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Tiny 'nuclear batteries' unveiled

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posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 09:26 AM
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reply to post by C0bzz
 


I mentioned the hurdle, because experience has learned that íf there is more power on tap, we tend to invent stuff that gobbles up even more power, for a more powerful result. Killacycle already does the quarter mile in 7sec or less...how much HP could be applied when batteries were more powerful? They would go just as far, but with much better performance.

An electric motor's power is only limited by the thickness of the windings and the durability of the ball-bearings and how quick it can dissipate heat. In model-car racing they already use 100.000rp/m brushless motors putting out 1 hp @ 7,4v from a motor the size of an old fashioned 35mil. film-container(?? not sure how it's called in english) making those "toy-cars" go around the track at 100mph (World record is even higher..160mph @ 11v! craaaazy)

Prize of that all is amperages in the 150 to 200 -range @ 7,4 volts

A far-out example: say the batteries have 500x the power of conventional batteries, they could, barring size, be used in electric military airplanes that, because of their "power above all" adagium, use far more fuel/power than conventional airplanes do..hence, they would still drain super batteries in no-time short due to their power hunger.

That's what I meant.

For conventional means, like cars, yes, indeed, we could see cars that come with a 150000(being conservative here..I do not believe the "million times more power"-claim) mile-guarantee straight from GM or FORD or something.




posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 09:37 AM
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thanks COBZ thats an interesting read

why are people questioning thier ` rechargability ` ???

that is not an issuie woith a " nuclear " battery of this type

these batteries start to " degrade " the second they are manufactured - and thier life span is determined by the half life and mass of the isotope used

storing them on a shelf for 5 years will " degrade " thier output just as much as running them at maximum permitted load for the same 5 years - there is no difference - the radio isotope still decays at the rate set by its half life - not the electrical load on the battery



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 06:56 PM
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Batteries at the moment are required to be disposed of correctly, cant just throw em in the ordinary trash. and they are harmful if leak ...

with the amount concerned i dont think its too different at least in principal. radiation leaks may make me change my mind though..



posted on Oct, 10 2009 @ 11:29 AM
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reply to post by Quantum_Squirrel
 


Ok im gonna say this once.... RADIOACTIVE



posted on Oct, 10 2009 @ 12:43 PM
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Originally posted by kick Flip
reply to post by Quantum_Squirrel
 


Ok im gonna say this once.... RADIOACTIVE


... As is your smoke detector. and many luminous watches.

It depends on HOW radioactive it is.



posted on Oct, 10 2009 @ 08:15 PM
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So are bananas and brazil nuts and pretty much anything with potassium. Most everything that runs on electricity is shootin some form of radiation at ya, mostly gamma. Neon lights will get ya, tv's, laptops all that good stuff. One of my professors told me that a study was conducted to assess the potential damage of the radiation emitted by all the cell phones/towers, and it was concluded that up to 2 billion people will develop brain cancer by the year 2012, so i'd be much more worried about that than any amount of nuclear batteries.



posted on Oct, 11 2009 @ 04:59 PM
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SHORTLY before Lynn Sugarman of Teaneck, N.J., bought her summer home in Lake George, N.Y., two years ago, a routine inspection revealed it had elevated levels of radon, a radioactive gas that can cause lung cancer. So she called a radon measurement and mitigation technician to find the source.

DETECTION Using devices like the Geiger counter and the radiation detection instrument Stanley Liebert measures the radiation and radon emanating from granite like that in Lynn Sugarman’s kitchen counters.

“He went from room to room,” said Dr. Sugarman, a pediatrician. But he stopped in his tracks in the kitchen, which had richly grained cream, brown and burgundy granite countertops. His Geiger counter indicated that the granite was emitting radiation at levels 10 times higher than those he had measured elsewhere in the house.



www.nytimes.com...



The minerals that are found in granite are primarily quartz, plagioclase feldspars, potassium or K-feldspars, hornblende and micas. Quartz is usually the last mineral to crystallize and fills in the extra space of the other minerals. Quartz's hardness, lack of chemical reactivity and near lack of cleavage give granite a significant amount of its desirable durable properties. The quartz will appear gray, but is actually colorless and is reflecting and fusing the colors of the white and black minerals surrounding it. The plagioclase feldspars are generally white with a porcelaneous luster. The K-feldspars are generally the ones that give granite its color variations from yellow to orange to pink or blue. Dark K-feldspars can give granite its black varieties as well. The micas are generally muscovite (silver), biotite (black or brown) or lepidollite (violet or pink) and provide the sparkle that some granites possess. The hornblende and biotite provide granite with the black pepper portion of the famous and distinctive "salt and pepper" look to classic granite.

Some accessory minerals include gemstones such as tourmaline, beryl, topaz, zircons and apatite. These minerals are generally scattered in the groundmass and generally do not affect the overall appearance of the stone. Other accessory minerals are important economically such as phosphates and rare earth oxides. Related to the rare earth elements is a significant concentration in granite of the element uranium. Granite is actually rather radioactive and has 5 to 20 times the concentration of uranium compared to other common rock types. Some health concern exists in areas that are rich in granitic terrain, as background radiation is enhanced by the presence of large granite bodies. Although the uranium is generally not concentrated enough to make granite a uranium ore, the leaching and erosion of granite has helped produce most of the uranium ore deposits around the world.


www.galleries.com...



posted on Oct, 11 2009 @ 05:13 PM
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wouldn't a nuclear batterie have some sort of security threat?



posted on Oct, 11 2009 @ 08:02 PM
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Oh... I don't know about that. You would have to accumulate enough batteries and take them apart to get the radioactive sulfur (the stuff in the prototype) to use in a dirty bomb. And that would have to be enough to scare the bejeevous out of people by making the radiation level higher than that you can find from a Granite counter top.

With the administrative hoops that you have to jump through just to buy real sudafed, I'm sure that they could keep tabs on how many batteries that you have.

Theoretically possible... but very cumbersome. You might be better served by trying to extract it from smoke detectors or grinding up the granite yourself. Either way, you will probably die of an STD before you become a threat.



posted on Oct, 11 2009 @ 09:40 PM
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They have been using "radioactive" materials in many things for years. If there was any danger we would know it by now. Even gun sights use tritium. Why are people freaking out over this?



posted on Oct, 11 2009 @ 10:41 PM
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As long as it can improve on my iPod battery I'm all for this new tech



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