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Hacking the Brain with the Pentatonic Scale

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posted on Aug, 2 2009 @ 09:45 AM
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Video

Cool video that shows how brain programming works. At the very end he says that no matter where he goes in the world, everyone gets it. He throws curve balls and the audience responds immediately with the correct tone.

Its amazing how we are all wired to pick up on these certain frequencies and only some tones resonate with us. Where does it come from...collective consciousness?

Any Ideas?







posted on Aug, 2 2009 @ 09:55 AM
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Well. I have this little pet theory that we might have sang before we talked, that language is a subset of music. So they speak of us being 'wired' for language, I'd imagine that understanding the 'logic' of music might be a part of that.



posted on Aug, 2 2009 @ 10:00 AM
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reply to post by Jadette
 


Interesting. I guess a baby crying for mothers milk know she has to hit a certain tone to express his need to his mother. Before words we hit notes to express our feelings. Laughing, cooing, crying, all different notes you could say. Well done!



posted on Aug, 2 2009 @ 10:04 AM
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Originally posted by Jadette
Well. I have this little pet theory that we might have sang before we talked, that language is a subset of music. So they speak of us being 'wired' for language, I'd imagine that understanding the 'logic' of music might be a part of that.



And music in turn is just vibrations. All of our reality is made of vibrational frequencies and so this explains that how reading ancient spiritual texts phonetically out loud gives us spiritual power even if we do not understand the words on the page. Thus, approaching this interesting idea BringtheLight has put forward I think that some tones work and others dont because human brains are set to work on a number of defined wavelengths only (that is what makes us humans more than anything else, we are on the wavelength of this physical plane).



posted on Aug, 2 2009 @ 10:22 AM
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reply to post by Majestic23
 


Very true, everything around us is vibrating. Our ears are tuned to pick up a certain range of vibrations.

I saw Funny People the other night and a certain line stood out to me when I read your reply. When Sethe Rogan was talking to his crush, he awkwardly asked her if she liked music. She replied, "Thats like asking me if I like food."

I mean what human doesn't listen to music. Its a necessity. People have their preferences, but I have yet to meet a person who dosent like any type of music. The pentatonic scale is seen throughout all music, but why? Why do certain notes sound good and others dont? And how do people hit those notes in the auditorium like a reflex?

How programmed are we?



posted on Aug, 2 2009 @ 10:36 AM
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Sounds like a very plausable theory, in my opinion i believe it could be true. Only a few days ago i came across this article on BBC news...


Chimpanzees are biologically programmed to appreciate pleasant music. The discovery comes from experiments showing that an infant chimpanzee prefers to listen to consonant music over dissonant music. That suggests the apes are born with an innate appreciation of pleasant sounds, say scientists in the journal Primates. Until now, this was thought to be a universal human trait, but the new finding suggests it evolved in the ancestors of humans and modern apes.


Apes love to rock out!

Seems like we are not the only ones, but the whole animal kingdom also share the love of music. We all know that birds love to sing, some even dance!

Would be interesting to see if any more research comes into this subject, like what makes us enjoy music or sounds??



posted on Aug, 2 2009 @ 10:50 AM
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Originally posted by bringthelight
The pentatonic scale is seen throughout all music, but why? Why do certain notes sound good and others dont? And how do people hit those notes in the auditorium like a reflex?


It seems the pentatonic scale is present because all things have to follow sacred geometry etc...
The only explaination not based in convential psychology I can see is that music literally manipulates anything in its proximity on a sub-molecular level. Thus the sounds that we like to define as nice are ones that make the environment match our mindset.

This explains how certain cultures have instuments like bells and flutes for purifying areas of evil spirits. When structures are organised subtle energy flows through them more easily. So if a Tibetan singing bowl or a choir of angels sounds nice its because it makes the environment light and life force energy moves more freely. If we are in a differant mindset and want the environment to be more dense we will listen to heavy music.

This works for words and other sounds also. We have all seen the study that froze water while playing music and words to it, I have to say it makes sense to me. Lets not forget we are comprised mainly of water especially our brain cavities.



posted on Aug, 2 2009 @ 12:34 PM
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reminds me of the movie "BIG" with tom hanks, i think i am in the wrong job career field....he probably makes 6 times what i do and he is on a stage bounching around....i = JEALOUS :-)



posted on Aug, 2 2009 @ 02:26 PM
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Originally posted by Jadette
Well. I have this little pet theory that we might have sang before we talked, that language is a subset of music. So they speak of us being 'wired' for language, I'd imagine that understanding the 'logic' of music might be a part of that.



We are still singing. Every word you speak loses all of it's purpose if you don't "sing" it in it's proper tone. This is actually part of the programming. If you start using different tones for language you'll sound like a "fool" to people. That's because words only define meaning and their respective tones communicates the emotion behind it. Every senteance you stitch together becomes a short little melody.



To OP : Awesome video, thanks for sharing.



posted on Aug, 2 2009 @ 04:17 PM
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The word universe = one song



posted on Aug, 2 2009 @ 04:23 PM
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reply to post by Trolloks
 


Great find! So I guess the apes like things to be in tune as well. Very interesting stuff. I wonder how much of your reality is altered due to the type of music you listen to. I have always been into upbeat stuff like DMB and classic rock like Zeppelin. Recently I have been listening to more relaxing, classical, and shamanic drumming and I definitely feel more in tune you could say.



posted on Aug, 3 2009 @ 06:00 AM
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reply to post by JustAThought
 


Another great point. The entire meaning and feel of a sentence can be changed by a little note bend upwards at the end. Just tiny little tone adjustments can bring out a totally different feeling in those who hear it.

"I feel great" with the tone going higher at the end of great means you really do feel great, and how great you feel is determined by how much higher the note gets.

"I feel great" with no note change at all sounds like sarcasm.

So yes, we basically are singing our way through life. I am just starting to realize the power of sound now...amazing stuff!



posted on Aug, 7 2009 @ 08:24 AM
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Originally posted by bringthelight
reply to post by JustAThought
 




"I feel great" with the tone going higher at the end of great means you really do feel great, and how great you feel is determined by how much higher the note gets.

"I feel great" with no note change at all sounds like sarcasm.

So yes, we basically are singing our way through life. I am just starting to realize the power of sound now...amazing stuff!


Exactly! Good examples.

Common knowlegde to musicians / songwriters like myself


I find it very interesting though, that it's the pentatonic scale that people respond with. It's the scale you use for blues, but as we see in the demonstration it has way more melodic uses. Yet it is still a melancolic scale. I think there's a connection between the human state of mind and what scale we respond with.

Writing happy songs has always been the hardest part of music. Most songwriters start out with sad songs and find it difficult to master the happyer Ionian/Major scale. But if you see a guy who just won the lottery, whistling on the way to collect his prize you can be sure that he'll be whistling the Ionian/Major scale.

Interesting stuff.

[edit on 7-8-2009 by JustAThought]



posted on Aug, 7 2009 @ 08:44 AM
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I love you.

I love you.

I love you.

Putting the stressor on the individual word in the same sentence implies a new meaning or emphasis for the listener. Interesting!



posted on Aug, 7 2009 @ 05:27 PM
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Originally posted by Hazelnut
I love you.

I love you.

I love you.

Putting the stressor on the individual word in the same sentence implies a new meaning or emphasis for the listener. Interesting!


Perfect example, and it so much reminds me of this short film by a recently diseased legend :


What a coincidence


R.I.P



posted on Aug, 7 2009 @ 05:36 PM
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reply to post by Hazelnut
 


We love you too. Except when you do not cover the litter box.

I love pentatonic scales as well. Good stuff.



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