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Schools gain more power over parents

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posted on Jun, 28 2009 @ 07:53 AM
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uk.news.yahoo.com...

I don't like the sound of this at all.
There are crooked teachers out there who may cause trouble with this power for dislike of a specific student even if that student has done nothing wrong.
I had a teacher who disliked me because I never agreed with him and his religious beliefs

This to me is going to cause more problems




posted on Jun, 28 2009 @ 09:06 AM
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It just keeps piling up.
There is no freakking way this would pass in Canada...and I agree with you, teachers aren't the most hard-working people in society, and have a tendency towards self-righteousness, IMO.

I wonder if since they get all this power, they'd then have to be held accountable on certain actions of the child? Makes sense to me, and if it were proposed, many teachers who wanted this to happen, magically wouldn't.



posted on Jun, 28 2009 @ 09:46 AM
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I actually thinks it could be a good thing.
I know my child goes to school and is affected by these Disruptive children in class.

My child has had to attend detention through others in the class as detentions affect the whole class. If one child is being disruptive the teachers make the whole class stay behind.
On a few occassions iv had to phone my child at school to find out were she is becuase she is late home and iv been worryed for her safty.

And when they do hold the class back 15 - 20 mins after school the children are not allowed to inform their parents.




[edit on 28/6/09 by Ezappa]

[edit on 28/6/09 by Ezappa]



posted on Jun, 28 2009 @ 09:51 AM
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reply to post by Destroyed
 


Ed Balls from his picture looks like a crazy man. I am always suspicious of people who demand a hundred percent approval and want no scrutiny at all directed their way. It is especially dangerous when such people work with children.



posted on Jun, 28 2009 @ 10:03 AM
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reply to post by eradown
 


Yeah he does look pretty nuts

I'm very weary of this idea I don't think it'll be a good thing. I just have a bad feeling about this. The government seems to be introducing very "forceful" laws all over the world or at least trying to



posted on Jun, 28 2009 @ 10:26 AM
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OK, to destroyed and heyo,

Do you know the type of student that this aimed at? I can assure that it is not aimed at students that teachers simply dislike. Do you have any idea of the multiple levels of beaucracy that exist within a school and how many people would have to be invovled in this to get any kind of action taken at all?

Are you aware how damned difficult it is to get a parent into court over not sending their child to school?

The type of student that this is aiming at are the kind of students I teach.

The ones who assault other students in class.
The ones who set fire to classrooms.
The ones who assault teachers.
The ones who destory property.

I'm quite happy to put up with all of this, because it doesn't happen in my classroom becuase I can handle them - around the school though is a different story.

This will not affect those students who are constantly distrupting the learning of others with silly low level disruption.

I think it's a good idea - shame it's never gonna work properly - as is the case with most government education policies. Why don't they just let us teach?

And as for the comment about teachers not being the most hard working people???

You have no idea just how hard working 99% of teachers are. We flog ourselves half to death for our students. I find that comment disrespectful and offensive. Spend a month doing my job then tell me I'm lazy. I've had student teachers who are in tears after an hour because they can't cope with the students I teach day after day.

Oh, sorry, am I sounding a little self-righteous there?

Peace,

MGGG



posted on Jun, 28 2009 @ 10:26 AM
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In the UK, people under the age of 19 are entitled to an education. It's a Right enshrined in law. Not everyone values an education and moreover, not everyone's parents value education either. They represent a small minority of families...but they do exist.

Schools act like microcosms of society and have rules and expectations of appropriate behavior. Without these a school couldn't function any more than society could. Now, if a teenage boy comes to school late, misses scholl, disrupts lessons or refuses detentions...what is the school to do?

They contact the parent or carer and explain the issues and ask for support. The parent/carer refuses to support the school and thereby allows the boy to exist outside the rules and expectations of the school. The boy is immune to sanctions and will increase their negative behavior. The knock on effect is increased disruption of lessons that undermines the learning experience of other pupils. Others might join the boy and then even more pupils' educations are damaged.

