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U.N. chief shocked by shrinking lake

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posted on Apr, 5 2010 @ 08:40 AM
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U.N. chief shocked by shrinking lake


www.msnbc.msn.com

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon on Sunday called the drying up of the Aral Sea one of the planet's most shocking disasters and urged Central Asian leaders to step up efforts to solve the problem.

Once the world's fourth-largest lake, the sea has shrunk by 90 percent since the rivers that feed it were largely diverted in a Soviet project to boost cotton production in the arid region.

The sea's evaporation has left layers of highly salted sand, which winds can carry as far away as Scandin
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Apr, 5 2010 @ 08:40 AM
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This here is making alot of news
For once I agree with this idiot Ban Ki Moon.

I find it interesting that's it the climate change evangelist who is putting the spotlight on this issue, but so far it hasn't been portrayed as a global warming issue.

But I do agree, it is definately an issue.
Though I wish I could go there with a metal detector like.... NOW, but something definately needs to be done.

The war of waters coming soon?

www.msnbc.msn.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Apr, 5 2010 @ 09:24 AM
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I am still upset the landbridge from North America to Asia got flooded over a 100,000 years ago!

Where was the U.N. then I tell you!

Can you imagine how many times over millions of years the topography of the earth has changed?

It’s true as a species we are invasive and parasitical in nature, but that is the nature of the beast.

Here in Florida the Everglades were largely drained back in the 60’s and 70’s, partially filled in, other parts diverted and since then climatologists and enviromentalists have stated that it has destroyed the natural ecosystem and watershed and will have a devastating long term impact.

Of course they eventually decided to spend billions of dollars to buy out the mostly sugar farmers who started working the reclaimed land. Of course U.S. Sugar is about the most heavily government subsidized agricultural segment that there is.

The funny thing is that the rains do keep coming, and no real shortage of water exists, and the parts of the Everglades left unmolested are still naturally supporting wildlife and even new invading species.

So are they restoring the Everglades really for the ecosystem, or are they restoring the Everglades to give the Sugar growers one last big fat subsidy by buying out their lands and facilities for 100’s of times what they are actually worth?

Where environmental concerns are concerns I think it’s a wise idea to follow the money.

Yes I am sure that people living along this lake have seen their way of life disappear, but how many of them are there and were there, compared to how many people that are being supported by the diverted water?

Ultimately there is always a tradeoff, and if this lake proves to be anything like the everglades, restoring it, will be a big cash cow, for the very same factions who profited off of diverting it.



posted on Apr, 5 2010 @ 09:44 AM
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I think the other thing you might want to investigate here as well, is that as we move into the brave new world of Carbon Credits and Green Energy, the dry lakebed of this leg would potentially be a huge source of Lithium.

Lithium is almost always found under the salty surfaces of dried lake beds, in a crust below the salt in briny ground water.

Two of the biggest sources of Lithium in the world are very remote and hard to access. The biggest output comes from Brazil, with locations in Peru and Bolivia having huge deposits, but very hard to ship out of their mountainous remote locations.

Of course like anything else the elites love to monopolize the scarcer that they can make it, the more expensively they can sell it.

Lithium batteries have the biggest current potential out there to eventually be able to power things like automobiles.

Do they in reality want to fill this lake back up, because it could be one of the biggest and easiest places to extract lithium from?

The whole Carbon Credit Scam relies on major developed countries utilizing more than their fare share, and then having to pay less developed countries for the Carbon Credits that they don’t need or use, on an international exchange run by the International Banking Cartel.

The more expensive you can make alternative energies, the more likely it is developed countries will use traditional energies that create carbon emissions and the more likely they will pay top dollar then for the Carbon Credits when they exceed their normal allotment.

To my knowledge the U.N. has never done anything for truly altruistic purposes or reasons and I would not expect them to be doing so here.



posted on Apr, 5 2010 @ 09:48 AM
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Well, it does mention the problem didnt start, till the russians dug trneches basically, to divert the water elsewhere. Myabe they shuol just simply refill those diversion lines, see if the lake stops disappearing. All started as soon as man interveened with it. put it back!



posted on Apr, 5 2010 @ 10:19 AM
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I've read a lot about Aral sea before. Here's more articles on it:

englishrussia.com...

www.cnn.com...

news.bbc.co.uk...

It is a man made catastrophe accelerating already fast desertification.

