Real Hope For MS Sufferers.

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posted on Nov, 23 2009 @ 09:10 AM
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www.ctv.ca...

Link to a series of videos detailing the research, the back story and the hopeful prospects for MS sufferers.

As opposed to this link which details how many people suffer from MS and how much money drug companies can make off of them through currently accepted treatment protocols.




[edit on 23/11/2009 by kosmicjack]




posted on Nov, 23 2009 @ 09:46 AM
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reply to post by kosmicjack
 


I've been trying to tell my doctors this.. that I had a neck/spinal injury but they keep assuring me it's not connected (even though symptoms started not long after I was injured). I do have lipping on x ray but because it's not severely missaligned they dismiss it but every MS attack I have had had begun with a neck pain. This really does make sense as perhaps I had blood vessel damage as well or maybe the lipping is effecting icirculation. Doctors tend to dismiss the little things.


thanks for posting this.



posted on Nov, 23 2009 @ 09:51 AM
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reply to post by kosmicjack
 


Kosmicjack,

This research is legit! I am a clinician and just last week I visited one of my colleagues in Minneapolis. Interestingly, we talked about this very subject! They had a patient that was diagnosed with MS several years ago. For this patient they cleared out blockage and placed stents in each of their left and right carotid arteries about a month ago. Prior to the surgery the patient had been having more frequent debilitating flare-ups. Since the surgery they have not had a single attack - lets keep our fingers crossed.

The other, more important aspect of this, I feel, is that although this is considered an unapproved procedure for MS, the insurance company paid for it because it was treated as a cardiovascular disease. Basically, you are cleaning out "clogged" arteries - which IS covered by insurance. You are probably familiar with how expensive the current medication treatments are. As you touched upon earlier, since current understanding is that MS is an autoimmune disorder, the current FDA-approved meds work by altering one's immune response.

I always wondered what medical problems we could solve if we required a head-to-toe MRI, CAT scan, etc. with some level of frequency (ex - every 5 yrs after age 30, etc.). I personally feel many people can catch diseases in their infancy, plus doctors would have a wealth of physical data that may help. Unfortunately though, the technology is still expensive and so is not covered by insurance companies unless other "tried and proven" treatments have been exhausted.

Best of luck and well wishes to all you MS sufferers out there! Hope is definitely here!

Blu



posted on Nov, 23 2009 @ 09:51 AM
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reply to post by riley
 


Me too! And it all makes sense now doesn't it!?

When you try to make that correlation to a doctor they just give you that look of disdain and take a completely dismissive attitude as if we couldn't possibly know what's up with our own bodies.



posted on Nov, 23 2009 @ 09:53 AM
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Thought you were talking about those who still choose Windows machines as opposed to a Linux OS.

Thanks for sharing this.



posted on Nov, 23 2009 @ 10:02 AM
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Originally posted by kosmicjack
www.ctv.ca...

Link to a series of videos detailing the research, the back story and the hopeful prospects for MS sufferers.

As opposed to this link which details how many people suffer from MS and how much money drug companies can make off of them through currently accepted treatment protocols.

amen to that. My drug is already payed for but full price is over 1000$ for a months supply and I'm feeling no results from it (of course they say you have to stay on it for 6 months before you notice any differnce which adds up to only 6000$
. It's no wonder I'm getting hounded by organisations trying to "help" me.. making sure I'm taking my meds. I wonder what percentage they get?


I told them that Vitamin D really helped (studies have proven it) but they didn't seem interested and keep saying that can be part of a multi angled approach. I ask questions like "how do I know if it's the Vitamin D or the drug?" and they can't answer me but say I should take both anyway. I'm trialing this one for now but it has very low side effects.. (aside from the stress of a needle) and it is not derived from hamster ovaries.


[edit on 23-11-2009 by riley]



posted on Nov, 23 2009 @ 10:14 AM
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Originally posted by kosmicjack
reply to post by riley
 


Me too! And it all makes sense now doesn't it!?

When you try to make that correlation to a doctor they just give you that look of disdain and take a completely dismissive attitude as if we couldn't possibly know what's up with our own bodies.

The 1st neurologist I tried (an arrogent pig) I mentioned the spinal thing to and ended up having a huge argument with him. He said "I have patients mentioning they've got lipping all the time" and I said "Well maybe thats because it's giving them MS". He didn't like that. Ironically the patient I was talking to in the waiting room had MS symtoms begin coincidentally a year after a diving accident.

The neurologist I have now is okay.. I mentioned the nec problems and while she did not agree with me whole hearedly and say "of course" .. she did refer me to a physio to "get your neck fixed anyway" like she was covering all her bases. My neck made a large cracking sound while I was in there which helped lol. While she might still be following the book she is also having an open mind (so far anyway). She doesn't pretend to know what causes MS so doesn't rule things out that might help. If you get a doctor who thinks they already know it all they won't be able to learn anything so can be dangerous.

btw. I hope you've found a decent doctor now.

[edit on 23-11-2009 by riley]



posted on Nov, 23 2009 @ 10:17 AM
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reply to post by riley
 


Or goat serum.