The school is left with two options...allow the boy to continue unsanctioned or permanently exclude him. This moves the problem...we still have a boy that is immune to sanctions. His chances as an adult are diminished and he'd probably become a parent with the same attitude to education as his parent/carer...the cycle continues.

This proposed extra sanction that would encourage the neglectful parent/carer to support their child in education would be an action of last resort. I think some ATS members might be surprised to find that some parents out there are crap human beings. This minority don't give a damn for the prospects of their children. Some of them couldn't care less about their kids. These self-centered people catapult their kids into a future as adults wholly unprepared for society and into the nets of welfare and criminal justice.

An early intervention can save lives and help to break the cycle that leads to several generations in one family never having a job.

reply to post by machinegun_go_go
Well said. Teaching is very frickin hard and teachers have better things to do than pick on pupils 'they don't like.' I'm not saying it's the hardest job in the world...but it's up there.

[edit on 28-6-2009 by Kandinsky]



posted on Jun, 28 2009 @ 10:32 AM
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reply to post by Kandinsky
 


A voice of reason.

Eloquently put.

I just ranted. LOL.

Am I right in imagining you are/have been involved in our wonderful world of education?

Peace,

MGGG



posted on Jun, 28 2009 @ 10:39 AM
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i am always ready to jump and defend the rights of people, but this rule is like a last ditch effort to get kids to straighten up their acts

kids are getting way out of hand , and if the parent sends their kids to school they should help out and keep them peaceful

just youtube around and watch what kind of videos kids make these days



bring back some of that old fashion discipline


CX

posted on Jun, 28 2009 @ 10:39 AM
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Not a bad thing IMO, then again i am actively involved in my kids schooling and they have beeb brought up respectful and they behave in and out of school (at the moment)

There are many parents out there who don't give a damn about their kids though, so if they have to be "encouraged", to take notice or how thier kids behave, then i don't see anything wrong with that.

Every case is different though. Not all disruptive kids are just naughty kids. Not all disruptive kids have bad parents who don't try.

To0 lock a parent up will just make the issue worse if you ask me.
CX.



posted on Jun, 28 2009 @ 10:52 AM
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I agree that this could be a good thing when used as a last resort. Personally I think it boils down to the parents not teaching respectful manners or morals, and not disciplining their kids when they do things wrong.

There seems to be a stigma against parents disciplining their kids with anything other than some stern words and time-out, but in reality, that doesn't always work. Either discipline properly and accordingly for the child's actions, or discipline the parents for not being qualified to be parents.



posted on Jun, 28 2009 @ 10:54 AM
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reply to post by machinegun_go_go
 



I wonder where you were when I was in school? Lol. I've no sympathy for people who step into the kitchen but can't cook. apparently you're a good teacher, and that's great, and no, i didn't mean to offend you. I'm just writing from experience is all.

the fact is that the answers to these problems can already be addressed via expulsion. Kids setting fire to things? expulsion...etc? expulsion...get me?

why the need for these rules?
I guess we're all to just sit back and believe that it's not going to get abused, this power, simply because you say so?

I remember the "gifted" program, an excuse to have us sit around marking work for teachers...their leaving class constantly...no one's around after like four pm....two months off during the summer and nowadays they're getin' like a day off every two weeks at my boss's daughter's/son's school....maybe that's not lazy, but it's somethin'.


[edit on 28-6-2009 by heyo]



posted on Jun, 28 2009 @ 10:57 AM
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reply to post by CX
 



Every case is different though. Not all disruptive kids are just naughty kids. Not all disruptive kids have bad parents who don't try. To0 lock a parent up will just make the issue worse if you ask me. CX.

Fair enough...each case IS different. The point of the proposal (if the Govt don't fudge it as usual) isn't to lock up parents...it's to force them to take an interest in their child's education. Decent parents/carers wouldn't be affected. It would hopefully be used on the hardcore minority that condemn their children to bleak futures without education or basic social skills.

