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Fans Asked to Remove Pro-Arizona Law Shirts Druing NBA GAME

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posted on May, 18 2010 @ 10:40 AM
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The Daily Caller


Two fans at a Phoenix Suns basketball game were ejected from their first row seats and removed from the arena last week after refusing orders from security guards to take off their shirts in support of Arizona’s recently passed law against illegal immigration.

One of the fans, businessman Jim Clark, said he and a friend, who were wearing orange shirts that read “Viva Los 1070,” eventually were allowed to return to their seats during last Wednesday’s game against the San Antonio Spurs after speaking with a security director.

This is not the first occurrence of politics creeping into the Suns basketball games: On Cinco de Mayo, team owner Robert Sarver came up with the idea for the team to wear “Los Suns” on their jerseys in protest of the immigration law. That’s what drove Clark to don his own shirt.


They were eventually allowed back into the game after 30mins of missing some front row seats action. Once they were allowed in they were greeted with cheers and high fives. Does this show the owners of Suns who comes to attend their games?

One of the fans mentioned that it was TNT's decision for them to be removed from their seats if they decided not to remove their shirts, and TNT later denied such a decision. In the end the decision required a higher authority as 4 security officers were dispatched to Front Row Seat Ticket Holders in a Play Off game, those are not some meager tickets. These guys surely have some pull than the average fan.


- The offending shirt (Courtesy of Daily Caller)



+4 more 
posted on May, 18 2010 @ 11:15 AM
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reply to post by prionace glauca
 


The Phoenix Suns need to stay the hell out of the politics arena! So tired of hearing their opinion on matters that have nothing to do with basketball. This isn't the first time they've had political messages mixed within their franchise, just the most well known so far. I personally don't like the bill either but not because I give a crud about illegal immigrants though. But the Suns have done a great job of alienating a large portion of their fan base with these moves and I for one will NOT be watching any of their games in the Western Finals after they've stuck their nose where it doesn't belong! S+F

Edit for S&G.

[edit on 18-5-2010 by Redwookieaz]



posted on May, 18 2010 @ 11:26 AM
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Politics has no place in sports, period... as much as I don't think TNT or the Sun's ownership have any right to tell these gentlemen that they need to take off their t-shirts, I think these guys really need to cool off and just enjoy the game, regardless of what bone-headed statements come out of an owners mouth...

Oh well, not like it matters. This story will die a quick death once the Lakers sweep the Suns anyway



posted on May, 18 2010 @ 11:29 AM
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I agree that politics don't belong in pro-sports, however, it was Mr. Clark who interjected his political leanings into the arena. From a security standpoint, I could understand where the concern was. With that being said, he should be able to wear whatever he wants to wear and I can't believe that it was ever even an issue. The security should have just made appropriate adjustments to deal with any security threats... while at the same time respecting their fans' rights. Just my 2 cents.

--airspoon

[edit on 18-5-2010 by airspoon]



posted on May, 18 2010 @ 11:31 AM
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I use to like the suns, till they became racists political bigots i can't watch that worthless league any longer.

Nash=Bigot



posted on May, 18 2010 @ 11:34 AM
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I totally agree with politics need to be kept out of not only sports but all entertainment platforms. These platforms should be executed without bias.

Look at just how Phil Jackson approached the issue initially, and now he is being called a racist for it.



posted on May, 18 2010 @ 11:52 AM
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As another poster said, I can understand the concern as far as security goes had some other fans [after a few beers] who were against the law decided to take issue with the guys in the shirts. However, removing them was a pre-emptive action as there is no way to really tell if a scuffle or all out brawl were to occur.

Bottom line is their freedom of speech was violated.

My ONLY problem is when people use their freedom of speech to purposefully stir up trouble. You gotta be responsible with your rights. With that said, regardless of what I think of their decision to wear the shirts, they are allowed to do so without recourse.

edit: clarification

[edit on 18-5-2010 by nunya13]



posted on May, 18 2010 @ 11:54 AM
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Originally posted by nunya13
As another poster said, I can understand the concern as far as security goes had some other fans [after a few beers] who were against the law decided to take issue with the guys in the shirts. However, removing them was a pre-emptive action as there is no way to really tell if a scuffle or all out brawl were to occur.

Bottom line is their freedom of speech was violated.

My ONLY problem is when people use their freedom of speech to purposefully stir up trouble. You gotta be responsible with your rights. With that said, regardless of what I think of their decision to wear the shirts, they are allowed to do so without recourse.

edit: clarification

[edit on 18-5-2010 by nunya13]


So Freedom of Speech supporting the Illegals is OKAY..


and

Freedom of Speech Supporting LAWS that already exist but no one cares to read is considered bad, very bad, mucho mal.


[edit on 18-5-2010 by prionace glauca]



posted on May, 18 2010 @ 12:26 PM
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God, give it up. Who cares! These two boneheads shouldn't be showing up wearing those shirts in the first place, it's a basketball game not their local political rally. Especially a team that is known to voice their opinion in backing the Hispanic community. If they don't like it, then don't show up or support the team. That simple.

Really, it's the media's fault for all of this. They're the one's who keep trying to push on the players and GM's. They keep asking them for their opinion like it should matter really. I'm glad Phil Jackson tried to stay out of the argument as long as he could but seriously, it was like everyday that they kept asking him about the Arizona law. Everytime, I was like, "Please Phil, don't say anything stupid. Don't make us look bad," and he didn't. Not like it was a surprise. That's why I like Phil, he's a straight, to the point, non bullshi**er.