This is exactly why I ran screaming from doctors. It just became very clear to me from the onset that - since diagnosing it was such hocus-pocus and the cause was such a mystery - they could not possibly treat it safely or effectively by my standards. Fortunately I haven't needed the doctor as mine is a (mercifully) mild form of relapsing/remitting MS.

I suppose I have mostly rejected the diagnosis and I work hard at ignoring it. Most of the people who know me don't even know I have it. I just don't want that mantle around my neck or my psyche. I also don't want it on my insurance history but I guess that's an entirely different thread.

[edit on 23/11/2009 by kosmicjack]



posted on Nov, 23 2009 @ 10:23 AM
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If its as simple as a blockage why was this not found out sooner? It should have been discovered during an autopsy, or perhaps people just didn't put 2+2 together?



posted on Nov, 23 2009 @ 10:38 AM
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It's a good question. I also wonder what percentage of people with MS suffer from stokes as the final cause of death?



posted on Nov, 23 2009 @ 10:42 AM
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Originally posted by mclarenmp4
Thanks for posting this.

My friends mum suffers from MS very badly and she is unable to move unaided and has been for some time now.
It has brought a lot of heartache and problems for the family as she was in the prime of her life and had just given birth to my friends younger sister.

Any bit of hope is a good thing for them so thanks again for this and of course thanks for the dedication of the doctor in making this breakthrough.

Good luck for the future, hopefully this treatment will make it through clinical trials and isn't red taped for too long if successful.


If this is the mechanism of MS, then a much easier way to deal with it, is available. Chelation. One of the effects of chelating, is that arterial plaques are removed gently and gradually. I have been self-chelating for a couple years now, and it is perfectly safe. It is also very effective. I almost hesitate to tell how I know for sure it works, but I will. I originally took it because I was concerned about various metals and other minerals that the body sequesters, that do long term harm, such as Alzheimer's, which seems to run in my family a bit.

At any rate, I'm in my fifties. I started it about three years ago, with one several month long course, and an occasional touch-up course now. My evidence that it clears out plaque? My morning wood came back. I was able to toss out the Viagra, because I don't need it any more.

At any rate, do your own research. The cheapest way is to take EDTA orally, on an empty stomach. Go slow at first. And you can increase dose gradually, as you clear out the first nasty junk. It will give you the runs at first, as it contacts the colon first. And you have to take the minerals you want in your body as supplements to replace those. EDTA just grabs whatever it comes to first, and will also grab the stuff you need. Don't take the minerals closer than four hours to when you take the EDTA though. Otherwise, you are simply setting them against each other and might as well not bother.

If you aren't comfortable with self-chelation, there are now plenty of doctors who do it, though I haven't heard of any who are doing it for MS yet. That will cost a few thousand dollars, and be administered intravenously over a few months. They will also monitor you and do blood work, to make sure you stay balanced. A few grand shouldn't be all that expensive when we are talking about something as serious as MS though. Try a search in google for "doctors who chelate". That ought to bring up some lists so you can find one in your area.

be well!



posted on Nov, 23 2009 @ 10:44 AM
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Originally posted by kosmicjack
reply to post by riley
 


Or goat serum.


This is exactly why I ran screaming from doctors. It just became very clear to me from the onset that - since diagnosing it was such hocus-pocus and the cause was such a mystery - they could not possibly treat it safely or effectively by my standards.

Goat Serum..?

I looked at the side effects of the other meds and for me to take them could be dangerous. The one I'm on has very few side effects and I haven't seen any mention of hampster ovaries or goats piss yet so fingers crossed it actually works.

I told the doctor there is no way I'm taking something that represses/weakens my immune system.. I might need it for a rainy day.

Yes the diagnosing was very frustrating.. I have lots of pretty pictures of my brain now though.



posted on Nov, 23 2009 @ 10:49 AM
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Wow! This could be huge. I was diagnosed in 2000. I am wondering, if it is a problem with a vessel why do many have recurring / relapsing episodes? If it is a vessel wouldn't it be constant? Just asking. Stress triggers my symptoms so I quit self-injecting and am treating it with scotch. I totally agree that drug companies will quash this important finding, leaving those with this insidious disease hanging and spending great sums of money.



posted on Nov, 23 2009 @ 11:19 AM
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Originally posted by kosmicjack
I have never been positively impacted by a medical breakthrough - until now.


There is a doctor at UC Irvine who discovered a cure/treatment for MS. A woman was stung by a scorpion and her MS symptoms went away for two months. The doctor found that sea anemone venom ,which is ten? times stronger eliminates the symptoms in lab rats? with MS.
The bad news is the venom was synthesized some years ago and the drug companies cannot patent it for themselves so they have ZERO interest in it.
This doctor was on TV a few years ago begging for money to do the trials.



posted on Nov, 23 2009 @ 11:26 AM
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MS like all diseases and ailments is a vitamin/mineral deficiency or imbalance. Diseases happen for a reason, they don't just "pop up" like that.

