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Tiny robot walker made from DNA

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posted on May, 9 2004 @ 09:11 AM
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Read K. Eric Drexler's book Engines of Creation. It has some interesting concepts for how a Nano-Assembler/Disassembler would be build. Book is kinda old though he still calls Russians soviets(book was published it '86). If you do read it I advise you to pay special attention to the chapter entitled Engines of Destruction.




posted on May, 9 2004 @ 12:13 PM
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I might take you up on the offer, see if my library has it in, what sorta subjects are covered?



posted on May, 9 2004 @ 01:26 PM
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aren't you afraid of the new technology?

cuz I am



posted on May, 9 2004 @ 01:48 PM
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Nups, why be afraid of something that you dont know what it can do, thats the problem with modern day society, Always afraid of whats different



posted on May, 9 2004 @ 02:16 PM
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Nups, why be afraid of something that you dont know what it can do, thats the problem with modern day society, Always afraid of whats different


Well, I didn't explain my reason to be afraid of technology but here is :

*technology can be use for both, bad and good,
and obviously I'm afraid of bad purposes.





[Edited on 9-5-2004 by vempire_cnc]



posted on May, 9 2004 @ 02:28 PM
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No need to go to your library or bookstore. Drexler is publishing it for free on his website here's the link.

Engines of Creation




and obviously I'm afraid of bad purposes.


And so am I yet to oppose this technology could give countrys not friendly to the west an advantage in this new arms race which is in my opinion 10 times more dangerous than nukes....in the long term that is. Being able to completely disarm a nation without killing anyone will be sooo seductive to the US/China/Russia...etc you get my point. Already too many people are working on it.

On a more positive note have you heard what the Japanese are planning to do with Nanotubes?? Check this link out.

City in a Pyramid

[Edited on 9-5-2004 by sardion2000]

[Edited on 9-5-2004 by sardion2000]



posted on May, 9 2004 @ 02:46 PM
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Yeah the carbon nano tubes, i started a post about those and they shouuld be cool
especially the pyramid tower



posted on May, 9 2004 @ 02:47 PM
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cool a city with a pyramid shape that can hold 750000 people in japan







[Edited on 9-5-2004 by vempire_cnc]



posted on May, 9 2004 @ 03:19 PM
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When I saw the 1 hr Extreme Engeneering
I sat rivited in my seat for the whole hour it was amazing words cannot describe it.
Another concept that is possible with Nanotubes is the Space Elevator which im sure has been discussed on this site before but here's a link anyway.

The Space Elevator Comes Closer to Reality


[Edited on 9-5-2004 by sardion2000]



posted on May, 9 2004 @ 03:35 PM
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Yeah the space elevator looks pretty cool but I not entirely convinced yet. I think there is a large possibility it could be a total flop if it is ever built.



posted on May, 9 2004 @ 03:52 PM
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Originally posted by UglyBoy
Yeah the space elevator looks pretty cool but I not entirely convinced yet. I think there is a large possibility it could be a total flop if it is ever built.


Yeah a big bendy flop if that thing falls over, where could they position somethin like that from? Would have to be a desert or something surely



posted on May, 9 2004 @ 04:18 PM
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No it wound not flop and fall over here's a quote from the article I provided above.



The competing forces of gravity at the lower end and outward centripetal acceleration at the farther end keep the cable under tension. The cable remains stationary over a single position on Earth.


This is not theory it has been proven mathimatically that it would work, just as its been proven by math that the Nanotube Pyramid would withstand being hit by a 100 ft tidal wave and at least a 7.0 magnitude earthquake(Of which Tokio is known for as well a Volcanoes perfect proving ground). The only thing physics can't explain with math is quantum particles and black holes. Here is another site on the on Space Elevators.

Space Elevator Concept



posted on May, 9 2004 @ 04:36 PM
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Yeah, some will damn it into the ground stating it is impossible etc..., but who knows
would be kinda cool to go into space *mothers input* Could put a huge shopping centre up there



posted on May, 11 2004 @ 12:58 AM
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Originally posted by Stuey1221
Yeah, some will damn it into the ground stating it is impossible etc...

Depends on what type of physist you ask. An astrophsyist who is also familiar with the characteristics of Nanotubes and he would probably agree with me but thats pure speculation on my part. Another day, another step forward in the race toward our collective molecular destiny(not literally I hope:hey




A method for tying tiny knots in and around nanotubes has been developed that could lead to new ways of manipulating materials at the molecular level.



"To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of creating knots and entanglements in a fluid matrix," say the researchers. "The knot is self-tightening, remains tight after it has been formed, and is stable for prolonged periods of time."


Quote source...Nanotubes Knotted Up
Scientist's have also come up with a molecular convey system more info at this link



posted on May, 13 2010 @ 02:58 AM
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Article excerpt from The Wall Street Journal

For the first time, microscopic robots made from DNA molecules can walk, follow instructions and work together to assemble simple products on an atomic-scale assembly line, mimicking the machinery of living cells, two independent research teams announced Wednesday.

These experimental devices, described in the journal Nature, are advances in DNA nanotechnology, in which bioengineers are using the molecules of the genetic code as nuts, bolts, girders and other building materials, on a scale measured in billionths of a meter. The effort, which combines synthetic chemistry, enzymology, structural nanotechnology and computer science, takes advantage of the unique physical properties of DNA molecules to assemble shapes according to predictable chemical rules.

Until now, such experiments had yielded molecular novelties, from smiley faces so small that a billion can fit in a teaspoon to molecule-size boxes with lids that can be opened, closed and locked with a DNA key.

These new construction projects bring researchers a step closer to a time when, at least in theory, scientists might be able to build test-tube factories that churn out self-assembling computers, rare chemical compounds or autonomous medical robots able to cruise the human bloodstream.






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