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List of Animals Threatened by Climate Change

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posted on Dec, 10 2009 @ 11:06 PM
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reply to post by Doglord
 


Sadly I believe the tiger population is currently too small to begin farming them. In addition, this would be sort of inhumane, although one must weigh the benefits of preserving the species. Unfortunately, in places where tigers would be able to be farmed in Asia, I don't think that the tradition of poaching will disappear so easily in lieu of any alternative.




posted on Dec, 10 2009 @ 11:10 PM
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When did global warming become climate change?
And correct me if I'm wrong but don't animals "die out"not because of climate change but due to their lack of ability to adapt?I wonder if you could put on your college debate hat and tell us what species are thriving due to "climate change".You do study it "with your life".



posted on Dec, 10 2009 @ 11:15 PM
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reply to post by genius/idoit
 


It depends what type of climate change you are referring to. Increased temperatures are helping fast numbers of arthropods, specifically insects, which thrive in warmer environments. I would also suggest that various species of reptiles and amphibians are thriving, however invasive species, disease, and deforestation is balancing this out.

They do go extinct because of their inability to adapt. It seems that they are unable to adapt as quickly as their environment is changing.

Being rude isn't flattering. You could have just asked without the sarcasm.



posted on Dec, 10 2009 @ 11:27 PM
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reply to post by ravenshadow13

I do expect replies saying "climate change isn't real and you're an idiot."

Climate change is real and you're not an idiot.


Sorry, but that had to be said...

My question to you, ravenshadow13, is what would you have humans do? You state that we affect other species negatively. This is true enough. However, so do other species affect each other negatively. Unlike other species, we also have positive effects on our animal co-inhabitants.

At one time the eagles went extinct in this area. Now eagles soar aloft... thanks to a conservation program that released them back into the wild.

How many shelters across the country rescue animals form certain death?

How many zoos are actively engaged in conservation?

How many birds and other wildlife are saved each year by concerned individuals?

How many animals are protected species, illegal to hunt or trap?

Now ask yourself how many other species consciously do anything to preserve biodiversity. The answer is none; all other species are interested in their own survival and their own survival only.

In short, I do not dispute you on the fact that our actions have consequences on other species... I only ask what you believe should be done about it.

One other note: 'Climate change' is to me (and to many other who frequent these boards) synonymous with 'Global Warming'. You did mention that 'climate change' was the reason for the possible extinction of these animals.

As a matter of fact, you put it in the thread title!

TheRedneck



posted on Dec, 11 2009 @ 08:10 AM
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reply to post by ravenshadow13
 


Your right,sorry about being rude.I was expecting more than just your average man is responsible for killing animal thread.you know the dinosaurs went extinct with no help from us at all.



posted on Dec, 11 2009 @ 10:37 AM
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Originally posted by ravenshadow13
reply to post by Doglord
 


Sadly I believe the tiger population is currently too small to begin farming them. In addition, this would be sort of inhumane, although one must weigh the benefits of preserving the species. Unfortunately, in places where tigers would be able to be farmed in Asia, I don't think that the tradition of poaching will disappear so easily in lieu of any alternative.


Nonsense, with the right economic incentives it would be worthwhile to increase the population through artificial insemination. Given the ability to purchase or lease breeding age females from zoo's, coupled with tiger's rapid growth there would be less than a 2-3 year turn around between insemination and a mature enough juvenile to harvest pelts from. Add inthe revenues from tiger meat in the gourmet market, as well as legal sales of bones,claws,etc in the Asian market, and it would be a highly profitable operation which could rapidly increase tigers in the wild.



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