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The 'Pyramid of Man' of Ancient Egypt- *A Must See* The Human Form in the Great Pyramid

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posted on Feb, 26 2009 @ 08:53 PM
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**EDIT: I altered the title in the hopes that it'll draw more interest**

I've come across an interesting theory regarding the layout of the chambers, galleries, shafts, and tunnels within the Great Pyramid of Egypt that I hadn't heard of before, but to me seemed to be very plausible. I was quite astonished when I saw it and thought I'd present it here.

Most of us have seen the cross section of the Great Pyramid showing it's inner chambers and vast tunnel system. That particular view is either from the west looking east, or vice versa. Here it is looking west:



Notice that the entire chamber system runs along a north/south axis...

But how many times have we actually viewed this system from the north or south?

You might think as I did, that there's really not much to see when viewing the cross section from either of these directions, and at first glance this may be true.... but having read this theory I am convinced that there may be something quite amazing happening within this structure....

Here's the view of the chambers from the South (looking North):



From here it appears a little less interesting, just chambers stacked on top of each other... but can you see it?

Here's it is again, but without the pyramid for a moment:





posted on Feb, 26 2009 @ 09:20 PM
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Interesting and I had not heard of it before. I see its been around since 2002. Proton you might want to take this over to Hall of Ma'at they just love new ways to look at the pyramids!.

Good find but I find it a bit hard to visualize them taking all that time to arrange that behind solid rock. It probably lines up to keep the surveying simple.



posted on Feb, 26 2009 @ 09:34 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


Thanks Hans- I was thinking about doing that but thought I'd run it thru here first.

Although I understand what you're saying, there seems to be way too much of a coincidence with the proportions of the human body. It definitely deserves a deeper look...

The one take away from all of this has to be the proportions, as it may shed light on why the pyramid is the size that it is....

Maybe Don B could find some use of the theory...

[edit on 26-2-2009 by PhotonEffect]



posted on Feb, 26 2009 @ 09:58 PM
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reply to post by PhotonEffect
 


Don was one of the guys I was thinking might like it. He likes math. Give it a wirl over there. Jammer, Pistol and cladkill might like it also.



posted on Feb, 26 2009 @ 10:08 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


Sounds like a plan. Not sure how much interest this might get here. I'm hoping to get some more feedback about it...



posted on Feb, 26 2009 @ 10:42 PM
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A couple of other things to take note of:

A possible answer to the riddle of the shafts?...














[edit on 26-2-2009 by PhotonEffect]



posted on Feb, 26 2009 @ 11:23 PM
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Originally posted by PhotonEffect
A couple of other things to take note of:

A possible answer to the riddle of the shafts?...






[edit on 26-2-2009 by PhotonEffect]


Yeah the four ventricles of the heart....cool.

Peace



posted on Feb, 27 2009 @ 12:34 AM
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reply to post by PhotonEffect
 


Yes PhotonEffect, I saw that connection as well with the Djed symbol. A lot think that it is a representation of a backbone.

en.wikipedia.org...

I also think that the proportions are almost certain to be related to the proportions of the human figure, if you have ever heard any talk about Pyramid power, and meditation in pyramids and such. The proportions in a pyramid are supposed to resonate with our bodies, according to these theories.

www.meditationguru.com...

www.project-meditation.org...

www.gizapyramid.com...

The last link looks pretty cool I am reading about it now.





posted on Feb, 27 2009 @ 11:06 AM
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Originally posted by Hanslune
Interesting and I had not heard of it before. I see its been around since 2002. Proton you might want to take this over to Hall of Ma'at they just love new ways to look at the pyramids!.


You are a wicked, wicked man, Hans.

Did you check out the paper on "reading a pyramid" which reviews the relationship of texts inside funerary monuments and pyramids with the overall design and layout of the pyramid? Pretty interesting stuff:
proteus.brown.edu...

As to the "relation of the chambers" to Osiris/etc, I am not convinced there's more to it than coincidence. There are over 100 pyramids and the position of the chambers isn't in the same place on all of them. If there was a connection, it would be seen on each one.



posted on Feb, 27 2009 @ 11:08 AM
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Originally posted by letthereaderunderstand
A possible answer to the riddle of the shafts?...


