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Cyberattack Drill Shows U.S. Unprepared

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posted on Feb, 17 2010 @ 05:59 PM
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Cyberattack Drill Shows U.S. Unprepared


www.informationweek.com< br />

Imagine what would happen if a massive cyberattack hit the U.S., crippling mobile phones and overwhelming both telephone infrastructure and the electricity grid.

"Cyber Shockwave," conceived and executed by the Bipartisan Policy Center along with experts in cybersecurity, simulated such an attack on Tuesday - and discovered that the U.S. is ill-prepared to handle a large scale cyberattack.
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
topnews.us
www.pcworld.com
www.thenewnewinternet.com
www.infowars.com

Related AboveTopSecret.com Discussion Threads:
Internet Urgently Needs More Regulations, Speaker Says
It's official: A Corporation is running for Congress!
Cyber ShockWave Hits Washington
Controlling the Internet




posted on Feb, 17 2010 @ 05:59 PM
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Surprise, surprise.

The drill showed exactly what it was designed to show, and did what it was supposed to do - scare people into accepting a controlled, regulated and censored Internet.

Note that the Bipartisan Policy Center is "an insider think-tank stacked with neocons, neolibs, death merchants, and spook corporations," according to Kurt Nimmo, who is probably right.



Concerned citizens may want to attend and ask why the government and an insider think-tank stacked with neocons, neolibs, death merchants, and spook corporations are pushing a largely contrived threat on the American people.

Insiders, Neocons Plan Simulated Cyber Attack




Expect the "Cyber-Attack Report" to be pitched as the "Gold Seal" reference for upcoming FCC review of the Internet. ...It's already being used in Brussels:



Today in Brussels, 500 delegates from 25 countries are meeting at a conference organized by the EastWest Institute to discuss ways to enhance cybersecurity on a global scale. John Mroz, president and CEO of the EastWest Institute, said in an email to the Pittsburgh Tribune Review “Cyberspace today is like the Wild West.” Cyberspace “does not enjoy the international community’s setting of basic agreements, rules and procedures.”

World Leaders Meet to Develop Cybersecurity Plan




Also note: "the international community’s setting of basic agreements, rules and procedures” have NOTHING to do with national security, personal safety, human rights, civil rights or anything at all except TRADE - and the goal of harmonizing agreements, rules and procedures is to make global trade easy, and allow for global corporate government.



The Bipartisan Policy Center's Cyber-Attack drill was designed to fear-monger - and the fear-mongering is all about garnering public support to force the FCC into defining the Internet as a "commercial service" with corporate filters and censors instead of an unfiltered, uncensored "universal service" - and to force the world into accepting corporate coltrol of the Internet.

There are two options on the table with the US FCC:

A. If the FCC defines the Internet as a "universal service," it will not be filtered and censored.

B. If the Internet is defined as a "commercial service," then media corporations will have the Right to censor and filter whatever they like in order to a) maximize profits; and b) exercise their Rights to Freedom of Speech and of the Press.

I pick option A.


FYI - Remarks on Internet Freedom, Hillary Rodham Clinton, US Secretary of State



Now, in many respects, information has never been so free. There are more ways to spread more ideas to more people than at any moment in history. And even in authoritarian countries, information networks are helping people discover new facts and making governments more accountable.

During his visit to China in November, for example, President Obama held a town hall meeting with an online component to highlight the importance of the internet. In response to a question that was sent in over the internet, he defended the right of people to freely access information, and said that the more freely information flows, the stronger societies become. He spoke about how access to information helps citizens hold their own governments accountable, generates new ideas, encourages creativity and entrepreneurship. The United States belief in that ground truth is what brings me here today.

Because amid this unprecedented surge in connectivity, we must also recognize that these technologies are not an unmitigated blessing. These tools are also being exploited to undermine human progress and political rights. Just as steel can be used to build hospitals or machine guns, or nuclear power can either energize a city or destroy it, modern information networks and the technologies they support can be harnessed for good or for ill. The same networks that help organize movements for freedom also enable al-Qaida to spew hatred and incite violence against the innocent. And technologies with the potential to open up access to government and promote transparency can also be hijacked by governments to crush dissent and deny human rights.

In the last year, we’ve seen a spike in threats to the free flow of information. China, Tunisia, and Uzbekistan have stepped up their censorship of the internet. In Vietnam, access to popular social networking sites has suddenly disappeared. And last Friday in Egypt, 30 bloggers and activists were detained. One member of this group, Bassem Samir, who is thankfully no longer in prison, is with us today. So while it is clear that the spread of these technologies is transforming our world, it is still unclear how that transformation will affect the human rights and the human welfare of the world’s population.

On their own, new technologies do not take sides in the struggle for freedom and progress, but the United States does. We stand for a single internet where all of humanity has equal access to knowledge and ideas.






Other resources;
www.reclaimthemedia.org...
Define Freedom of the Press: Is the InterNet the New Press?









www.informationweek.com< br /> (visit the link for the full news article)


ed to tweak

[edit on 17-2-2010 by soficrow]

[edit on 18-2-2010 by soficrow]



posted on Feb, 18 2010 @ 08:42 AM
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reply to post by soficrow
 


Sometimes I will like to see what will happen for the new generation dependent on modern gadgets what they will do if one day they go without them.

For people like me a littler bid older and that still remember when life was more simple and slower this will be a nice brake from fast living environment.



Still the nation will fall into chaos but we will survive.



posted on Feb, 18 2010 @ 10:56 AM
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Originally posted by marg6043
reply to post by soficrow
 


Sometimes I will like to see what will happen for the new generation dependent on modern gadgets what they will do if one day they go without them.

For people like me a littler bid older and that still remember when life was more simple and slower this will be a nice brake from fast living environment.




Oh marg. I grew up on a farm in the sticks and went to a one room school. (Really!) The only library I saw for the first 12 years of my life was the size of a coat closet. I read every book I could find a hundred times and memorized the flippin' dictionary out of pure desperation.

...I used to dream about libraries - my first (and best) OBE's took me to libraries. 'Twas most joyful...

The past ten-odd years I've been equally isolated (by illness and disability). But this time around, I've got the Internet. The best thing I've ever had.

No way will I give it up without a fight.


...Yes, we will survive without a Free Web - but it's not only the best thing that ever happened to me, it's the best thing that ever happened for ALL the people in the world.

We can start here to protect our turf, and then move on.



- sofi





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