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New Nova Can Be Seen With Binoculars

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posted on Jan, 18 2010 @ 12:48 PM
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Apparently there has been a new nova discovered that can be seen without any expensive telescopes, they say it can even be seen with a pair of binoculars, ...

Observing Alert: Possible Nova in Ophichus

Are you ready for some excitement that won't take an observatory telescope to spot? Then get out your binoculars, because according to CBET 2128 there's a new object showing its stuff off in the constellation Ophiuchus…
******SKIPP******
it's rather rare that an object of this type can easily be observed with even the most modest of equipment. Magnitude 8.4 is easily within reach of small binoculars, and given that most of the world isn't having the best of luck with weather, you may be one of only a few who get to see it! Use this map to get you in the general area….
******SKIP******
(Hint: Look for obvious star patterns that are easy to see, like the group of stars that seems to resemble Orion's belt and sword just below the target area.)


There is a couple of star maps on the link above that can further refine the area that this nova has sprung up in to help you zero in on the nova,

According to Wikipedia, this is one of the brightest novas since 1890!

Bright novae since 1890

[edit on 1/18/2010 by Keyhole]




posted on Jan, 18 2010 @ 01:13 PM
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reply to post by Keyhole
 


Awesome, I love the stars, I wish I could go look at it, but its been raining for 2days and it wont stop till then end of the week.

Oh well, thanks for post.

Namaste



posted on Jan, 18 2010 @ 07:36 PM
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Originally posted by Keyhole

According to Wikipedia, this is one of the brightest novas since 1890!

Bright novae since 1890


Er, no. Unfortunately, the higher the magnitude number, the fainter the object. Magnitude +8.4 is dimmer than anything on that list - It's roughly the same brightness (dimness?) as the planet Neptune. On a really dark night (no Moon & far from city lights), the human eye can see objects as faint as magnitude 6 - roughly the same brightness as the planet Uranus. Of course, in a city you're lucky to see past 3rd magnitude.


Thanks for posting the list, though. I haven't seen a nova since 1975. Obviously I need to pay more attention!



posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 12:17 PM
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Originally posted by Saint Exupery

Originally posted by Keyhole

According to Wikipedia, this is one of the brightest novas since 1890!

Bright novae since 1890


Er, no. Unfortunately, the higher the magnitude number, the fainter the object. Magnitude +8.4 is dimmer than anything on that list -



Oooops, my bad!

Didn't know that, thanks for the correction.



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