thanks Butcherguy!



posted on May, 19 2010 @ 05:28 PM
link   
Have you ever seen this?? - www.ecoloblue.com...
It is an Atmospheric Water Generator



new topics

top topics



 
2
<<   2 >>

log in

join