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Food Safety Problems Slip Past Private Inspectors

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posted on Mar, 5 2009 @ 03:44 PM
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Food Safety Problems Slip Past Private Inspectors


www.nytimes.com

When food industry giants like Kellogg want to ensure that American consumers are being protected from contaminated products, they rely on private inspectors like Eugene A. Hatfield. So last spring Mr. Hatfield headed to the Peanut Corporation of America plant in southwest Georgia to make sure its chopped nuts, paste and peanut butter were safe to use in everything from granola bars to ice cream.

The peanut company, though, knew in advance that Mr. Hatfield was coming.....
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Mar, 5 2009 @ 03:44 PM
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Here we have a classically well-presented article from the New York Times.

In it they manage to demonstrate scenario after scenario where our health is placed at risk

But they fail to mention that this is a governmental responsibility which was delegated to private parties by the politically appointed corporate shills who inhabit agencies like the FDA, the USDA, and others.

They call it "smaller" government. The fact that it is a regulatory function turned over to 'for-profit' commerce seems to elude the authors.

Enjoy the read... so to speak.

www.nytimes.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 02:56 PM
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Yes I laugh and then cry when they call it "smaller" government!
I wonder how much that inspector got paid in salary and bribes; he passed them three times fully knowing they did not have a pass from the health department!

This agency is way out of line.

S&F!


[edit on 6-3-2009 by burntheships]



posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 03:07 PM
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Thanks.

I wonder if anyone could figure out how much this little 'oops' moment ended costing the tax-payers.... we probably don't want to know.

ANother interesting statistic would be how many people die from this kind of 'contamination/toxicity' oversight every year? Somehow they never report that either.



posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 03:31 PM
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Yes, good point! How sad that someone let this go unreported. Think about all the lives saved, people would never have been sickened, and the money that would been spent otherwise.

The recalls have been extensive!



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