It's more an indictment on society that we should even be talking about legally ensuring a parent's involvement in securing their child's future. Believe me, there are families, parents and carers out there that will ignore legal sanctions no matter what...



posted on Jun, 28 2009 @ 11:06 AM
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I don't think fining the parents will help either. TV parents most kids these days. That's were they get their ideas usually. Parents can't be blamed for everything that is wrong with a child so I believe this system will cause more harm than good. Maybe in a few cases all will go well but in others someone who shouldn't be blamed will be



posted on Jun, 28 2009 @ 11:44 AM
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reply to post by Destroyed
 


If kids are learning this from TV, don't you think it should be up to the parents to monitor what they view? Kids respond differently to violence on the media. Some can take it as entertainment, some take joy in it, some act it out. It's up to the parents to see where their kids stand and if they are acting out that violence, to remove that link in the home, whether they are copying it from TV or their own actions.

If you just put your kids in front of a TV, sure its easy and makes your job easier, but if you expect that to get you off the hook for when they don't behave, then you're just as guilty in my book!

[edit on 28-6-2009 by kyle6677]



posted on Jun, 28 2009 @ 11:57 AM
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The UK needs to have a shift in thought and stop finding reasons to support the will of disruptive and unruly pupils over the attempts of dedicated professionals to do their job. A job which is ultimately aimed at benefitting the lives of the pupils.

There are many things about British society and our attitude toward the youth that set us up for the problems we are now struggling to find a solution to.

Teachers in Britain, in my opinion, are now expected to perform duties way beyond those of just educators. Teachers must now play the role of educator, social worker and parent - and must hit impossible targets in each role.

I, for one, welcome any legislation that supports the teacher. In today's Britain, it's no mean feat. If it gives today's apathetic parents more reason to pull their weight and feel the full responsibility of raising another human being, all the better.



posted on Jun, 28 2009 @ 12:04 PM
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reply to post by kyle6677
 


Yes I agree but even if a child isn't allowed watch tv they'll go to a friends house and watch tv there and then wonder why they're not allowed watch themselves and raise questions. The point is even if you ban your child from tv at home they'll still find a way to see it whether its at school or at a friends house and the psychological effect it'll have will probably be worse on the child who wasn't exposed to tv before. It's like never letting a child have sugar and they eat one sweet after several years of no sugar and then they're addicted to it. Small amounts is what is needed. Let the child watch tv but be careful about what they watch but sooner or later they're going to have a chance to discover something they shouldn't when the parents guard is down or something similar. It's like with the school thing: Let the teachers make complaints to the parents or expel the child but fining the parents or putting them in jail is too far. Parents are the main influence in a child's life but teachers, other students an many other things influence a child. You can't blame it all on the parents!!!! I support teachers but I support Parents too



posted on Jun, 28 2009 @ 12:09 PM
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reply to post by Destroyed
 


I never said ban TV altogether, I just said monitor what they watch. In essence, I agree with you! I just feel if parents blame TV for their kids actions, that is just reflective of their lack of ability as a parent, putting them still at fault. TV is fine as long as its in moderation and the parents know what the kids are watching, and it is up to them to determine if it is appropriate or not.

It's kind of impossible these days to shield children from many things, so as long as you make clear what is acceptable, what is right, and what is wrong, and be a responsible parent about it all, thats the best you can do.


[edit on 28-6-2009 by kyle6677]



posted on Jun, 29 2009 @ 02:32 PM
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Originally posted by kyle6677
reply to post by Destroyed
 


It's kind of impossible these days to shield children from many things, so as long as you make clear what is acceptable, what is right, and what is wrong, and be a responsible parent about it all, thats the best you can do.



Too true my friend. Too true



posted on Jul, 17 2009 @ 10:29 PM
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The schools have this power because parents keep volunteering their children to serve as persons/citizens in these prison-like credit facilities. For every shift the child serves, someone is profiting big.



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