Actually, the Egyptians were good architects and built many failed pyramids before coming up with the Giza ones. The chambers are to lighten the weight of the pyramid and keep it from collapsing.

There are a number of spaces like those, filled with rubble.



posted on Feb, 27 2009 @ 04:36 PM
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A very interesting find indeed.

The proposal for a new theory is always welcomed among anyone interested in the pyramids. Keep us informed as to what you find.

Cheers.



posted on Feb, 27 2009 @ 04:40 PM
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All the symbolism points to the recurring theme of the ages.

It's all inside of me, you, and all mankind.

When it is said time and time again the truth is within.

Perhaps this is what is being implied throughout most doctrine.

The flaming sword anyone?



posted on Feb, 28 2009 @ 01:59 PM
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Hi Byrd-


Originally posted by Byrd
As to the "relation of the chambers" to Osiris/etc, I am not convinced there's more to it than coincidence.


Why are you dismissing this as coincidence so quickly? Is there something wrong with the evidence presented on the site?


There are over 100 pyramids and the position of the chambers isn't in the same place on all of them. If there was a connection, it would be seen on each one.


This seems a little contradictory to me, but I might be understanding you wrong.... if the position of the chamber systems is different across all 100 or so pyramids then why should there necessarily be a connection between them? I'm not sure why that should even matter.

And since the GP represents the culmination of Egyptian excellence in precision of masonry and architecture then we wouldn't expect any other pyramid to be laid out in the same fashion necessarily.

I think we can all agree that there were things executed in the GP that had never been done before and since...

So to me this theory is still entirely plausible



[edit on 28-2-2009 by PhotonEffect]



posted on Feb, 28 2009 @ 02:14 PM
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great thread
it jumped into my eyes.

all those other pics from pyramids are from the east to the west? (or west to east..)? good idea to look from north to the south


the third pic remember me at a machine (?) I am not shure about it, are you able to turn the pic (i mean the ---->west one).

Its really interesting what this old civilisation built. And i know that they didnt do anything without a knowing.


great thread


Nia



posted on Feb, 28 2009 @ 02:18 PM
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turn and complete it. (in the mind)

then you can see that the downest room and the 1 upper there are like a piece of a puzzle.
the little thing what at pics of the egypt is the penis from the man is one with the room down? *hard to explain for*

and the first room completes the others..





posted on Feb, 28 2009 @ 04:08 PM
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Originally posted by PhotonEffect
Hi Byrd-


Originally posted by Byrd
As to the "relation of the chambers" to Osiris/etc, I am not convinced there's more to it than coincidence.


Why are you dismissing this as coincidence so quickly? Is there something wrong with the evidence presented on the site?


Becuse it uses one pyramid.

Here's the cross section of the Red Pyramid:
www.guardians.net...

The pyramid of Menukare at Giza, next to that of Khufu:
www.guardians.net...

The pyramid of Khafre ... the third one at Giza:
www.guardians.net...

The Bent pyramid:
www.guardians.net...

Amenhat's pyramid:
www.touregypt.net...

(and so on and so forth, with all the minor pyramids ("queens pyramids") that everyone seems to ignore and all the rest.)

If the Djed was a factor, it would show up in the precise proportions and exact same position in almost every pyramid.



And since the GP represents the culmination of Egyptian excellence in precision of masonry and architecture then we wouldn't expect any other pyramid to be laid out in the same fashion necessarily.


It doesn't represent the very finest of Egyptian architecture. It represents the hugest building project they'd done, yes, but architecturally it's surpassed by the temples of Hatshepsut and the temples of Ramesess and possibly the Osirion.


I think we can all agree that there were things executed in the GP that had never been done before and since...


No, I'll stand the contrary argument here. It takes no great feat of engineering to stack up a pyramid. Just time and labor.

Compare that to the Temple of Abu Simbel, with its gigantic monuments and the intricate carvings inside:
witcombe.sbc.edu...

The huge temple built by Hatshepsut at Deir-el-Bahri, with its hundreds of columns supporting roof stones that weighed a ton or more:
www.bediz.com...

