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Sinner absolving sinner?

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posted on Apr, 25 2004 @ 06:48 PM
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A Roman Catholic priest from my city has been charged with the murder of a nun back in 1980.
This brought a question to mind...
If this priest truly did commit this crime and say he has absolved people of their sins and so forth, is it valid? Can a sinner absolve a sinner? I've looked up the definition of absolve but I didn't know if it had a deeper meaning when applied to religion. Any input would be appreciated.




posted on Apr, 25 2004 @ 07:43 PM
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that depends on your view than someone elses take on this.

if a person is truly sorry for something they have done should they be forgiven? sure, it doesnt excuse them and doesnt free them from that sin however it just means you dont hold it against them as god will judge them for it(or forgives if the person truly repents). they still have an earthly price to pay for whatever sin they commit and should be paid, such as prison time.

humans are not perfect and depending on what you believe none of us are without sin so how can one absolve another's sin if this is true? we are not always asking the person we are talking to for forgiveness, we are also asking god for his forgiveness and only his forgiveness has weight in heavan.



posted on Apr, 25 2004 @ 07:45 PM
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Thats an interesting question, especially when you remember also the number of Catholic priests charged with child abuse.

I would have thought that unless a priest was absolved of his own sins, then his own acts of absolution would be invalid. Similarly a Catholic is not supposed to accept the eucharist while in a state of sin, so has to go to confession beforehand.



posted on Apr, 26 2004 @ 06:15 PM
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Assuming the sinner seeking absolution is sincere, then I don't believe the state of the absolving priests soul is at issue. Remember, all of us are sinners. That includes priests, bishops and the pope. In fact the pope receives the sacrament of reconcilliation weekly. I guess the only thing I'd like to check on the subject is if being in a state of mortal sin may impede the priest's ability to give absolution. No idea where to look forr that answer. I don't think it's in the Catechism but it may be in the Code of Canon Law. (Yeah, you might have guessed, I'm Catholic.)



posted on Apr, 26 2004 @ 06:19 PM
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Originally posted by Pisky

I would have thought that unless a priest was absolved of his own sins, then his own acts of absolution would be invalid. Similarly a Catholic is not supposed to accept the eucharist while in a state of sin, so has to go to confession beforehand.


Pisky,
Accepting the Eucharist is "OK" if you're in a state of venial sin, mortal sin is where the problems start. Ouch! Mortal sin is knowingly and intentionally violating any of the 10 Commandments.



posted on Apr, 26 2004 @ 08:42 PM
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Originally posted by CommonSense
Pisky,
Accepting the Eucharist is "OK" if you're in a state of venial sin, mortal sin is where the problems start. Ouch! Mortal sin is knowingly and intentionally violating any of the 10 Commandments.


Thanks for that, CommonSense. It's been many a year since I attended Mass and if I ever went back to Catholicism, I'd probably be in the confessional for at least a week (probably need a season ticket too
)



posted on Apr, 29 2004 @ 03:46 PM
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Hey, I'm only human. I've got a free lifetime pass! (Thank God)



posted on Apr, 29 2004 @ 06:03 PM
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I was always taught that the only person who can forgive sins is God. Methinks the Catholic church is playing powergames with people's lives, and has done so since its inception.



posted on Apr, 29 2004 @ 06:31 PM
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Its a very good question Pand.. and one that displays one of the features of Cathlocism not often mentioned.

Sinners cannot absolve sinners. The entire concept is not biblical. The action of confession is merely the rituals of people who don't understand what Christ did, and who he is.

Its nonsence, and meaningless in the greater spiritual scheme of things.

Your question provides one of those logical tests that show its nonsence.

Whatever the initial meaning behind confession, which ever pre-christian rite it has come from, has been lost and through syncretism, has come to be assumed to be biblical. It is not biblical, it is nothing more than a ritual devoid of any spiritual reality.



posted on Apr, 29 2004 @ 06:48 PM
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Maybe I should get one of these



Get out of Hell free card



posted on Apr, 29 2004 @ 08:17 PM
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Originally posted by Netchicken
Sinners cannot absolve sinners. The entire concept is not biblical. The action of confession is merely the rituals of people who don't understand what Christ did, and who he is.


Your statement makes sense to me. That's what I was thinking but couldn't put the words together to make sense *lol*.
I grew up going to the Catholic church but have not been to any church for many years. You may see several questions from me on religion from time to time but not to debate about. I only ask so that I may learn more and get different perspectives.

Thanks to everyone else and your opinions as well






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