Tipu's sword back in Indian hands

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posted on Apr, 8 2004 @ 02:16 AM
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The sword of an 18th century Indian ruler has returned home 200 years after it was taken by the British.
The prize possession of Tipu Sultan, known as the "Tiger of Mysore", was bought at auction last autumn by Indian drinks magnate Vijya Mallya.

Tipu's sword was confiscated after his defeat and death in battle at Seringapatam in 1799.

It was auctioned by the family of Scottish General David Baird, given it for his bravery in toppling the sultan.

story




*above is a portrait of the 18th century national Indian hero and his famous sword*

here are some more links about the Tiger of Mysore..

gallery

guided tour

background info

enjoy




posted on Apr, 8 2004 @ 02:41 AM
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Wow, how nice would that be to add to your collection? $350,000 is quite a chunk of change for a sword.
I wonder how many heads were seperated from their boddies by that sword?
Interesting article Gryff



posted on Apr, 8 2004 @ 02:51 AM
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Its good that the sword is back in Indian hands, but I think the true owner should be the descendent of the Tiger himself, rather than some Corporate git.



posted on Apr, 9 2004 @ 03:57 PM
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One down, thousands to go.



posted on Apr, 9 2004 @ 04:00 PM
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lol, Surf


Hey, hows about those Crown Jewels ?

Deep



posted on Apr, 9 2004 @ 04:01 PM
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I agree with Pisky, it should be given to the descendent.

Swords are powerful symbols especially in the Indian culture.

I have a few swords and they mean a lot to me. But I'm a freak.

Glad it's almost back where it belongs.

Spiderj



posted on Apr, 9 2004 @ 07:11 PM
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lol, Surf

Hey, hows about those Crown Jewels ?
Deep


I don't think anyone else got that. "Kuhinoor"



posted on Apr, 9 2004 @ 07:14 PM
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I agree with Pisky, it should be given to the descendent.


British royalty won't like be very happy of stripping them of all their valuable "supposedly earned" jewels.

[Edited on 4/9/2004 by surfup]



posted on Apr, 9 2004 @ 07:22 PM
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Originally posted by surfup
One down, thousands to go.


lol...at least it is in an Indian's hand now....it could have been bought by American...thankfully Bill Gates isn't into sword play.

great find and links included gryff
there is more to this story than just an artifact returning to India, the sword and it's original owner are symbols of Indian pride and resistance to British imperialism. It will definitely be used as a prop in upcoming elections to insight Indian patriotism.



posted on Apr, 9 2004 @ 07:25 PM
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[Edited on 4/10/2004 by surfup]



posted on Apr, 10 2004 @ 12:20 PM
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It's quite a symbolic move at first glance, but Pisky's right, when you look a bit deeper it's a bit sad that the sword has been demoted to a toy for a corporate fat cat to buy popularity with. I felt his comment that "no one had the right to possess it except for Indians" was especially hypocritical, as it didn't belong to India, it belonged to Tipu. If he really cared about the sword he would be giving it to the closest descendant as a gift.

Very nice sword though, can see why it was confiscated.

Maybe this'll inspire the British museum to give back the Elgin Marbles.





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