(another view of it... consider how vast it is!)
www.touregypt.net...

(just one more... it's a fabulous place: ib205.tripod.com... )

And everything at Abydos.

No, I think they did far better than stack stones into a pyramid (which a four year old could do.) My two personal favorites, in terms of complexity and engineering problems are the Ramses and Hatshepsut temples, with some of the stuff at Abydos sneaking in at third.



posted on Mar, 1 2009 @ 02:27 PM
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remove post.

[edit on 1-3-2009 by PhotonEffect]



posted on Mar, 1 2009 @ 02:29 PM
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reply to post by Byrd
 



Originally posted by Byrd
Becuse it uses one pyramid.

Here's the cross section of the Red Pyramid:
www.guardians.net...

The pyramid of Menukare at Giza, next to that of Khufu:
www.guardians.net...

The pyramid of Khafre ... the third one at Giza:
www.guardians.net...

The Bent pyramid:
www.guardians.net...

Amenhat's pyramid:
www.touregypt.net...

(and so on and so forth, with all the minor pyramids ("queens pyramids") that everyone seems to ignore and all the rest.)

If the Djed was a factor, it would show up in the precise proportions and exact same position in almost every pyramid.


Why must that be the case though Byrd? This is what I'm not understanding. Yes, there are clear connections between many of the pyramids and much of what can be seen in one can be seen, in some variation, in another. But no 2 interiors are exactly alike.

Isn't the GP the only pyramid to have ever used raised chambers? Before and after that one, the "burial chambers" were found below ground were they not? We haven't seen a chamber system that resembles it anywhere else, not even a little.

The GP is the only Egyptian pyramid to use shafts (which of course you know already). Why here and nowhere else? We still have no idea.

Or how about the bent Pyramid with it's 2 entrances (at the north and the west)... this feature is not seen at any of other pyramids either.

I guess what I'm trying to ask is, why should it (i.e the appearance of a djed, or crowned human form) have occurred elsewhere for it to be the case in the GP? IOW, why couldn't they have just been found in the GP and not in any other Egyptian pyramid?


Originally posted by Byrd

Originally posted by PhotonEffect
And since the GP represents the culmination of Egyptian excellence in precision of masonry and architecture then we wouldn't expect any other pyramid to be laid out in the same fashion necessarily.


It doesn't represent the very finest of Egyptian architecture. It represents the hugest building project they'd done, yes, but architecturally it's surpassed by the temples of Hatshepsut and the temples of Ramesess and possibly the Osirion.


I should've been more clear in saying "with regards to their pyramids"...


Response posted by Byrd

Originally posted by PhotonEffect
I think we can all agree that there were things executed in the GP that had never been done before and since...


It takes no great feat of engineering to stack up a pyramid. Just time and labor.


Might be true about some of the much smaller satellite pyramids or the ones which have since crumbled and now lay in ruins. Those might demonstrate what you mean by "no great feat of engineering."

But this shouldn't be said about the GP (or the 2 right next to it). We still haven't figured out how it was constructed. (and yes, of course it took time and lots of labor) Yet there it still stands 500 ft tall, covering 570,000 sqft, all 6 million tons of it, over 4500 years later.

If it's not a product of precise engineering (amongst other things like a keen knowledge of geology and some sort of mathematics and physics) then what would you attribute it to? Blind luck?


Compare that to the Temple of Abu Simbel, with its gigantic monuments and the intricate carvings inside:
witcombe.sbc.edu...

The huge temple built by Hatshepsut at Deir-el-Bahri, with its hundreds of columns supporting roof stones that weighed a ton or more:
www.bediz.com...

(another view of it... consider how vast it is!)
www.touregypt.net...

(just one more... it's a fabulous place: ib205.tripod.com... )
And everything at Abydos..


Yes I would agree, they are very impressive in their own right.


No, I think they did far better than stack stones into a pyramid (which a four year old could do.)


A four year old most certainly could not, with all do respect. And why do we feel the need to downplay such an incredible feat such as the Great Pyramid? I see this alot, especially from those who are considered scholars in the field, and it seems a little irresponsible to me. Honestly, is it based out of an inability to accept the fact that there was an ancient civilization that may've been more intelligent than us?
Check out #5.

