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Recurve bow advice.

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CX

posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 02:17 PM
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Firstly, i've never used bows before, other than making them out of sticks in the woods lol, so i need some advice please about bow weights.

I recently purchased this kids bow for my young daughters, just something for a bit of fun in the garden, and maybe grab their interest for taking up archery as a sport....

Kids Armex 20lb recurve bow

Now of course, dad had to try it out first
and i must admit i was well impressed at the power for a kids bow. Definately not a toy, put it that way!

Anyway, it is slightly too small for me, i'm only 5ft 9, but i need a slightly bigger bow with a longer draw.

I have very restricted access to anywhere that sells bows here, so i would be buying over the net working on a guess at the right size.

Now the kids one i bought was by a company called Armex, it's made from an ABS moulded handle and fibreglass limbs. Despite being the cheaper end of the market, it seems solid and great for getting started.

So i looked at adult ones, and i found this....

65lb Armex recurve bow

I need some advice about the draw weight. It says it is a 65lb recurve bow, with a draw weight of 40lbs. Is that quite a high draw weight for a bow? I mean is this quite a lot for someone starting out? I have a fair bit of strength, but am not sure if this would be classed as a "hard to draw" kind of weight?

I would like a bow that i could get some "distance" out of it, i don't want a bow that just shoots 30 yards and the arrow drops. I would be using this for acrhery for now, but bearing in mind i am posting this in the survival forum...lets just say i'd like something that has a bit of oomph in it.

Thanks for any advice. I'll give the shop a ring tomorrow and ask advice there too.

CX.




posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 02:34 PM
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Originally posted by CX
Firstly, i've never used bows before, other than making them out of sticks in the woods lol, so i need some advice please about bow weights.

I recently purchased this kids bow for my young daughters, just something for a bit of fun in the garden, and maybe grab their interest for taking up archery as a sport....

Kids Armex 20lb recurve bow

Now of course, dad had to try it out first
and i must admit i was well impressed at the power for a kids bow. Definately not a toy, put it that way!

Anyway, it is slightly too small for me, i'm only 5ft 9, but i need a slightly bigger bow with a longer draw.

I have very restricted access to anywhere that sells bows here, so i would be buying over the net working on a guess at the right size.

Now the kids one i bought was by a company called Armex, it's made from an ABS moulded handle and fibreglass limbs. Despite being the cheaper end of the market, it seems solid and great for getting started.

So i looked at adult ones, and i found this....

65lb Armex recurve bow

I need some advice about the draw weight. It says it is a 65lb recurve bow, with a draw weight of 40lbs. Is that quite a high draw weight for a bow? I mean is this quite a lot for someone starting out? I have a fair bit of strength, but am not sure if this would be classed as a "hard to draw" kind of weight?

I would like a bow that i could get some "distance" out of it, i don't want a bow that just shoots 30 yards and the arrow drops. I would be using this for acrhery for now, but bearing in mind i am posting this in the survival forum...lets just say i'd like something that has a bit of oomph in it.

Thanks for any advice. I'll give the shop a ring tomorrow and ask advice there too.

CX.




Woah there STOP, A beginer like yourself needs to be measured up and fitted with a bow best suited to your build and strength. your local archey club/ store will help you choose, most beginners start of with a bow of around 26 to 30 lb @ 30 inch, First get online and get a quicks Catalogue and see what kit is on offer, you can get excellent deals on starter kits, BUT, Most decent shops will NOT sell you a bow until you have done 6 weeks basic course with an archery club. The problem is ( and I guiarentee they are correct) that the bow you are happy with on week one will be no use to you 6 weeks later cos your technique, draw strength, style etc wiill have changed. PLEASE dont waste your money now, Join a 6 on a basic six week course cost averages about 30 Quid if you use their training bows. After 6 weeks you will know much better what length, draw, arrow length etc ypou need to get a good survivalist archery kit. PLEASE feel free to U2U me if you want more information. Quite a few survies use Recurves, but some like Long Bows or Hungarian bows etc, you need to study more on what you need and the best place is with a Quicks catalgue.

My kit took me 3 months to choose and is still evolving but its part of my Bug out kit now



No idea why I cant get the image to upload, sorry, this forum is getting harder and harder to use every day. But clicking on the box takes you to the image

Respects
NR



[edit on 10-3-2009 by Northern Raider]


CX

posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 02:45 PM
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Thanks NR, your advice is much appreciated.


I guess i'm impatient like that


Then again, i haven't the money to go changing bows willy nilly, so i'll listen to what you said and arrange a visit to a shop/club.

Cheers.

CX.



