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Archery Question

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posted on Oct, 26 2009 @ 05:11 PM
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I'm thinking of buying a bow for archery training and hunting. What is the best or most popular bow for women, or does it matter? The reason I ask is because I don't have a lot of upper body strength. I've been told that I may need to work out and build muscle in my arms which I'm prepared to do. Thanks for your help.




posted on Oct, 26 2009 @ 05:26 PM
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reply to post by gazerstar
 


You Might want to look at something like thisCompound bow youth/women
Draw Weights - 20-30, 30-40, and 40-50 lb.
It is a bit pricey but you shouldn't have trouble with draw weight or length

Oh and it doesnt have to be this one... just something like it, try a few out and see what feels good to you... that's the biggie

[edit on 26-10-2009 by DaddyBare]



posted on Oct, 26 2009 @ 05:39 PM
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Go to your local sports shop. You need to figure out your draw weight and distance. The only really reliable way is to go and let the pros help you. Also take lessons or go shoot with a friend who has experience. It is very important to learn how to draw properly and what muscles to use etc.



posted on Oct, 26 2009 @ 05:45 PM
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Diamond is hard to beat! $200.00 ready to shoot

22-28 " draw adjustment and 30-60# draw 65-70% let off
That is by far the most adjustable and adaptable to fit to anyone.

If you get the 31" max draw, "it goes as low as 26" I believe... like my wife has you'll find that your mate will shoot it more than his own, I do!

I'm not a salesman, and Red Head "bass pro" offers a generic version that is just as good!

www.diamond-bows.com...

[edit on 26-10-2009 by Doc Holiday]



posted on Oct, 26 2009 @ 06:36 PM
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No offense to compound bow users but a standard recurve bows of about 30-40 lbs of draw is where most archers should start. Compound bow require professional tuners to shoot properly but recurves are simple as a stone. IMHO only after you can consistently hit deer and pig in the vitals at 25-30 yards with a recurve should you move upto the compound bows.

I actually shoot my wrist slingshot(catapult for the blokes) way more than my bow as it's much more practical for small game than bows. I carry a folding one and a small bag of 000 buckshot when bow hunting for deer and pig. Shooting wrist rocket slingshots at small game is very similar to bow hunting for larger game.

The third quiet option of course is the crossbow which is far more gun like. Not quite as hand as bow but certainly as accurate and deadly with much less practice required to reliably take big game at distances beyond 35 yards as compared to bows.



posted on Oct, 26 2009 @ 06:46 PM
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You might want to look at crossbows as well - they can be easier to draw because you can use both hands. They are more accurate for a beginner.
You can also probably find one with a crank or lever for loading.

My friend had a beautiful old antique crossbow with a crank - it had a 300lb draw and you would NOT want to be shot by that. It took a bit of time loading, but was pretty easy - it did weigh a ton though.

But with a crossbow, once loaded, you can relax


For myself - I haven't had a bow for a while, but I had a short fiber glass compound bow with an adjustable draw for a long time (can't remember the draw weight, 60/100 I think - thats very heavy though, even for me and I am a very big guy).

You have to check draw strength for yourself. Get something comfortable for you - don't get too much draw power, it reduces your accuracy - and you'll get sore arms from target shooting.

When I was younger I used a wooden recurve bow - it wasn't really powerful enough for hunting anything big, but it was light and easy to carry, and to string.

EDIT: I would agree with the above poster - a nice recurve is the best place to start. In fact, I would say a compound bow is generally fairly hard to justify - it has some great advantages, but if your hunting and have to do some hiking along with it - then having something simple and light to carry is a pretty big advantage. Might not have the kill power - but if you lack physical strength - then just adjust your game to your bows power.

Also - I like the comment on the slingshot - great hunting weapon - silent, and plenty of kill power for a low draw strength. I use to shoot birds at 40-50 yards with a slingshot - I found it far more accurate than a bow. Also - if you miss with a slingshot - you often find the game doesn't even move - so you can keep shooting till you hit.

[edit on 26-10-2009 by Amagnon]



posted on Oct, 26 2009 @ 11:37 PM
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Thank you all for your advice.
I'll research all that information and plan a trip to an outdoor store soon. In a true apocalyptic, no-commerce, SHTF situation, if I had to make to make due with what I could find naturally to make my own arrows, replace the string, repair the bow, etc. how would I go about it and which type of bow would be best for that type of situation? Sorry for all the questions.



posted on Oct, 26 2009 @ 11:50 PM
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Originally posted by crgintx
No offense to compound bow users but a standard recurve bows of about 30-40 lbs of draw is where most archers should start. Compound bow require professional tuners to shoot properly but recurves are simple as a stone. IMHO only after you can consistently hit deer and pig in the vitals at 25-30 yards with a recurve should you move upto the compound bows.

