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New Exotic Material Could Revolutionize Electronics

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posted on Jun, 17 2009 @ 02:07 AM
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ScienceDaily (June 16, 2009) — Move over, silicon—it may be time to give the Valley a new name. Physicists at the Department of Energy's (DOE) SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have confirmed the existence of a type of material that could one day provide dramatically faster, more efficient computer chips.


www.sciencedaily.com...


I can see this technology enhancing other breakthroughs like three dimensional nano-scale integrated circuits, Texas Instruments next generation contactless smart card chip that will be faster, and have greater memory and use less power.




posted on Jun, 17 2009 @ 02:37 AM
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reply to post by Eight
 


Great find! This could lead to ultra-efficient and fast computers!

If anyone isn't familiar. Bismuth is a strongly diamagnetic material. Diamagnetism which is even stronger with superconductors. Perhaps they took advantage of this property.

Bismuth has also been associated with flying saucer technology



posted on Jun, 17 2009 @ 02:37 AM
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sweet.

I hope they could use it soon, I'm so desperate to see what the future holds with technology.



posted on Jun, 23 2009 @ 08:38 PM
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Room temperature superconductors?

This is exiting indeed...

I would love to see if they couple this bismuth telluride with carbon nanotubes.

The future looks very interesting.

-Edrick



posted on Jun, 24 2009 @ 12:00 AM
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Spintronic devices have created enormous advances in microelectronics, leading to faster, instant-on start times and orders-of-magnitude increases in data storage capacity. Spintronics is short for spin transport electronics – electronic devices that use the spin of an electron to carry information.


www.sciencedaily.com...


Google Video Link


very interesting indeed



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