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 02:46 PM
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you say your 5'9" tall..... if very average your draw length will be between 28-29"
Recurves are very forgiving, the way they are rated is @ a specific draw length(recurves have NO specic draw lenth!) of 28" so as to be able to "base" draw weight of one bow to another.
If you have a 65# @ 28" bow.........
and I got a 55# @ 28 inch bow, you could see without experimenting which is stronger.....
65# @ 28" is very average! Even a novice, would want a draw weight of at least 50#........65# is average.......85# plus not unheard of...
That help any, get the picture?



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 02:50 PM
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reply to post by CX
 


You're always going to get some 'drop' in the arrow flight path anyway.
It's part of the skill accounting for it in your aim,as well as elevation to target,wind conditions and estimated travelling speed of target too.

PETRON Do a nice easy,cheap take-down recurve.
www.abarchery.com...

Easy to restring and pack away.

Draw weight,size of bow etc is very dependent on your technique as well as physical conditioning.

I have a 60lb compound that my 25 stone brother cant budge,but I move it easily enough at 90kgs purely due to practise and technique.

To start with you want to really be looking at around 30-35lb draw weight as a guesstimate here.
Any more than that and you'll simply get too fatigued too soon to practise for any length of time.

It'll still be ample enough to kill small game in a 'sit-x shopping for wabbit in a post-legal, mad max scenario.'



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 02:57 PM
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Originally posted by CX
Thanks NR, your advice is much appreciated.


I guess i'm impatient like that


Then again, i haven't the money to go changing bows willy nilly, so i'll listen to what you said and arrange a visit to a shop/club.

Cheers.

CX.


Where in the UK are you? One of the very best shops in the Uk is in Guisborough North Yorks, Custom Built Archery , they have a web site , phone em on 01623 871560.. I was lucky cos when I took up archery I joined a club up here in co durham and the instructor was an Ex SAS guy who kept me straight for the duration of the course.

[edit on 10-3-2009 by Northern Raider]



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 03:14 PM
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reply to post by CX
 


I missed the part where you said you had already purchased the smaller bow for the kids..


Use that as a guide..
Could you imagine pulling back two of them at the same time for an hours practise at a time?


I do believe it's still a forgotten bylaw that all males of a suitable age must practise archery..
Use it in case you knock a passing bobby's helmet off with a duff shot.


I found ye olde reference supporting that..



The Longbow

Bows have long been known in England. They were used in the Neolithic period, by Ancient Britons and Romans, Saxons and Vikings. Harold II is alleged to have died with an arrow in his eye, at the battle of Hastings, as depicted on the Bayeux Tapestry. The bows of this time were short bows, about four foot long, with a draw weight of 40 - 50 pounds. They were good for hunting, and against unarmoured opponents. (Chain mail is useless against arrows)

www.pomian.demon.co.uk...


To ensure that there were sufficient archers for the armies, the laws were passed requiring all men from the ages of 12 to 65 to practice weekly. Football (which at the time resembled no-rules rugby with teams of 100 or more) was banned, to prevent people being injured so they could not practice. The practice was so strenuous that the skeletons of archers were slightly deformed.



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 03:21 PM
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NR hit the nail right on the head with the first post. And like AgentT said you will develop your strength and technique to pull a heavier bow with easy. I used to shoot traditional...wood shafts, no sights and no stabilizers, only one string nock when I was in the SCA.

I will add that you will enjoy the benefits of archery once you get over snapping your wrist with the bow string. The bow will find muscles you never knew you had.

A 65lbs bow at your draw length will be a flat shot at 20-25yards. For shots less than 30 yards I would recommend learning to instinctive shoot. At 30 yards and above, you have to rely on aiming and lots of practice to learn how the arc works.

In using modern arrows, the randomness is reduced of how some shafts will drift as they bend in flight.



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 05:44 PM
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Originally posted by Ahabstar
I will add that you will enjoy the benefits of archery once you get over snapping your wrist with the bow string.


Ahhh yes..Just one of the pleasures that'll get you hooked on archery.
Always remember to accessorise like with any outfit.

On the left we have Ahabstar sporting the latest design of bracer,fashioned in finest mink...


Seriously though.Do pick up even a cheapie bracer,it'll help get you through those first tech pointers without it feeling like a course of aversion therapy.


I deliberately went for a compound a fraction smaller just to keep a little bend in the elbow.

All this talk has rekindled my desire to look for a Mongolian horse bow again.. I might even have access to a horse soon too.

[edit on 10-3-2009 by AGENT_T]



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 04:58 AM
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[i

All this talk has rekindled my desire to look for a Mongolian horse bow again.. I might even have access to a horse soon too.

[edit on 10-3-2009 by AGENT_T]


GHuy in our club used Mongolians bows for years, but now swears by the very similar Hungarian bow as available from Quicks



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 05:24 AM
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And if you are curious about the coveting of the Mongolian, it is because it has the best of several worlds.

