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Uncovering Our Earliest Ancestor: The Link BBC program

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posted on May, 18 2009 @ 10:18 AM
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So there is talk of what programme may be aired on the History channel on the 25th of May, and some talk of what the BBC adverts are for.
Well the answer to te BBC programe to be shown on the 26th of May is a show called "Uncovering Our Earliest Ancestor: The Link" presented by David Attenborough. To be aired at 9pm on BBC1


BBC One brings viewers the story behind what could be one of the most important scientific discoveries of the 21st century. The film, narrated by Sir David Attenborough, is set to throw extraordinary new light on our understanding of human evolution.

www.bbc.co.uk...

More info to be released tomorrow on the 19th.
This could be a huge discovery in finding the so called missing link. Have they found it? How would affect peoples views on life and religion, im sure this show will stir up many a debate over mankinds origin.



[edit on 18-5-2009 by pazcat]




posted on May, 18 2009 @ 10:41 AM
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reply to post by pazcat
 


thats the conference for the Lemur tomorrow... but the history channel one claims a press conference THEN the show immediately afterwards along with a media blitz

it lends some support to the idea it's two events purposefully done at the same time..

[edit on 17/05/09 by Raider of Truth]



posted on May, 18 2009 @ 10:45 AM
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Well even if it is a seperate story, the Lemur and the BBC show do claim to have some pretty significant finds in the field of Natural history, quite possibly finds that just cant be ignored. I know not everybody will be excited by a 'monkey', but if it is the so called link, that is still pretty huge. And will change the history books at least. I would also expect further backlash towards Attenborough than he already gets. Not from me though.

[edit on 18-5-2009 by pazcat]



posted on May, 18 2009 @ 04:36 PM
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Uncovering Our Earliest Ancestor: The Link

It's amazing how an organization as big as the BBC manages to get something like this so totally wrong. This lemur-monkey thingy sure as hell is not our earliest ancestor.



posted on May, 18 2009 @ 04:44 PM
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There is no guarantee this show is about the Lemur monkey, it may be it may not. But it claims to present us with some big breakthrough about the missing link. And well if you dont believe in the missing link it shouldnt be to much a problem, but for others its a potentially huge find. Ill wait till tomorrow when the further information is posted on the BBC link maybe it will give more insight.
To add the show might even be a 6 part series, but that is not confirmed.

[edit on 18-5-2009 by pazcat]



posted on May, 18 2009 @ 05:17 PM
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reply to post by pazcat
 

Ever since the field of genetics was established I'd say there has been no "missing link".


[edit on 18-5-2009 by rhinoceros]



posted on May, 18 2009 @ 05:21 PM
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David Attenborough!!!
*very excited*

He's such a great narrator. I can't wait, I'm very excited to see this program. I always had assumed Lucy was our earliest ancestor. But I do agree that genetics and DNA have made it pretty obvious as to where we came from...



posted on May, 18 2009 @ 05:33 PM
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the daily mail

The fossilised bones, which are thought to be between 37 and 47million years old, were found in Germany’s Messel Shale Pit, a disused quarry near Frankfurt famous for its fossils.The team who examined the young female animal say it has some resemblance to a lemur, a mammal with a distinctive tail that is found to this day in the forests of Madagascar.
But Sir David’s documentary will explain that the researchers have, controversially, concluded the fossil ‘is not simply a lemur’ but from a related group of primates which evolved into monkeys, apes and human beings.
The BBC programme is based on a scientific study to be published by the Public Library of Science, a leading academic journal with offices in Cambridge and San Francisco.
Last night, the study’s co-author, Philip Gingerich, the president-elect of the US Paleontological Society, said: ‘I examined this skeleton. It is exceptionally complete and it is well-dated.
We have kept it under wraps because you can’t blither about something until you understand it. We now understand it. It is going to advance our knowledge of evolution.’


So i guess why this discovery has taken a while is basically they were checking their numbers, sure DNA and genetics makes life easier, but its always better to be thoroughly researched before making such startling claims.



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