It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Ideas For Make-shift Rafts?

page: 1
2
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Sep, 8 2009 @ 08:41 PM
link   
(I already posted this but I am new here and it wasn't showing up, so I thought I'd just post it again)


When SHTF it's likely that we will have to flee from our current residence and cross numerous rivers and streams.

Has anyone given any thought of how to make a make-shift raft out of the surroundings? Because I was thinking about using tires which would most likely be very plentiful since many cars would be left abandon, and at every new river you would have to make a new raft since you couldn't just lug one around. Also you'd be more likely to find tires nearby than a certain tree or branch that floats, and you'd waste much time trying them out, and I don't think that if your fleeing you'd want to be wasting time

I'm thinking that tires kept together with rope and boards would work well.

What I'm wondering though is if anyone has tried this? And do you know if they can hold a lot of weight for sure?
And how well they float? And if they tip over easily?

Also if you have any other ideas for rafts that could be quickly made up could you let me know? Or any tips for the tire rafts? Thanks.




posted on Sep, 8 2009 @ 08:44 PM
link   
Didnt you just post a new thread saying this exact same thing not so long ago?.....



posted on Sep, 8 2009 @ 08:45 PM
link   
reply to post by legacyv
 


Yes but my computer was messing up so it posted it twice



posted on Sep, 8 2009 @ 08:45 PM
link   
reply to post by legacyv
 


Yes but my computer was messing up so it posted it twice



posted on Sep, 8 2009 @ 08:48 PM
link   

Originally posted by excitedwaterkickingritual
reply to post by legacyv
 


Yes but my computer was messing up so it posted it twice



posted it twice with diffrent titles?



posted on Sep, 8 2009 @ 09:00 PM
link   
I dunno about tires man. If I were you I'd think more along the lines of 40 gallon drums, maybe styrofoam. But if you want a raft so bad why noty just buy a rubber/plastic inflatable. They are light, cheap and easily assembled. Heck, I'm sure they'll even be on sale in the upcoming months.



posted on Sep, 8 2009 @ 09:20 PM
link   
reply to post by red_leader
 



Yes In the beginning I was thinking about Styrofoam but I'm not sure it would just be lying around in large quantities XD And Yes I think I might just end up buying a raft so we'd definitely have one at each crossing and it would be easier to carry ;P



posted on Sep, 8 2009 @ 09:28 PM
link   
Tires do not provide much buoyancy, if any. Inner tubes work fine though.

[edit on 9/8/2009 by Phage]



posted on Sep, 8 2009 @ 09:42 PM
link   
Buy an airmattress and a small pump for it. They don't weigh much. You could use the mattress as a raft and sleep on it at night if you had to. Or as one poster mentioned inflatable small rafts don't cost much and are light.

Don't forget to carry rope. Rope can always be useful.

And keep a backpack with all your survival stuff ready to go, you will be fine.

[edit on 8-9-2009 by elaine]



posted on Sep, 8 2009 @ 09:47 PM
link   
reply to post by elaine
 


Yes, thanks. I was of course already bringing a survival bag and plenty of rope, I was just at a loss for a raft if needed XD
But I think I am just going to buy a raft and possibly an air mattress, I'm not sure. But that's a great idea, use as a raft then sleep on it at night
I never even thought of that.



posted on Sep, 8 2009 @ 11:35 PM
link   
An air mattress is easily punctured.. cause what if you had muddy boots on, and somehow something sharp ended up stuck in between your boot tread, just barely long enough to puncture a small hole through the plastic..

A couple wooden pallets and two or three 2x4's to merge them together with screws/long nails.. two pallets is probably more stable than one. put the air mattress underneath the pallets, secure several liter-a-cola bottles around the perimeter possibly, get fancy, this raft has got to be cool.

Don't forget a lighting rod in case it rains hard, hold it bare handed.

[edit on 8-9-2009 by thaknobodi]



posted on Sep, 9 2009 @ 12:52 AM
link   
You can always hollow out a log by burning the insides and make a canoe



posted on Sep, 9 2009 @ 12:59 AM
link   
Dead. bloated bodies. Saw them being used for that purpose in an episode of Rome.



posted on Sep, 9 2009 @ 01:45 AM
link   
Wouldn't you just use the bridges like everyone else fleeing the SHTF?

