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NPR hit piece on 9/11 Truth and Charlie Sheen interview

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posted on Sep, 13 2009 @ 11:57 AM
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NPR hit piece on 9/11 Truth and Charlie Sheen interview


www.onthemedia.org

For 9/11 conspiracy theorists, the anniversary of the attacks functions as a PR peg for spreading their version of what happened that day. WNYC's Beth Fertig is taking special note this year, after discovering that her reporting from September 11, 2001 is being used as evidence on conspiracy theorist websites and literature.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Sep, 13 2009 @ 11:57 AM
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NPR's "on the media" did a hit piece on 9/11 truth and Charlie Sheen's interview. They interviewed this reporter I think named Beth, about how she described the building collapse as if it was a controlled demolition. She then stressed that this was just a "metaphor" and that she doesn't like truthers taking her out of context. The host then went on to believe that her eye-witness "metaphor" was THE ONLY EVIDENCE of the bombs in building theory. They set up this straw man to knock it down, and then accuse the conspiracy theorists of taking things out of context.

Why didn't NPR, supposedly "all things considered" talk about the nano thermite in the dust?

As another commenter said, Lame hitpiece. They play Charlie Sheen inviting them to look at ALL the facts, and then they only look at one tiny fact and take it out of context. This proves that NPR is really not "all things considered" and is simply pseudo-intellectual sponsorship propaganda.

www.onthemedia.org
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Sep, 13 2009 @ 12:15 PM
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NPR is part of the establishment. They will never scrutinize the other side of 9-11 truth... people need to look at both sides of the story. It looks like NPR doesn't want to do that. I don't think people should be surprised over this.



 
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