[edit on 1-3-2009 by PhotonEffect]



posted on Mar, 1 2009 @ 04:08 PM
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Photon -- Thanks for the theory, neat stuff. I was thinking, they never found human remains in the GP did they? If that's the case and the bodies weren't destroyed by looters maybe the GP was intended to symbolically bury all kings past and present in the form of the guy depicted as the pyramid? The only problem I think with the whole thing is that the form of the man 'buried' in the pyramid wouldn't be readily accessible to people; no one could see it. Maybe it was meant for only kings and priests to know? Either way fun to think about.



posted on Mar, 1 2009 @ 05:01 PM
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Originally posted by PhotonEffect
Why must that be the case though Byrd? This is what I'm not understanding. Yes, there are clear connections between many of the pyramids and much of what can be seen in one can be seen, in some variation, in another. But no 2 interiors are exactly alike.


They're similar, though, and show that some sort of master idea with variations was used throughout time.


Isn't the GP the only pyramid to have ever used raised chambers? Before and after that one, the "burial chambers" were found below ground were they not? We haven't seen a chamber system that resembles it anywhere else, not even a little.


No, Khaferkhaure's does (I think). Disclaimer: I don't have diagrams of the interiors of ALL the 100+ pyramids (including Queen's Pyramids and satellite pyramids.)



I guess what I'm trying to ask is, why should it (i.e the appearance of a djed, or crowned human form) have occurred elsewhere for it to be the case in the GP? IOW, why couldn't they have just been found in the GP and not in any other Egyptian pyramid?


Because they would have referenced it in other ways as well -- particularly in the name of the building. Alas, though, the name of the pyramid (known since before the time of Heroditus) is "Khufu's Ahket" and not "Khufu's Djed." And you see the Djed from only one angle. If it was a Djed, they would have made a correct one... not something resembling a Djed from only one angle (and it wasn't an angle they could view.)


Response posted by Byrd

Originally posted by PhotonEffect
I think we can all agree that there were things executed in the GP that had never been done before and since...


It takes no great feat of engineering to stack up a pyramid. Just time and labor.


Might be true about some of the much smaller satellite pyramids or the ones which have since crumbled and now lay in ruins. Those might demonstrate what you mean by "no great feat of engineering."

But this shouldn't be said about the GP (or the 2 right next to it). We still haven't figured out how it was constructed. (and yes, of course it took time and lots of labor) Yet there it still stands 500 ft tall, covering 570,000 sqft, all 6 million tons of it, over 4500 years later.

If it's not a product of precise engineering (amongst other things like a keen knowledge of geology and some sort of mathematics and physics) then what would you attribute it to? Blind luck?

The good engineering of that time period, plus lots of labor from animals and humans. But it's not supernormal engineering... as you can see if you walk up to it and look at the rough interior. You can easily find the joints between stones and you can slip a piece of paper into some of them. Nice stonework, but on par with what they'd been doing for several hundred years.


No, I think they did far better than stack stones into a pyramid (which a four year old could do.)


A four year old most certainly could not, with all do respect.
I have a 3 year old granddaughter, and she can certainly stack a pyramid with her blocks.



And why do we feel the need to downplay such an incredible feat such as the Great Pyramid? I see this alot, especially from those who are considered scholars in the field, and it seems a little irresponsible to me.


No, it's one of the seven wonders of the ancient world and a well-loved and respected one. But oftentimes it's treated as though it is an impossible feat and that we had all the intelligence and engineering ability of hyperactive chimpanzees. No one bothers to look at the older temples and see how complex Egyptian engineering was long before the pyramids... and everyone tends to think of Giza as the "be all and end all" and ignore the other staggeringly beautiful and complex things that were done elsewhere and elsewhen in Egypt.



Check out #5.


A very nice list from a man who is a fan of many things and who missed many other notable candidates like the Aswan Dam, the Grand Coulee Dam, the Golden Gate Bridge, some of the Gothic Cathedrals and so forth. I wonder what his criteria was.



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