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Darpa: U.S. Geek Shortage Is National Security Risk

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posted on Jan, 16 2010 @ 12:01 AM
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This is actually not a new initiative...

NEWS: A Unique Opportunity: Pentagon Funds Screenwriters Conference

Took me a bit to find...




posted on Jan, 16 2010 @ 12:28 AM
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reply to post by ModernAcademia
 


I have been in IT for more than 10 years now...when I was the most capable, they made me train an Indian replacement for my job. I did not lose my job, but I was not allowed to do "hands on" work any more but had to "delegate". 95% of IT people in my company were let go, now cheap Indian workforce replaces them. Outsourcing is the big word of the decade. I say USA government DELIBERATELY creates less qualified IT workers, as they are trying to level the world...and to prove the point of "multicultural" progress.
Now, Indian people are really nice. They are really good on all support functions, maintenance, even some "on the go" development. I am yet to meet an Indian developer, PROGRAMMER, who would impress me. Maybe it is just the nature of the jobs their companies have trained them for, but that is my experience. Chinese are very much the same, only I think Indians have better education.
A lot of US programmers were happy to take management roles, and the new talent has never been created. This has done, in my mind, a lot of damage. The culture of programming is a fragile one...one generation gap is too much.

Young people know how hard it is to learn computer science, and how hard it is to get a good job, and...they know about OUTSOURCING!!!



posted on Jan, 16 2010 @ 12:43 AM
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Originally posted by herbivore
I say USA government DELIBERATELY creates less qualified IT workers, as they are trying to level the world...and to prove the point of "multicultural" progress.

Perhaps, but you gotta admit parents paved the way for govt.
Parents are very much part of the problem


Originally posted by herbivore
I am yet to meet an Indian developer, PROGRAMMER, who would impress me. Maybe it is just the nature of the jobs their companies have trained them for, but that is my experience.

I've interviewed and employed many american programmers
the ones that I interviewed didn't know nearly as much as their CV indicated

the one's I've employed... well alot of them aren't programmers as much as a bunch of code-manipulators that would go to online programming forums, ask for help and even ask for written code and then modify it for their usage.

These days in North America as a whole, finding good programmers that can create something as simple as classes and understands object oriented programming or even component oriented is as difficult as can be.
However finding foreigners that can do so isn't that difficult.

This is undebatable. Perhaps your company's budget only allowed for a cheap consultancy firm in India made up of mostly students or really "green" developers.


Originally posted by herbivore
A lot of US programmers were happy to take management roles, and the new talent has never been created. This has done, in my mind, a lot of damage. The culture of programming is a fragile one...one generation gap is too much.

I agree the new talent has not been created but I disagree that one generation gap is too much because that statement is only applicable to North America.


Originally posted by herbivore
Young people know how hard it is to learn computer science, and how hard it is to get a good job, and...they know about OUTSOURCING!!!

im' sorry but majoring in ANY field is hard
as far as i'm concerned computer sci. is easier than many other fields and let's face it has so much demand.



 
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