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Arrested teens can lose school rites

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posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 02:23 PM
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Arrested teens can lose school rites


www.pennlive.com

May is the season for high school musicals and senior proms. It's also a time when teens are arrested on charges of underage drinking and other summary criminal offenses.

When behavior rules apply outside of school, students who are arrested can lose school activities for 30 days or more. Some seniors have been barred from participating in their high school graduation ceremonies.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 02:23 PM
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I will be the first to agree the youth of today are lazy, unmotivated and need discipline more than ever, but what the hell business is it of the school if my child gets in to trouble after school hours, off of school grounds. How can a child be legally punished for an offense of this nature?

This really hit a nerve with me! If this rule would have applied to my school, there would have been no one attending graduation ceremonies. We had what was called senior skip day a week before graduation. Even our class valedictorian had some drinks and blew off some steam.

I really feel sorry for my children when they go to school with the BS no tolerance policies schools have in place now. No wonder home school attendances are on the rise.

www.pennlive.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 02:43 PM
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reply to post by Mudman21
 


I am very puzzled that a newspaper would make such a mistake!!

I am referring to the homonym "rites" versus "rights"....which is the word the gist of the article seems to be about.

Did I miss something, in English class??? Not the OP's fault, obviously (I had to check the link, just to be sure....). Perhaps it's a joke? I mean....spellcheck can't fix stupid, when the word is spelled correctly, but out of context!

Anyway....good advice, in every case: Consider the Source!!!!!



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 04:00 PM
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reply to post by weedwhacker
 


Are you saying it is supposed to be rights, not rites? Which isn't the case. The article is definitely referring to a rite, as in a rite of passage, as in many cultures of the rite of passage from a boy to a man. In the modern scholastic sense, the rite of passage from sensational proms-and-activities highschool to the real world.

It was rite as a ceremony-type thing, maybe the word rite was used as an irony - showing that RIGHTS are being taken away as well...



www.merriam-webster.com...

Main Entry:rite
Pronunciation:\ˈrīt\
Function:noun
Etymology:Middle English, from Latin ritus; akin to Greek arithmos number — more at arithmetic
Date:14th century
1 a: a prescribed form or manner governing the words or actions for a ceremony b: the ceremonial practices of a church or group of churches
2: a ceremonial act or action



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 04:10 PM
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reply to post by shanerz
 


OK...I will re-read....perhaps I missed the clever choice of words, if in fact the author at the paper was indeed so inclined.

I guess....with the confluence of texting....and the shorthand that results from the thumbs....I jumped to a conclusion that may be incorrect.

("rite" as a shorthand homonym for 'right'....)

But, clever catch, if you are correct!!! Kudos!!!

EDIT...color my face red!!!! Yes, I see now, how that was a clever use of a homonym....I read it too fast, at first, to notice....

I love denying ignorance!!! Even when it's my own, I have to deny!!


[edit on 6/1/0909 by weedwhacker]



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