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New approach to hydrogen fuel production

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posted on Sep, 21 2009 @ 12:46 PM
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Guess what? It might just happen in your lifetime...maybe soon.

Scientists have developed a rapid production of hydrogen by using aluminum. The waste product appears to be recyclable. A rare element, gallium, assists in the process. While gallium is rather expensive, it is not a big part of the process. The cost is really in the price of aluminum. Could this be an underlying reason for the search for bauxite causing the destruction of rain forest?

Purdue University is leading the way in developing this new technology. It is already licensed to one manufacturer. Get your hopes up on this one. The Earth has a lot of aluminum, and it's common in the mantle of the Earth because it is a light metal.

For more exciting information, see it on YouTube here www.youtube.com... or go to the news here www.physorg.com...

Looks good to me. What do you think? Fill up your tank with water.




posted on Sep, 21 2009 @ 12:55 PM
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I thought the Japanese already had some device like this. Anything that's this promising has likely already been done and than shelved. If it is made available, they'll likely make it too expensive for most.

Dream and wish you want, if it makes you happy.



posted on Sep, 21 2009 @ 01:15 PM
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It appears that the Dept of Energy is the problem. forums.anandtech.com... The invention is noteworthy, provided the aluminum is recycled via economic processes. Apparently it is cost effective enough to be a viable possibility. It is in the range of $3 per gallon gasoline, and is non-polluting.

[edit on 21-9-2009 by Jim Scott]



posted on Sep, 21 2009 @ 01:45 PM
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Your right that bauxite is pretty common, but aluminum exists as an Oxide, not in Natural state.

Aluminum is a manufactured product using Bauxite to create Alumina, which is then used to create Aluminum. Aluminum Oxide is very hard and used in synthetic gems and for cutting tools, etc.



posted on Sep, 21 2009 @ 03:06 PM
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It doesnt make sense, because of the tremendous energy required to make metallic aluminum.

Why not just electrolyze the h2o directly, with nuclear, solar or hydo power, instead of the spending the excess energy to mine the bauxite transport it, then refine it and alloy it with an increadibally expensive metal.
The gaseous h2 can be transported just like any other gas or stored in a metalic hydrate to be released on need.
Although the chemistry behind it is very interesting its not very practical in the long run.

Its a very Rube Goldbergian idea.



posted on Sep, 21 2009 @ 03:13 PM
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reply to post by Indigenous equity
 


Bauxite is aluminum oxide,
what sense does it make to mine the alumina, use all that energy to transform it into metalic aluminum, and the turn it back to alumina.



posted on Sep, 21 2009 @ 03:22 PM
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Don't you see. This technology still makes us all dependent on some large energy corporation. That is the beauty in it! Screw solar.

[edit on 21-9-2009 by Longtimegone]



posted on Sep, 21 2009 @ 09:27 PM
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There's a lot of aluminum around. Check your recycling centers for a start. It must be cost effective to produce, and from the video it appears to produce a lot of hydrogen.



posted on Sep, 21 2009 @ 10:09 PM
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reply to post by Jim Scott
 


A true electret could produce hydrogen indefinately, but that is suppressed also.

You ain't gonna see any of this until you find a workaround the PTBs.



posted on Sep, 22 2009 @ 04:10 AM
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"Bauxite is aluminum oxide,
what sense does it make to mine the alumina, use all that energy to transform it into metalic aluminum, and the turn it back to alumina"


Bauxite ore is converted into alumina, then the alumina is converted into aluminum.



posted on Sep, 22 2009 @ 05:33 AM
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reply to post by Jim Scott
 


Very intestesting method of hydrogen production. I wonder how much energy goes into making the fuel in the first place?

My post here details a better use for that metal: www.abovetopsecret.com...



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