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Your TV Set Might Be Doing Very Strange Things

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posted on Dec, 22 2009 @ 01:19 AM
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I had an interesting thought ( smell something burning LOL ). In the video below we have learned some very strange stuff about what an electron does when not being observed. An electron is fired by an electron gun threw a double slit then hits a target or in this case a screen the marks the action of the electron. An electron is like a very small marble but as the Dr Quantum video below will show, the electron acts differently when being observed.


Now. A CRT (Cath Ray Tube) or picture tube in your TV set does the same thing being done in this experiment. A classic color TV tube has 3 electron guns that simply fire off electrons (at precise times ). An Electron has a negative charge. So,inside the big glass tube we need a positive charge to attract the electron toward the screen we see in the front of the CRT. The electron is then defected by a device called a yoke to change the angle of the electron stream or beam. The positive charge is produced by a device called a flyback transformer. It simply attracts the flow of the electrons.

Next, the electrons go threw what is called a shadow mask. ( It looks just like the screen on your screen door only stiffer. ) and then finaly the electrons hit the screen. The screen is made of colored phosphor coated on the back side of the glass you look at. Red, Blue and Green in precise pattern. If you were to look very very closely at the screen of your TV well it is on you will see the pattern of the colored phosphor. NOT FLAT SCREEN SETS.


So what all this would seem to imply is this. If the electrons striking our TV screens take on the property's of a wave action when we (the observers ) are out of the room and not observing our turned on TVs, What are they doing?????




[edit on 22-12-2009 by intothelight]




posted on Dec, 22 2009 @ 01:32 AM
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What are they doing?

Selling Viagra to OTHER people?



posted on Dec, 22 2009 @ 02:02 AM
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There is no tv.

Are you bringing up the Schrodinger's cat thing?

Uncertainty ftw

en.wikipedia.org...ödinger's_cat



posted on Dec, 22 2009 @ 11:09 AM
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Originally posted by Mr Headshot
There is no tv.

Are you bringing up the Schrodinger's cat thing?

Uncertainty ftw

en.wikipedia.org...ödinger's_cat


Thanks guys
No, what I am thinking is: just like in the experiment the electrons would act as an interference pattern well not being observed. So the picture on the TV would be obscured. The Experiment and a CRT seem to me to very close in there layout.



posted on Dec, 22 2009 @ 11:22 AM
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If you put a camera on the tv when you are out of the room,. you will get a video of the tv playing. Would a non living camera count as an observer?
On an interesting note, you video a computer you get a jumpy screen from the pixels.

[edit on 22-12-2009 by amatrine]



posted on Dec, 22 2009 @ 03:41 PM
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Originally posted by amatrine
If you put a camera on the tv when you are out of the room,. you will get a video of the tv playing. Would a non living camera count as an observer?
On an interesting note, you video a computer you get a jumpy screen from the pixels.

[edit on 22-12-2009 by amatrine]


A camera acts as an observer, so that wouldn't work.



posted on Dec, 23 2009 @ 10:54 AM
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reply to post by amatrine
 


This is because the human eye sees at 60 frames per second. Most cameras record at less than 60 frames per second. That's why you see the jumpy screen.



posted on Dec, 26 2009 @ 04:54 AM
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reply to post by DaMod
 
the human eye can see more than 60

go watch a 120hz tv and notice how its smoother



posted on Dec, 26 2009 @ 07:52 AM
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Eh...

Electrons are not matter , the video got it wrong. Actually we do not fully know what the electrons are.

And the changed behaviour because of the "observer" . It could be interference from the detection equipment, changing some parameters in the space-time continuum , changes we cant see yet but electrons do behave different because of it.

Maybe they should do the experiment again with Hydrogen nucleons ?

[edit on 26-12-2009 by Romanian]



posted on Dec, 26 2009 @ 11:51 AM
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I don't think it's true that the electrons in the double slit experiment are acting differently just because they are being observed. It's more the case of "we don't understand the actions of electrons" that is causing that odd outcome -- it's not our observation that is causing it.

It's like that old joke about the guy who tells his doctor: hey doc...every time I touch my knee it really hurts."
To which the doctor replies: "Then don't touch your knee!"

Obviously it's not "touching the knee" that is the problem. The problem is with the knee itself, even though the doctor doesn't see it that way.

There is more to the behavior of these electrons than "our observation", but we don't have enough understanding to explain it.

[edit on 12/26/2009 by Soylent Green Is People]



posted on Dec, 26 2009 @ 12:02 PM
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A camera acts as an observer, so that wouldn't work.


How so?
Isn't THAT the important question here?


"Observing", as the term is usually understood, implies consciousness (which doesn't necessarily equal sight). Doesn't it?
If it doesn't... WHAT, then, qualifies as "observing"?

(And to all those "diagonal" readers who may be reading this: no, I did not mean to imply that a camera is somehow spookily "conscious".)






[edit on 26-12-2009 by Vanitas]



posted on Dec, 26 2009 @ 12:31 PM
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Originally posted by DaMod
reply to post by amatrine
 


This is because the human eye sees at 60 frames per second. Most cameras record at less than 60 frames per second. That's why you see the jumpy screen.


Any type of monitor has to have a setting of at least 70 mhz for it to even be comfortable with my eyes. Anything less and it will give me a headache.



posted on Dec, 26 2009 @ 01:48 PM
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Originally posted by Vanitas



A camera acts as an observer, so that wouldn't work.


How so?
Isn't THAT the important question here?


"Observing", as the term is usually understood, implies consciousness (which doesn't necessarily equal sight). Doesn't it?
If it doesn't... WHAT, then, qualifies as "observing"?

(And to all those "diagonal" readers who may be reading this: no, I did not mean to imply that a camera is somehow spookily "conscious".)

[edit on 26-12-2009 by Vanitas]


Well, one thing we sure do need here is more info. I am going to look around an see if anybody is doing any experiments on the rule of the Observer. Here is a strange thought, If the observer is a recording device watching the experiment , then at what point does the result of the experiment change do to the observation? Does the device doing the recording record an interference pattern and only change when someone views the recorded device info??. I know this, if I were a scientist I sure would want to find out the role and components of the "observer" or observation



posted on Dec, 26 2009 @ 10:00 PM
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So in the other thread we (as in the superior race of Swedes) have taken a picture of an electron for the first time. The question is, am I changing the picture by observing it?



posted on Dec, 27 2009 @ 06:53 AM
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reply to post by LeaderOfProgress
 


MHz? Really? As in 70*10^6 Hz? That's one hell of a monitor. Maybe your electrons are multiplying while you're not watching?




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