I used to have lots of pictures of nearby cosmodrome and bioweapons storage facilities from some Russian sites, lost them though
.



posted on Apr, 5 2010 @ 10:25 AM
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Originally posted by ziggy1706
Well, it does mention the problem didnt start, till the russians dug trneches basically, to divert the water elsewhere. Myabe they shuol just simply refill those diversion lines, see if the lake stops disappearing. All started as soon as man interveened with it. put it back!

I think that would be almost impossible now. Even if man does refill it with some magic (some weather control techniques) it won't be the same lake with same flora and fauna. I think Aral sea is beyond hope, but what can be done is preventing future catastrophes... though, I don't see any improvement in that department either.



posted on Apr, 5 2010 @ 10:42 AM
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Originally posted by ProtoplasmicTraveler
I think the other thing you might want to investigate here as well, is that as we move into the brave new world of Carbon Credits and Green Energy, the dry lakebed of this leg would potentially be a huge source of Lithium.

Lithium is almost always found under the salty surfaces of dried lake beds, in a crust below the salt in briny ground water.

Two of the biggest sources of Lithium in the world are very remote and hard to access. The biggest output comes from Brazil, with locations in Peru and Bolivia having huge deposits, but very hard to ship out of their mountainous remote locations.


So you're saying that the US "California or Utah SALT Flats" could be potentially a lithium goldmine? I wouldn't try to drag this story into the whole "Climate change and Global Warming" bit. The Soviets tried to create a workers paradise and in the process destroyed some of their environment.

This is just yet another example of the Soviet Style of mismanagement. I remember reading about this situation back in the 1980s and how this would some day be an environmental disaster.


Well that day is here.
It's not like nobody knew about it then.
They didnt do anything about it.



posted on Apr, 5 2010 @ 11:12 AM
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Very well could be unfixable by now. But hey they have an obligation to at least try witha fight. Not trying is giving up without a fight. Got nothing too lose. I look at it this way, you broke it, you fix it* fair anough



posted on Apr, 5 2010 @ 11:17 AM
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Yes, and let's also hear from all those members that seem to lament the downfall of the soviet union.

The same soviet union that also brought the world other ecological disasters such as Chernobyl.

The truth is that the soviets never cared what effects there might be from any of their actions on their people, or the planet.



[edit on 4/5/2010 by centurion1211]



posted on Apr, 5 2010 @ 11:17 AM
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reply to post by ModernAcademia
 



UFOs been sucking up the lake water.

Shocked? He should be more shocked at the fraudulent act of US government printing more money in Trillions.



posted on Apr, 5 2010 @ 11:57 AM
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Originally posted by ProtoplasmicTraveler
I am still upset the landbridge from North America to Asia got flooded over a 100,000 years ago!

You might want to talk to a dr. about that.


Where was the U.N. then I tell you!

Not existing yet, but the slow, and natural occurences during the time period you mentioned helped start the timeline that eventually brings you the UN.


[Can you imagine how many times over millions of years the topography of the earth has changed?

You mean the very slow changes that all occurred naturally as the Earth saw fit?


[It’s true as a species we are invasive and parasitical in nature, but that is the nature of the beast.

We are also blessed with teh capabilities to recongize our issues and change them.


[Here in Florida the Everglades were largely drained back in the 60’s and 70’s, partially filled in, other parts diverted and since then climatologists and enviromentalists have stated that it has destroyed the natural ecosystem and watershed and will have a devastating long term impact.

Of course they eventually decided to spend billions of dollars to buy out the mostly sugar farmers who started working the reclaimed land. Of course U.S. Sugar is about the most heavily government subsidized agricultural segment that there is.

The funny thing is that the rains do keep coming, and no real shortage of water exists,


Yes, the amount of water doesn't change.But the type and quality of water does.


and the parts of the Everglades left unmolested are still naturally supporting wildlife and even new invading species.


Invading species means that an ecology has been weakened and is allowing invasive species in. And wildlife existing somewhere doesn't meant the ecology is healthy. That is like saying a game preserve in Africa that has elephants going beserk from lack of space is a a healthy ecology and everything is just fine.


So are they restoring the Everglades really for the ecosystem, or are they restoring the Everglades to give the Sugar growers one last big fat subsidy by buying out their lands and facilities for 100’s of times what they are actually worth?
They could just pay the money to the sugar growers.


[Where environmental concerns are concerns I think it’s a wise idea to follow the money.