You should really invest in a boat load(pun intended) of those skinny long balloons. You could blow them up and put them in a plastic bag and use that as a flotation device as you flee across the river and streams.

They are also good for storing water in too as that should be a concern of yours while you are fleeing.

Also when you get to where you and all the other "Flee'rs"(I just made that up)get to where ever you are going and are safe from the SHTF'ers(made that up too)you can entertain the others by making balloon animals and hats.

I can't believe somebody is spending their waking hours worrying about something so insignificant as crossing a body of water.

What you never learned to swim?



posted on Sep, 9 2009 @ 02:17 AM
link   
Just a thinker... if you are going to be in enough water that you will require a raft, you must have a way to withstand the wavefront impact. Most anything useful will be destroyed at that point. Sill, tires are not easily punctured. Find a sports car with aluminum rims and use those. Or, just go nuts, look for a boat, as I'm sure they'll be in large supply
.

Anything with buoyancy will float. Especially if your by the coast and have seawater. The salt in the seawater will make it possible for the flotation of higher-density objects. I would recommend using barrels. Even metal ones, if sealed properly, will hold great weights and they are difficult to puncture. Plastic ones would work as well. THe best idea, though, is when the water level rises. Look for what is floating.



posted on Sep, 9 2009 @ 07:22 AM
link   
Trash. Plastic bottles with tops. Styrofoam. trash bags inflated and sealed. Glass jars with tight lids.



posted on Sep, 9 2009 @ 07:27 AM
link   
I just don't see you getting very far or very fast with a tire under each arm... tires sink unless their full of air BTW

Maybe if you bought a small inflatable mattress? something you could put in your pack that also gets you up off the ground when you sleep...

[edit on 9-9-2009 by DaddyBare]



posted on Sep, 9 2009 @ 07:35 AM
link   
I know you're looking for "make-shift" but, at the risk of stating the obvious, how about a canoe/kayak. Depending on terrain portage overland would not be a huge issue and if you invest wisely a bargain can be found.

I've been looking at one for recreational/Bug Out means for a few weeks now. I'm leaning toward an inflatable kayak.

Sevylor make two called the Colorado and the Hudson. I'm leaning toward the latter due to build but both are pretty rugged animals and can carry around 210 Kilos. Price-wise very reasonable, reliable, easy to use (so I've read on canoeing fora) and packs down to a reasonable size and weight (around 20 Kilos I think).

Failing that, learn to swim and pack heavy-duty bin-liners/pallet-covers.

[edit on 9-9-2009 by Nirgal]


CX

posted on Sep, 9 2009 @ 07:59 AM
link   

Originally posted by Nirgal
Sevylor make two called the Colorado and the Hudson. I'm leaning toward the latter due to build but both are pretty rugged animals and can carry around 210 Kilos. Price-wise very reasonable, reliable, easy to use (so I've read on canoeing fora) and packs down to a reasonable size and weight (around 20 Kilos I think).

Failing that, learn to swim and pack heavy-duty bin-liners/pallet-covers.

[edit on 9-9-2009 by Nirgal]


Hi Nirgal.....i was looking at one of those the other day at my local chandlers, theres a Rio which packs down to 12kg, can hold 100kgs but i guess it depends on how much you and your gear weigh.

Great thread anyway, theres a few other methods of river crossing that might be of use in this thread, i'll pop back later to post a few up if no-ones done it already.

CX.
CX.



posted on Sep, 9 2009 @ 08:00 AM
link   
reply to post by excitedwaterkickingritual
 


I've never tried it, but if you had a tarp, rope and some suitable tree branches nearby, you might be able to build a raft suitable for short, calm water crossings. Using the tree branches as a frame for rigidity and volume, a decent-sized tarp might be capable of holding enough air volume to float a person of average weight...as long as the tarp doesn't leak.

Again, I've never tried it, and I'm sure its easier said than done, but theoretically, I can't see why it wouldn't work.



new topics

top topics



 
2
<<   2 >>

log in

join