I actually shoot my wrist slingshot(catapult for the blokes) way more than my bow as it's much more practical for small game than bows. I carry a folding one and a small bag of 000 buckshot when bow hunting for deer and pig. Shooting wrist rocket slingshots at small game is very similar to bow hunting for larger game.

The third quiet option of course is the crossbow which is far more gun like. Not quite as hand as bow but certainly as accurate and deadly with much less practice required to reliably take big game at distances beyond 35 yards as compared to bows.


Listen to this poster gazerstar. A standard recurve although I would seriously consider a take down model. Matthews has a nice one with an aluminum riser that will stand up to a lot, and is not expensive.

If you got an extra set of limbs and a couple of extra strings you would be all set for a shtf situation.

A takedown is also much easier to pack as it comes apart in three pieces, the handle (riser) and the two limbs. If you have a sturdy riser, the only thing that I could see breaking would be the limbs, so it's good to have an extra set. You can also get the two sets of limbs in different strengths, one for learning and a stronger pair for hunting.

With a recurve bow, there is not as much fitting to the individual as there os in a compound bow as the draw length on a compound is fussy and has to be set for the individual. A recurve does not have that limitation, and not nearly as much to go wrong with it.

I do know a lot about archery and have been the provincial champion in the past. Don't let anyone sell you something that looks like it has too many parts if you are looking for a survival bow. The more it has, the more can go wrong with it.

I would suggest no more than a 30 pound pull on the one set of limbs, and since you are not so strong, a draw weight of 45 pounds for the second set.

I have a couple of recurves in the 60 pound range, and I wouldn't recommend them even for a man unless he has built up the muscles needed.



posted on Oct, 27 2009 @ 01:38 AM
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For a shtf senario I personally wouldn't want to lug around those heavy type bows all day long, I would personally just use the slingshot with slingbow attachment for arrows if necessary.

www.youtube.com...







[edit on 27-10-2009 by redgy]



posted on Oct, 27 2009 @ 11:11 AM
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reply to post by gazerstar
 


I would go for a recurve bow,as theres a lot less parts to go wrong than a compound bow.
Recurves are cheaper,and possibly more durable too.

Heres my recurve:

www.hunarchery.com...

Its 75# draw,and really packs a punch.Make sure you find your own draw weight from a pro/shop though.
I would also reccomend you look at making your own arrows,as this cuts down on costs.
Buy a fletching jig and some shafts and tips,then you can make/repair your own arrows.
This helped me with concentration,as you don't want to lose an arrow you have spent time making yourself!!(so I aim more carefully)
If you do decide to make your own arrows,make sure to choose shafts with a "spine" strength to correspond to your bows draw weight.
Finally,you may want to invest in a good forearm protector,as some people get pretty bad welts from the string hitting the inside of the forearm(you will know if you fall into this catergory after your first 20 or so shots.

Use as many different types of bow as you can before you buy,to get a good feel for what is comfortable for you.

Heres where I get my arrow components from,BTW:

www.english-longbow.co.uk...

Have fun,and be safe.



posted on Oct, 27 2009 @ 08:01 PM
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reply to post by redgy
 


Very nice. As an old traditional shooter that looks like quite of bit of fun. And that is a good enough excuse to make one. Quite an improvement on the sling-crossbow pistol I made as a kid.

It was the wooden stock of a flintlock style cap gun with all the metal hardware removed and the prod was just a piece of a sycamore branch nailed on the stock. A really good rubber band stapled to the limbs with a leather swatch for the pouch. It would fire a de-fuzzed cattail reed pretty far and at close ranged did serious damage to a sheet of cardboard. It might have taken a squirrel or bird, but I never tried.



posted on Oct, 28 2009 @ 02:35 AM
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Listen to the posters who recommend a recurve! A compound bow lets off so you dont have to hold the full draw weight while you aim. While this is a great design given ideal conditions, it is prone to failure, as many have pointed out, and you will not develop proper form or muscle memory.