Anyway, sports is our sanctuary to get away from all this crud and it's the last place I want to see it. The media, and the two boneheads who wore those shirts are just instigating cr*p. Those "Los" shirts are nothing new. A lot of teams have worn them and if you think they're being worn solely by the Suns and against the new law then you're mistaken. A lot of teams have worn them on "Latin nights" and other celebrations. I don't know how it is for other teams but here in LA, hispanics are obviously a large portion of the Lakers fan base. So, it's nothing new but I'm sure the obvious people will be using it as another attack.



posted on May, 18 2010 @ 12:39 PM
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who cares? the guy who posted 3 paragraphs.

that being said if the suns can come out and wear jerseys in support of something, fans should be able to wear shirts in opposition to it.

fair is fair.



posted on May, 18 2010 @ 01:01 PM
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reply to post by prionace glauca
 


Did you not notice I was AGREEING WITH YOU?

Being against the law is not the same as supporting 'Illegals' in much the same way as being against the PATRIOT Act does not support terrorists/terrorism and is a straw man argument.

If you portend to equate my being against the AZ law with being for 'illegals', then you are severely mistaken and making false accusations while assuming you know what my 'real' intentions are. Don't put words into my mouth.



posted on May, 18 2010 @ 01:54 PM
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I find this reprehensible. Freedom of Speech is a paramount fundamental of our country. Regardless if it was a sports venue, political rally or PTA meeting, people have a right to express their opinion.

No matter which "side of the aisle" you're on or which "team you're rooting for" a shirt or a shout or a sentence should be protected.
(Of course there will always be exceptions like a threat or implied threat of violence or vulgarity and profanity.)

Granted emotion and passions are at a fever pitch on this controversial topic, but I do find this extreme censorship troubling and unacceptable.

BTW, hat tip to OP on proper quote usage.



posted on May, 18 2010 @ 01:56 PM
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Originally posted by kinda kurious

BTW, hat tip to OP on proper quote usage.


Thanks for chiming in m8.

BTW, hat tip for the bipartisan response and correct understanding of the quotes.


I just don't like to see entertainment venues be used for politics. Freedom of speech no matter what shape or form it comes in should be respected. These individuals were not just any fans, I am sure this is going to played out more even after the NBA season is over.

TNT and The Franchise owner stepped over the bounds with this one.

[edit on 18-5-2010 by prionace glauca]



posted on May, 18 2010 @ 02:49 PM
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reply to post by kinda kurious
 


Our 1st Amendment only protects us from government intrusion on our right to express ourselves not necessarily to protect us from expressing ourselves whenever or wherever we want. For instance, if you come into my home, I can order you to not speak of something and you can either abide or you can leave. The 1st Amendment doesn't protect your rights to speak whatever you want, whenever you want.

With that being said, I'm not so sure that tax-dollars didn't pay for that arena, which makes it a public space, at least in part and therefore free speech should not be impeded. Maybe someone else has more insight as to whether tax-dollars were used for this particular venue. If tax-dollars were used, then people should be protected by their 1st Amendment rights, however if it is a completely private arena (which I doubt), then the team should be able to make the rules that it wants, regardless of whether we agree with them or not. Again, our Bill of Rights doesn't tell us what we can do, rather it tells government what they can't do.

As much as I don't like their response to this incident, if it is a private venue, even if by lease, then they have the right to make whatever rules they choose and you have the right to not support them through your patronage.

Just my 2 cents.

--airspoon

Edited for grammar.

[edit on 18-5-2010 by airspoon]

[edit on 18-5-2010 by airspoon]



posted on May, 18 2010 @ 02:59 PM
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Freedom of speech. Let's see...were the two fans being in any way disruptive? Waving placards? Throwing things? Waving those asinine thundersticks? No? They were wearing shirts?

How dare they. If the Suns management doesn't want this stuff, they shouldn't have had the team wear those jerseys...or had the players keep their mouths shut. What were they expecting? No problem with them making the statement, just they shouldn't act surprised, or get angry, when there is a response.

As for separating sports and politics? It ain't never gonna happen.

Olympics in 1936. 1972. 1980. 1984. The soccer war in south america. ...and on and on and on. If anything, they move in lockstep.



posted on May, 18 2010 @ 03:12 PM
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reply to post by airspoon
 


Even if it is in a private venue, I will bet you that a lawyer would
have a plausible defense for his client's use of those t-shirts, if no signs or notices were in that private venue, warning that such activity (displaying t-shirts of a political nature etc. is not acceptable within the premises) Seen it happen too many times, that "rules", unless clearly posted, won't pass a court challenge. Wondering if it will get that far?

If they file suit against the stadium, and I was on that jury, the
stadium would lose, assuming no signs were posted.



posted on May, 18 2010 @ 03:16 PM
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reply to post by manta78
 


Your absolutely right because the ticket purchased is considered a contract. With that being said, I'm sure that the lawyers for the team/venue have it in writing somewhere in very small print, that they reserve the right to void the contract for whatever reason.

Lawyers make everything so complicated but they do tend to cover their butts and the butts of their clients.

--airspoon

[edit on 18-5-2010 by airspoon]



posted on May, 18 2010 @ 04:48 PM
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Screw em. Does anyone still watch thugball these days anyway? Eject the team and dont give them a chance to make another dime from the citizens of Arizona. Nothing but criminals playing this game these days.



posted on May, 18 2010 @ 04:54 PM
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why cant the America people vote on a law to banned any celebrations In the united states unless its part of America



posted on May, 18 2010 @ 05:04 PM
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Basketball!!! I have never heard or seen of a sport more suited to the camp and peculiar type man. A sport? Only in America!

Any game in which two men line up on opposite sides is rarely free from political motives. So to say a team need to stay away from politics undermines the aspect of competition. (If you can call basketball a competition or sport or entertainment)

"In basketball and In politics, stupidity is not a handicap." (adjusted quote, - Napoleon Bonaparte



[edit on 18-5-2010 by C11H17N2NaO2S]




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