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Once thought safe, WPA Wi-Fi encryption is cracked

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posted on Nov, 6 2008 @ 11:50 AM
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November 6, 2008, 10:23 AM — IDG News Service —

Security researchers say they've developed a way to partially crack the Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA) encryption standard used to protect data on many wireless networks.

Source: www.itworld.com... wi-fi-encryption-cracked


Everyone knows that WEP is an extremely vulnerable encryption method, but now it looks like WPA isn't that safe any more either.

Mod Edit: External Source Tags – Please Review This Link.

[edit on 6/11/2008 by Mirthful Me]




posted on Nov, 6 2008 @ 02:19 PM
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Anything that comes out in the market at any time with encryption / protection is already light years behind the equipment security/ upper law enforcement has already had a while. I say that with all due respect. When the tech is being developed, so is the back door.



posted on Nov, 6 2008 @ 03:14 PM
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reply to post by Atlantican
 


I have to disagree. Seriously. One-time pads are still perfectly secure, and there is no such thing as a back door for one-time pads..



posted on Nov, 6 2008 @ 04:54 PM
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reply to post by Atlantican
 


I agree. Security didn't become an issue until it was breached. Fraud protection wasn't available until identity theft became so prevailant and even today it's SO easy to commit fraud, especially online.

I have a degree in computer related crime investigation and work as an ECommerce Manager for an online store. We spend a lot of man-hours trying to keep up with the countless hackers all over the world who steal our products. At this point our only defense is making sure they can't access customer credit card information, which is easy to do because we don't retain that information. It's an inconvenience to customers but a lot better than being responsible for theft.



posted on Nov, 7 2008 @ 12:00 PM
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After some more research, its a let down. They've only exploited the TKIP wrappers not the underlying key. And if you're using AES, you're still safe.

arstechnica.com...




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