Be sure not to go with too much bow! I am a 6' male with a 260 lb muscular build and I am shooting a 40# bow right now! I can draw and shoot a much heavier bow, however I will move up only when I can draw and accurately fire 50 arrows in a row without feeling it in my muscles. I will have perfect form, accuracy, and muscle tone by not going too large. At useful distance a 40# bow can bring down any large game you are likely to encounter, including elk and black bear.



posted on Oct, 28 2009 @ 02:40 AM
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Originally posted by redgy
For a shtf senario I personally wouldn't want to lug around those heavy type bows all day long, I would personally just use the slingshot with slingbow attachment for arrows if necessary.

www.youtube.com...



Good idea! I have a bowstring in my survival kit but a sling would be great until I made the bow and arrows. Could a sling be as powerful and long-distance as a make-shift bow?


[edit on 28-10-2009 by notreallyalive]



posted on Oct, 28 2009 @ 11:40 AM
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This was pretty reasonable accuracy with a crossbow.

www.youtube.com...



posted on Oct, 28 2009 @ 12:02 PM
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I understand that modern bows are heavey and yes they need to be "tuned" but as long as you have access to modern equip. use it and learn what "tuning" really is because evan if you use a long bow or make a stick bow for survival, you still need to understand "tiller, nock point, arrow spine, basic bow string knots, and much much more.
Yes I agree big lumbersome compounds would be no good in survival, but the guy/gal that has that knowledge of tuning and proper use of technoloy, will definately have the upper hand with a long/recurve bow.
By learning anchor points and repeteablity, and what a person with a stick bow can really do with a good anchor and basic sights "aiming referances"
No you don't need mechanical sights to aim, you can use scratch or pencil marks on the back of your riser "above the hand position" for distance, and string center line for right and left.

I do like traditional bows and own a few, and in most cases can shoot my stick bow better than the general population , can shoot compounds.

Stay far away from cross bows, they have a really bad mechanical advantage, are extremely noisey, and are by far not near as accurate as any real bow, and not as fast as modern bows... but all the ppl that fall for the "cool looking" stuff still like them, and they are the same ppl that fall for the gun tech crap too. They have big $$ pistols tech 9's, glocks, and the likes, not that they won't work but, ammo and usability will overcome them in the end.
Knowledge and pratical user friendly items that don't require "special" equipment will become the best and only thing left real quik if a true SHTF happens..



posted on Oct, 28 2009 @ 12:14 PM
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Conratulations on seeking a bow to sharpen your skill! A very overlooked weapon indeed.

I'll never forget when I got mine how out of shape my bodsy felt after a few hours of shooting. MAN! It'll wear ya out if you don't do it alot!



posted on Nov, 14 2009 @ 11:05 PM
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Well it sure is nice to see all the archers step up.
I really can't add too much to the advise you have received already.
When I took an interest in the bow,I sought out an Archery club.
Everyone,as in this thread,was extremely helpful.
So I guess that would be my next step before i buy equipment.

As others have suggested,A good quality slingshot compliments a bow.


[edit on 14-11-2009 by The Utopian Penguin]



posted on Nov, 15 2009 @ 03:11 AM
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Originally posted by The Utopian Penguin

When I took an interest in the bow,I sought out an Archery club.
Everyone,as in this thread,was extremely helpful.
So I guess that would be my next step before i buy equipment.

[edit on 14-11-2009 by The Utopian Penguin]


Best advise yet... Join an Archery club. They can offer you training on how to use a bow as well as what bow to purchase


Plus... they normally have bows that you can use for the first few weeks so, if you decided it’s not for you, you haven’t wasted any money on an expensive bow.



posted on Nov, 15 2009 @ 05:03 AM
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What is best is really a personal thing. Find something that you are comfortable with.

In agreement with the rest of the posts, I also recommend a recurve bow. I have 2 compound bows that I hardly ever shoot. I have an old Ben Pearson wood/fiberglass laminated recurve that is pretty much all that I use. I am more accurate with that than with my compounds.

About making arrows, I personally would NEVER use a wooden arrow in a compound bow. I use nothing but aluminum with a compound. I have even seen one of those high dollar carbon fiber arrows splinter on someone at a competition.

A mention was made of a wrist guard, and I highly recommend getting one. They are cheap, and you may find that you may not need or like it (I personally don't use one). If so, then you are out much money. But for a beginner it is a must.

The OP mentioned archery for a female. My girlfriend has an ample bosom, and she has to wear a sports bra with some padding stuffed in there. Oh yeah, don't forget to clip those long finger nails and tie that long hair back.



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