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H1N1 more pathogenic than seasonal flu; two novel anti-virals being used, per CIDRAP

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posted on Jul, 14 2009 @ 04:00 AM
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www.cidrap.umn.edu...

According to CIDRAP, per a Nature article to be published this week, novel H1N1 is more pathogenic that seasonal strains, praticularly as relates to pulmonary symptoms (and proved in lab animals- mice, ferrets, and macaques).

As well, in addition to Relenza and Tamiflu, there are two novel anti-virals to be used if required:

Antiviral and serology findings

Testing antiviral action against the viruses in mice, the researchers found that the pandemic H1N1 virus was susceptible to licensed neuraminidase inhibitors oseltamivir (Tamiflu) and zanamivir (Relenza), as well as an experimental one called R-125489. An experimental broad-spectrum RNA polymerase inhibitor, called compound T-705, was also effective against the pandemic H1N1 virus


No information is given regarding the manufacturers or the chemical structures of the novel anti-virals- very peculiar. Obviously, resistance to both Tamiflu and Relenza is expected, and anti-virals are to be used to attempt to attenuate the severity of the infections of individuals, with or without vaccines.

The trophism for lower lung involvement with H1N1 indicates we ought to expect high rates of secondary bacterial pneumonia, and many people in hospital, on ventilators. Lower lobular pneumonia is one of the most dangerous forms for healthy people, and even more so for asthmatics and others who have conditions that make them more vulnerable. As well, the article states that the ability of H1N1 to infect the lower lungs is quite similar to H5N1- was this a sneaky attempt to warn of H5N1 spreading around, or the preparation forit's spread? It is absolutely something about which to be concerned. Perhaps TPTB are WELL aware that H1N1 and H5N1 have already reassorted and in the fall we will reap the full fury of that combination....

This reinforces a need to prepare our bodies to the highest level of health- good food, rest, social distancing, exercise, vitamina and herbal supplemets, etc.

I wish wellness to all,

C

[edit on 14-7-2009 by CultureD]




posted on Jul, 14 2009 @ 04:01 AM
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I heard swine flu is 4 times more deadly and contagious than the ordinary flu.



posted on Jul, 14 2009 @ 04:01 AM
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One thought relative to the novel anti-virals- could it be possible that they could be spread via chemtrail spraying? Mosquito abatement spraying? I can imagine a myriad of methods to introduce them into the public- perhaps through GMO food, etc.

Any thoughts or ideas are welcome!



posted on Jul, 14 2009 @ 04:04 AM
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Two neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors, zanamivir (Relenza) and oseltamivir phosphate (Tamiflu), have been licensed for the treatment of and prophylaxis against influenza. In this paper, the new potent NA inhibitor R-125489 is reported for the first time. R-125489 inhibited the NA activities of various type A and B influenza viruses, including subtypes N1 to N9 and oseltamivir-resistant viruses. The survival effect of R-125489 was shown to be similar to that of zanamivir when administered intranasally in a mouse influenza virus A/Puerto Rico/8/34 infection model. Moreover, we found that the esterified form of R-125489 showed improved efficacy compared to R-125489 and zanamivir, depending on the acyl chain length, and that 3-(O)-octanoyl R-125489 (CS-8958) was the best compound in terms of its life-prolonging effect (P < 0.0001, compared to zanamivir) in the same infection model. A prolonged survival effect was observed after a single administration of CS-8958, even if it was given 7 days before infection. It is suggested that intranasally administered CS-8958 works as a long-acting NA inhibitor and shows in vivo efficacy as a result of a single intranasal administration.


Gov Site Source



posted on Jul, 14 2009 @ 04:07 AM
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Thanks for the link, White Wash!



posted on Jul, 14 2009 @ 04:14 AM
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Mechanism of Action of T-705 against Influenza Virus:


