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Mad science and secret codes in the TV series Fringe

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posted on Apr, 3 2009 @ 06:08 AM
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Bad Robot, the production company behind the Fox TV series Fringe, is no stranger to involving audiences in Easter egg hunts. Lost, their best known series, is peppered with them. Untold numbers of websites are dedicated to tracking these visual clues, which on Lost range from the mysterious sequence of numbers (4, 8, 15, 16, 23, and 42) to Egyptian hieroglyphs to shark fins tattooed with the Dharma logo.
If Lost set the standard, Fringe has picked up the challenge and run. The producers readily admit they have created any number of challenges and embedded them into each episode.




The games The puzzle component of Fringe is something that the show's creators have described as optional extras. You can watch the show, enjoy the story, and move on. Or you can stick around and accept their invitation to play. This engagement strategy has been a huge success for Lost and is just starting to gain an audience and awareness for Fringe. Unlike Lost, where clues come and go almost randomly, Fringe games are part of each and every episode. You can watch the show and know that you can participate in any of several games.





Highlight the repeating motifs. Scattered through each episode are little visual tweaks. Posters for Massive Dynamics products, the fictional company that lies near the heart of the show's conspiracies can often be found on walls and billboards in the background. Also recurring are patterns of "green green green red," a light sequence that was central to episode 8, but which has appeared on binocular readouts and on knit hats as well. Several viewers have spotted repeated "He's not dead" messages, apparently referring to FBI Agent Dunham's "was he or was he not a traitor" boyfriend, on grave stones and in stairwells. Website FringeTelevision.com offers the most comprehensive watch for these visual motifs.


The complete story is via the Link below. Some great pictures and I am sure us ATS'ers will love the cheallenge in working this out.



arstechnica.com...





posted on May, 1 2009 @ 11:57 AM
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Walter is one of the most original characters to come out in a long time. I watch Fringe pretty much just to see that guy...

Show most people the body of someone whose orifices all closed up, and they run screaming...Walter? He looks as giddy as a kid at Christmas!
(and then becomes fascinated with something as simple as a heated car seat...) priceless.....



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