Most environmental concerns are caused by money, poor planning, and greed. Which end up costing a lot of money to fix. Superfund sites are perfect examples of someone having to spend a lot of money to clean up someone's mess that wanted to save money. But it doesn't mean that it isn't an environmental catastrophe.


Yes I am sure that people living along this lake have seen their way of life disappear, but how many of them are there and were there, compared to how many people that are being supported by the diverted water?

Ultimately there is always a tradeoff, and if this lake proves to be anything like the everglades, restoring it, will be a big cash cow, for the very same factions who profited off of diverting it.


This was the fourth largest lake in the world. Have any idea how big that is. Just slightly smaller then the Great Lakes.

Now the Great Lakes in the US, because of their size, affect the weather of the entire US. To say there is a tradeoff is sticking your head in the sand and trying to pretend there isn't a problem.

If suddenly lake Michigan were drained, that would be an epic disaster. The loss would be in-describable, the affects on environment and jobs would be radical.

But since this is happening an another area that doesn't affect you, you write it off as no big deal.

How sad.



posted on Apr, 5 2010 @ 06:42 PM
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There has been a load of documentaries about the Aral Sea going back years. It should all be in the UN archives, since it was a man made disaster 30 or more years ago.



posted on Apr, 6 2010 @ 12:27 AM
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reply to post by centurion1211
 


Back in the 1980s when this potential disaster was first brought to light in the American Media the Soviets vigorously protested and countered then claimed it was just stupid American Propaganda.

Well...

The Soviets are gone and evidently the lake is nearly gone.





[edit on 6-4-2010 by SLAYER69]



posted on Jul, 3 2010 @ 03:03 PM
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another article on this with more photos in the UK today:
daily mail



posted on Jul, 3 2010 @ 03:33 PM
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[edit on 3-7-2010 by JBA2848]



posted on Jul, 3 2010 @ 04:14 PM
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One has to laugh at the headline UN SKOCKED lol, I mean did he not get the MEMO about it before they decided to pull the plug. The UN overseas the ongoing deception of the world and blatantly pretends to be concerned about the people of the earth while doing everything they can to kill us off!

Don't believe me? so why is it whenever the UN send their forces anywhere, rape, murder, organised crime, people trafficking, child abuse and the like increase to a level only seen in the Vatican!



posted on Jul, 3 2010 @ 04:17 PM
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Originally posted by spacedonk
another article on this with more photos in the UK today:
daily mail


While the article has some interesting data, and the pictures are interesting, it seems more like a propaganda piece for global warming. Combined with fear mongering about water supplies.

-----------------------------------------------------------

Do you not get the feeling that we are being set up for some kind of water resource metering and taxation? It is going to be turned into the next "gold": a highly prized rarity that people will use as the standard.

Think about it: if oil is going to be pushed to the wayside, what other liquid gold can be used to drive an economy?

Water is only scarce because we over source it. Urbanization is the culprit.

I live in the desert, and we have plenty of water. There are still idiot who water their lawns when it is 110 outside. No restrictions around here, where it barely rains.

Did anyone else see that Colbert Report where that guy came on with this box that could turn just about anything liquid into potable water? He said you could take a brackish sea water, mix it with urine, and his box would filter it for drinking water that is RO quality? He was talking about going to Africa with this technology to help villages there who are finding water hard to come by.

Where the hell is that device? They filterd some nasty water on TV, and then drank it. The technology exists to make this whole thing needless.



posted on Jul, 4 2010 @ 07:10 AM
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They call a sea, a lake. Nice way to downplay the extend of the disaster.



posted on Jul, 4 2010 @ 08:19 AM
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Originally posted by SLAYER69

Originally posted by ProtoplasmicTraveler





So you're saying that the US "California or Utah SALT Flats" could be potentially a lithium goldmine? I wouldn't try to drag this story into the whole "Climate change and Global Warming" bit. The Soviets tried to create a workers paradise and in the process destroyed some of their environment.

This is just yet another example of the Soviet Style of mismanagement. I remember reading about this situation back in the 1980s and how this would some day be an environmental disaster.


Well that day is here.
It's not like nobody knew about it then.
They didnt do anything about it.


That one i can answer and its a yes but its Calif and Nevada.
Searles dry lake in Calif has a lot of lithium.
Searles Lake, California (a former location of lithium production) has large chemical plants that process soda ash and other brine chemicals and could be modified to restart lithium production without a large capital outlay of money.

and Nevada
www.westernlithium.com...
www.manta.com...
www.ibtimes.com...



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