Here is a mainstream article how one MS sufferer "cured" or put his MS in to remission through orthomolecular medicine. Enjoy.

www.montrealgazette.com...



posted on Nov, 23 2009 @ 11:43 AM
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reply to post by kosmicjack
 


it will be very interesting to see how different things might be 5 years from now - won't it?

my mom had MS - also remitting - but that doesn't make it nothing, does it?

in addition to dealing with the disease, one of the worst parts of the whole diagnosis is the diagnosis - as you mentioned

but also - never knowing how far it would go or what turn it might take

I love hearing information like this

thanks kosmic



posted on Nov, 23 2009 @ 11:47 AM
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What an interesting article, thanks for posting!

There was a bit that I found rather disturbing, though:


The U.S. society [National MS Society] goes further, discouraging patients from getting tested or seeking surgical treatment. Rather, it continues to promote drug treatments used to alleviate symptoms, which include corticosteroids, chemotherapy agents and pain medication.


Why would a patient advocacy organization actually discourage patients from even being tested for vascular problems? (rhetorical question: the answer is in the quote)

I hope that this research provides the breakthrough MS sufferers have been waiting for!



posted on Nov, 23 2009 @ 12:48 PM
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Originally posted by IndianaOps
BUMP WOW how wierd that this topic came up I was listening to a medical show working nights on 890 am here is what I learned

1 Treatment of Bone marrow stem cell
1 Treatment of Light Chemo to reset the imunine system
A medicine called Betainfuron
A vitamine called Turmaric (sp?) used widley in India
Contact Dr. Robert Burt at the Fienburg school of medicine at Northwestern in Chicago IL.

they are claiming great strides in riding people of this problem



I was a patient with Dr Burt and would not recommend anything his office or staff does. They were VERY unorganized which was very un-nerving. I won't say anything further as its just my opinion. I was in 1. and 2.



posted on Nov, 23 2009 @ 12:55 PM
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I do want to add I take no M.S. drugs. I have been free of brain and spinal cord lesions for 2 years. I take only 2 things. MMS and a "natural" herb. I tried Marinol but it didn't work and was very expensive.

I have contacted my neuro with this information and will keep all informed



[edit on 23-11-2009 by Bachrk]



posted on Nov, 23 2009 @ 06:11 PM
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NEWS

Sea Anemone Toxin Halts Experimental
Multiple Sclerosis

Findings May Lead to New Treatments for Disease

Irvine, Calif., Nov. 19, 2001 -- Sea anemones use venom to stun their prey, but one component of that venom halts--and may reverse--the paralysis seen in an experimental form of multiple sclerosis, according to a study by UC Irvine's College of Medicine and the University of Marseilles, France.

If the findings conducted on rats prove effective in humans, they could result in a new class of drug treatments for multiple sclerosis, one of the most common diseases of the nervous system, known for its devastating and progressive loss of sensation and function. The study appears in the Nov. 20 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Christine Beeton and Heike Wulff, physiology and biophysics researchers, and their colleagues found that a component of venom called ShK from the Caribbean sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus blocks ion channels located in white blood cells that had been activated to cause an experimental form of multiple sclerosis called EAE. By blocking the channels on these activated cells, ShK prevented the activated cells from attacking the nervous system and causing paralysis.

The white blood cells, also known as T cells, that were activated to cause experimental MS, contained unusually high numbers of a particular ion channel. Usually, such inappropriately activated cells are destroyed by the body's thymus gland, which regulates production of immune cells. But in many cases of multiple sclerosis, these disease-causing cells slip through and can attack nerve cells. Ion channels are found on the surface of cells and play crucial roles in communicating between cells and regulating cellular behavior.

"This experimental form of multiple sclerosis is caused by T cells with high numbers of unique ion channels that may trigger the T cells into attacking neurons and eventually cause paralysis and death," said Beeton. "Our experiments show that we can block these channels, and only these channels, and protect neurons from damage. If these findings hold after testing in other animals and people, they may result in an effective treatment for MS."

Multiple sclerosis is a debilitating disease in which T cells and other components of the immune system literally attack their own nervous system, resulting in tremors, burning, sensory deprivation, paralysis and eventually death. Immune cells cause the disease by stripping away a protective sheath called myelin that normally surrounds neurons and helps them transmit crucial nerve signals.

The disease can strike the young and elderly and can take years to develop. The National Multiple Sclerosis Society estimates that between 250,000 and 350,000 people in the United States suffer from multiple sclerosis. There is no known cure, though certain treatments can address symptoms and even slow the disease's course if detected early.

ShK blocked the ion channels and stopped the activated cells' destructive activity. By continuously blocking these T cell channels with ShK, the researchers found they could reverse the experimental disease, even after the initial onset of symptoms. In some rats that were showing signs of paralysis, their function was nearly fully restored.

ShK is the most potent inhibitor known for these channels on the activated T cells, but its short life span in the bloodstream reduces its effectiveness as a therapeutic drug.

"ShK may not last long enough to prevent or treat disease on a long-term basis," Wulff said. "But it appears to match the biochemical structure of the channel well enough to block it and change the T cells' responses. Our group is searching for chemically similar substances that last longer in the body."

"This research shows that we may be able to effectively treat the disease while preserving the immune system by targeting a specific cellular ion channel," Beeton said. "Still, researchers will have to find





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