T-705, a substituted pyrazine compound, has been found to exhibit potent anti-influenza virus activity in vitro and in vivo. In a time-of-addition study, it was indicated that T-705 targeted an early to middle stage of the viral replication cycle but had no effect on the adsorption or release stage. The anti-influenza virus activity of T-705 was attenuated by addition of purines and purine nucleosides, including adenosine, guanosine, inosine, and hypoxanthine, whereas pyrimidines did not affect its activity. T-705-4-ribofuranosyl-5′-triphosphate (T-705RTP) and T-705-4-ribofuranosyl-5′-monophosphate (T-705RMP) were detected in MDCK cells treated with T-705. T-705RTP inhibited influenza virus RNA polymerase activity in a dose-dependent and a GTP-competitive manner. Unlike ribavirin, T-705 did not have an influence on cellular DNA or RNA synthesis. Inhibition of cellular IMP dehydrogenase by T-705RMP was about 150-fold weaker than that by ribavirin monophosphate, indicating the specificity of the anti-influenza virus activity and lower level of cytotoxicity of T-705. These results suggest that T-705RTP, which is generated in infected cells, may function as a specific inhibitor of influenza virus RNA polymerase and contributes to the selective anti-influenza virus activity of T-705.


Source

Some more from same site on T-705 CultureD


Some more I found on T-705 "Activity of T-705 in a hamster model of yellow fever virus infection in comparison with that of a chemically related compound, T-1106."
Hamster



[edit on 14-7-2009 by WhiteWash]



posted on Jul, 14 2009 @ 04:27 AM
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This is great stuff- I really appreciate your research. It's good to know the molecular cnfiguration, etc.

Peace,
c



posted on Jul, 14 2009 @ 05:15 AM
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why just last November, in an article at the following link,

Blood protects against long-gone killer


WASHINGTON — Nearly a century after history's most lethal flu faded away, survivors' bloodstreams still carry super-potent protection against the 1918 virus, demonstrating the remarkable durability of the human immune system.

Scientists tested the blood of 32 people aged 92 to 102 who were exposed to the 1918 pandemic flu and found antibodies that still roam the body looking to strangle the old flu strain. Researchers manipulated those antibodies into a vaccine and found that it kept alive all the mice they had injected with the killer flu, according to a study published online in the journal Nature.

There's no pressing need for a 1918 flu vaccine because the virus has long since mutated out of its deadly form and is extremely unlikely to be a threat anymore, experts said. What's more important in this research, they said, is that it confirms theories that our immune system has a steel-trap memory.

"It's incredible. The Lord has blessed us with antibodies our whole lifetime," said study co-author Dr. Eric Altschuler ...


So why the talk of vaccine and mandate?

Follow the money.

And Here

What do we know about the way the virus of 1918 killed?


Scientists discovered a severe immune system reaction was triggered when mice were infected with the recreated virus.

The US team believes the extreme immune response could have provoked the body to begin killing its own cells, making the flu even deadlier.

The study, published in Nature, may aid the hunt for new treatments. The 1918 pandemic took about 50 million lives.

“The host’s immune system may be overreacting and killing off too many cells”
– Dr John Kash University of Washington


So the stronger the immune system, the more likely attacking the virus will cause over-immune system reaction. What does this do besides making the virus lethal as heathy cells are destroyed?


Through functional genomic analysis, they discovered that the mice immune systems responded fiercely to the infection and remained active until the animals’ deaths several days later.


If this is similar, to strong an attack will cause immune system overload and higher likelihood of death.



[edit on 14-7-2009 by imd12c4funn]



posted on Jul, 14 2009 @ 05:46 AM
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Originally posted by CultureD
www.cidrap.umn.edu...



As well, in addition to Relenza and Tamiflu, there are two novel anti-virals to be used if required:

Antiviral and serology findings

Testing antiviral action against the viruses in mice, the researchers found that the pandemic H1N1 virus was susceptible to licensed neuraminidase inhibitors oseltamivir (Tamiflu) and zanamivir (Relenza), as well as an experimental one called R-125489. An experimental broad-spectrum RNA polymerase inhibitor, called compound T-705, was also effective against the pandemic H1N1 virus



[edit on 14-7-2009 by CultureD]


Well that cements the fact to me that this 'swine flu' was man made, that it IS MORE SUSCEPTIBLE to 'Tamiflu', means they had the vaccine but not threat for it to be used against. hence the need for 'swine flu'. and if not then its rather convenient that 'Tamiflu' is great at killing off the flu, Yeah by killing off the host no doubt.



posted on Jul, 14 2009 @ 08:17 AM
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You might find This interesting. "Sensitive But Unclassified (SBU)"





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