You have an even more reduced bow length than the recurve versus a long bow and mimics the let off of a compound at draw length without the complexity or problems of the cams.

The downside is that you leave the bow strung all the time. But with the let off, you can hold the bow drawn without the strain and fatigue while aiming.

When told the price of admission for a good one, I had to hand it back before temptation overwhelmed my better judgment...I admit there was a quiet tear in my eye. Damn my long arms.


CX

posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 05:36 AM
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Thanks for all the great replies, lots of info that will be a great help, as well as saving me a few pennies no doubt.


I live down South, i've had a look and my nearest Quicks dealer is an hour away, so i could make a day of it and go and take a look.

Thanks for that.

CX.



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 05:51 AM
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reply to post by Ahabstar
 


Very fine explanation of the benefits


It was the 'let off' that drew me to the wonders of the compound bow.
It just has to many 'working parts' to be considered a 'survival item' though

But it's just so pretty


I've bought through QUICKS before
www.quicksarchery.co.uk... excellent service..
as have MERLIN archery
www.merlinarcherycentre.co.uk...

For the impatient shopper(like me), Merlin has a superb turn around time.

I get all mesmerised by the pretty pictures every time I look at their sites and end up buying something I TOTALLY don't need
....

Hmm waddya know... Laser sites that'll fit my Shoot through.....



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 11:37 AM
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Some excellent advice Raider and Agent T ...particularly the 'dont buy shiny things until you've done a training course' bit


Have just fired off an email to sign up for the next beginners session at a local club starting in May...should be interesting


For now I'll just have to contend with my mad-professor plans for an arrow-hurling invention of diabolical destruction....I think i'll call it the 'Twang-atron'



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 12:01 PM
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Originally posted by citizen smith
Some excellent advice Raider and Agent T ...particularly the 'dont buy shiny things until you've done a training course' bit


Have just fired off an email to sign up for the next beginners session at a local club starting in May...should be interesting


For now I'll just have to contend with my mad-professor plans for an arrow-hurling invention of diabolical destruction....I think i'll call it the 'Twang-atron'


Talking about fiendish devices I was gobsmacked to find out the chinese over 1000 years ago bulk made semi automatic crossbows capable of firing 30 rounds a minute. there was a working moodel demonstrated on the hiostory channel the other night.



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 03:21 PM
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Originally posted by citizen smith
For now I'll just have to contend with my mad-professor plans for an arrow-hurling invention of diabolical destruction....I think i'll call it the 'Twang-atron'


Are you sure you want to risk it after the 'Catabow' experiments?

I'm still unsure whether I should publish the plans and the parts list for my meager effort.

Was a moderate success..sufficient to cope with a rabbit..even if it just died laughing at them



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 11:45 PM
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Originally posted by Northern Raider
Talking about fiendish devices I was gobsmacked to find out the chinese over 1000 years ago bulk made semi automatic crossbows capable of firing 30 rounds a minute. there was a working moodel demonstrated on the hiostory channel the other night.


The Chu-ko-no is one hell of an invention...not particulary useful without the fast-acting poison reciepe for the tips to go with it though...but i'm sure I could come up with an equally toxic but far slower acting brew, come mushroom season, to dip them in


Was the programme you saw called 'Weapon Masters' by any chance?

The military historian guy who appears on that series, Mike Loades, who specialises in ancient military combat is one amazing guy...I've wondered if he does courses available to the gen public...not to mention his madcap engineer co-presenter Chad, now that is one guy i'd love to work with!


Originally posted by AGENT_T
Are you sure you want to risk it after the 'Catabow' experiments?

I'm still unsure whether I should publish the plans and the parts list for my meager effort. Was a moderate success..sufficient to cope with a rabbit..even if it just died laughing at them


By all means post your plans...if you can tag them to my original 'catabow' thread all the better too


Pity that rabbits dont have wifi though cos otherwise they'd know whats coming in this spring season's "Smith's Killing Catalogue"....Muhahahahaha..hoppity..hoppity..*BOOM*



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 03:54 AM
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Was the programme you saw called 'Weapon Masters' by any chance?



No twas " Ancient Discoverys"



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 04:29 AM
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reply to post by citizen smith
 


May I recommend another good piece of archery tv, weapons that made britain, also a series hosted by Mike. There is 5 or 6 episodes each where they cover one specific weapon. One episode is longbow and it is very educational. It has such things as newbies being taught military archery, making a longbow and longbow vs. crossbow.

reply to post by CX
 


If you go for a more powerful bow I'd advice going to a club and/or shooting with someone who has experience. Technique is very important to know so you wont injure your arm muscles etc. I tried to shoot without knowledge of proper drawing and nearly busted my arms after few draws




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