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Masonic Code Phrase?

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posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 03:15 PM
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reply to post by Masonic Light
 


I believe you that the first three degrees are York Rite in nature, but York Rite does not number their degrees, so therefore they would not be 1st, 2nd, 3rd degrees. Also, since Scottish Rite starts their number at 4, it seems they have adopted those first 3 degrees as their own as well. In that case, the first 3 degrees are Universal.

In my experience, York Rite corresponds to Old Testament and Scottish Rite corresponds to New Testament. Therefore it would make sense that the "First" degrees would be York Rite in nature.

Still, no matter how you look at it, there can't be a 3rd degree Scottish Rite can there?




posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 03:21 PM
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Originally posted by getreadyalready


I believe you that the first three degrees are York Rite in nature, but York Rite does not number their degrees, so therefore they would not be 1st, 2nd, 3rd degrees.


Some number the York Rite degrees, whereas others do not. Mackey, for example, numbered them, calling the Royal Arch the Seventh Degree. The first three are almost universally numbered.


Also, since Scottish Rite starts their number at 4, it seems they have adopted those first 3 degrees as their own as well. In that case, the first 3 degrees are Universal.


Yes, but only for those in the US, Canada, and England. Everywhere else, the Scottish Rite works its own first three degrees.


In my experience, York Rite corresponds to Old Testament and Scottish Rite corresponds to New Testament. Therefore it would make sense that the "First" degrees would be York Rite in nature.


The York Rite begins with Apprentice and culminates in the Order of the Temple, and so encompasses both the Old and New Testaments. Both Testaments are also used in the Scottish Rite, as well as writings from other religions.


Still, no matter how you look at it, there can't be a 3rd degree Scottish Rite can there?


Yes, if one were initiated, passed, and raised in one of the District 18 Scottish Rite Lodges in Louisiana. However, the words given in those degrees are completely different than what ministersinister stated, so I would reckon he's a fake.



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 03:33 PM
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Originally posted by getreadyalready
reply to post by Masonic Light
 


So many differing answers? And some from members that are good Masons?

No you didn't miss anything, it sounds like a normal phrase to me. Yes, Mason's do ask "Are you a travelling man?" or "I see you've travelled some?"


I have heard that here, but never in any lodge, or even in any instruction while learning the catechism.


It is not that secret, it just refers to the journey through Masonry that we share as brothers. ( I have also heard people ask, "How old is your Grandmother?"


I hear that one here too. I would know how to answer it, but I am not sure how it would relate to a mason outside of my state.

When did you learn these phrases?



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 03:46 PM
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reply to post by network dude
 


I learned them in casual conversation with older members. When I was new, and didn't know what was ok to ask and what was not. If I suspected someone to be a Mason, I didn't know if it was ok to just out and ask them. Also, I didn't know how to respond if someone asked me if I were a Mason. So I asked some of the older members and they gave me several key phrases that I should recognize. The grip is kind of unreliable, because you don't always get a chance to shake, and no all Mason's use the grip everytime.

I had the same question about another states Lodge numbers. The number wouldn't be helpful at all really, unless you had a Lodge listing and knew their state.

I don't think these things are taught anywhere, they just come from hanging around Lodges and talking with old folks, LOL.

I have had someone at work notice my ring and say, "I see you're a travelling man." It caught me off guard and I didn't know what they were talking about until they lowered their eyes to my ring. Then I responded that I was indeed and said obviously you are too. They said 26 years, and the conversation proceeded from there.



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 04:17 PM
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Nothing personal, but the mason's seem like a club-house for man-boys.

Kinda like the Mickey Mouse club...only sillier and more sinister.

I guess some men need to feel accepted by a group to feel better about themselves.



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 06:02 PM
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reply to post by Romans 10:9
 


fear of the unknown I see. My assurance that nothing sinister goes on behind the Tyler's door won't be enough to convince you, but when you meet someone in the community who you think acts kind and seems to look out for others, check his right hand ring finger. The kind of people who become masons aren't the world domination types, they are the "like to spend time with other good people" types. If that's a crime, I am guilty.



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 06:18 PM
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I think the guy was just telling you that your home is not there in his small town. You probably looked like a freak and those rings didn't help. People turned away from you, and it was only the Mason that would talk to you. He told you to keep moving. Or he was hitting on you.



posted on Apr, 27 2010 @ 09:04 AM
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reply to post by Cabaret Voltaire
 


Awesome! It could be that the rings were not the only thing out of place. If someone is goth looking with those rings, maybe a certain hair style, or eye-liner, etc. Then an older man in a small town would certainly say, "Ye ain't from around here are ya!"


The polite way would be, "You sure are a long way from home?" So, a Mason would likely use the latter phrase instead of the first one.

Or, he was hitting on you!!!



posted on Apr, 27 2010 @ 11:15 AM
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Now do you have the time?



posted on Apr, 27 2010 @ 11:29 AM
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Originally posted by johnathanalexanderpike
Now do you have the time?


Can you explain? I can think of several appropriate situations where that could have a symbolic meaning, but I don't know of any specific common use for it. Can you please elaborate?



posted on Apr, 27 2010 @ 11:35 AM
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Sounds to me not like a masonic phrase, but a colloquial version of another similar phrase used widely here in the deep south: "you ain't from around here, are ya?". Sounds like the locals don't much care for you for whatever reason.



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