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India's Chandrayaan Blasts Off To The Moon!

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posted on Nov, 29 2008 @ 01:09 AM
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Originally posted by zorgon
FARSIDE of the moon...



What's with the colors? Are they natural? Nope! Then why these particular shades?


Cheers!




posted on Nov, 29 2008 @ 03:30 AM
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Originally posted by mikesingh
What's with the colors? Are they natural? Nope!


Sigh.... ArMaP will be 'upset' if I flog the color horse again


But the image is in UV-VIS... It uses light in the visible and adjacent near ultraviolet (UV) and near infrared (NIR) ranges.

In other words it adds a little at either end of the visible spectrum for enhancement... so it is close to real color



posted on Nov, 29 2008 @ 05:49 AM
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reply to post by zorgon
 


But the Japanese sat which is Hi Def, produces black/white? Or a sickening gray? Not a hint of color in the vis spectrum!

Oh darn, never mind!



posted on Nov, 29 2008 @ 07:19 AM
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reply to post by zorgon
 


Do you have the location for that photo? If you have I could try to see what I can get with ISIS 3, now that I have it working.



posted on Nov, 29 2008 @ 10:38 AM
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reply to post by mikesingh
 



The Clementine 'natural' color composite mosaic (5 UVVIS bands available) is presented here for browsing by utilizing three of the five UVVIS multispectral bands, combined in red, green and blue channels of a color image (see table below). (Note: The composite image is not truly "natural color," but mimics natural color to the human eye.)

www.mapaplanet.org...

The "natural color" Clementine images are not true color. They do not even use visible bands. They use red and green for two of the near infrared bands and blue for the ultraviolet. That's it. Three colors representing wavelengths humans can't see (OK, the 415nm band is at the very end of the visible spectrum). It's pretty, and pretty weird looking sometimes, but it has nothing to do with the way the moon appears to our eyes.

[edit on 11/29/2008 by Phage]



posted on Nov, 30 2008 @ 01:23 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Thanks Phage!
But the question is why hasn't Jaxa given us some natural color images of the Moon with their Hi-Def gizmo?

Probably the Moon IS almost black and white! (But that isn't true either!!) This is its natural color:


Telescope used: 8" f/6 Meade newtonian telescope.
Courtesy: Abrams Planetarium, Michigan State University


Also the image sent by the MIP shows the Moon brownish in color. So what's going on here?? Or can the Japanese probe's HD cam only beam black and white images unlike the MIP?

Cheers!



posted on Nov, 30 2008 @ 02:43 AM
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reply to post by mikesingh
 


Kaguya has sent true color images, or pretty close to it. The oceans of Earth are blue, the clouds are white, and the moon is mostly a dirty gray.
wms.selene.jaxa.jp...

I don't know what color bands the MIP was shooting, the color is "odd" but consistent throughout the images.

I'm sure you've looked at the moon with a pretty good 'scope. What color did it appear to you? That is natural color. What your eye sees is natural color. Not what any camera sees.

We know that there are very subtle color variations on the moon but there is also a layer of moondust that covers most everything. Don't expect to see the Painted Desert, it ain't like that.

Yeah, I know, there are a few Apollo images that show brown. But there are far more that show gray. Remember when we had to wait for photos to be ready at the drugstore? Remember how some of them came out funny looking? Anomaly doesn't always mean what most people on ATS seem to think it means.

Here's what color on the moon means:
www.hq.nasa.gov...

[edit on 11/30/2008 by Phage]



posted on Nov, 30 2008 @ 02:55 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
combined in red, green and blue channels of a color image (see table below). (Note: The composite image is not truly "natural color," but mimics natural color to the human eye.)





The primary colors of light are red, green, and blue.

Red, green, and blue are the primary colors of light. Mixing these colors can produce all of the colors of the spectrum.

Grade 4 Tooter
www.tooter4kids.com...



posted on Nov, 30 2008 @ 03:02 AM
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reply to post by zorgon
 


Yes.
If the image originally included those colors. Clementine did not.
The images we get arbitrarily assigned the 1000nm band (invisible) to red, the 900nm band (invisible) to green, and the 415nm band (barely visible) to blue.

You can retrieve the data for each band yourself and assign it to those colors to obtain the same results. Or you can pick other colors and it will look completely different. But you cannot make it look like it would look to the human eye because most of the data obtained by Clementine is not visible to the human eye.

[edit on 11/30/2008 by Phage]



posted on Nov, 30 2008 @ 03:03 AM
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Originally posted by PhageThe oceans of Earth are blue, the clouds are white, and the moon is mostly a dirty gray.


Well you must be right of course... your so smart... even your friends at USGS agree






posted on Nov, 30 2008 @ 03:06 AM
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reply to post by zorgon
 


I was referring to the digital Kaguya image. Not the scanned Apollo images.



posted on Nov, 30 2008 @ 03:08 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
I was referring to the digital Kaguya image. Not the scanned Apollo images.



Actually that USGS picture is from Clementine... sorry

And Kaguya pasted a color Earth into the back ground of a clay model moon. When I have time I will post the shadow proof





...---...

[edit on 30-11-2008 by zorgon]



posted on Nov, 30 2008 @ 03:14 AM
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Originally posted by zorgon

Actually that USGS picture is from Clementine... sorry

And Kaguya pasted a color Earth into the back ground of a clay model moon. When I have time I will post the shadow proof
[edit on 30-11-2008 by zorgon]


No need to apologize. My goof thinking it was from Apollo. As I said, the colorization of the Clementine images is false.

I'll be interested to see your proof that the Kaguya HD video is faked.

Here's another version of that image (with this caption):

Clementine colorized image showing the full Earth over the Moon's north pole.

nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov...

[edit on 11/30/2008 by Phage]



posted on Nov, 30 2008 @ 06:32 AM
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Originally posted by mikesinghBut the question is why hasn't Jaxa given us some natural color images of the Moon with their Hi-Def gizmo?
One thing we must remember about the high-definition images from Kaguya is that the camera is a video camera, with all the limitations video cameras have when compared with photo cameras.

One of the things I have noticed on those high-definition images is that the colour is strongly affected by the light levels, low light levels give a greenish-brownish hue to the images while high light levels give a neutral grey.


Or can the Japanese probe's HD cam only beam black and white images unlike the MIP?
The images are not black and white, as you can see in the image bellow.


And you can also see that there is some colour variation in that image.

But maybe an Indian brownish is more acceptable than a Japanese brownish...


Edit: click the image for full size.


[edit on 30/11/2008 by ArMaP]



posted on Nov, 30 2008 @ 11:23 AM
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A sudden spark. What if these terror attacks in Mumbai are warning from the neo-nazi elites to India, not to go further deep down the rabbit hole? Not to publish a brownish image of moon and all the truth behind (Hoagland's glass structures and Lear's soul catcher tower
)

Anyway, the attacks did help deviating what ISRO is doing and their publications.

Think about it, the attacks and the developing post attack scenarios are definitely not good for India. If that is the case, oh my


Sorry can't resist. Conspiracy eating my aging neurons


[edit on 30/11/08 by CosmicScorpion]



posted on Nov, 30 2008 @ 02:51 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


I finally found the area from which that image came (it shows the southern half of Thomson crater), and I think that it looks a little better by making the Red, Green and Blue channels use the 900nm, 750nm and 415nm, but that is subjective and still uses (and there is other way with these images) some "invisible" data.

(Click the image for the full size version)


PS: the above image was made with two different images, so it's possible (and even likely) that the join is not correct, I have not yet found a way of making mosaics with ISIS 3.



posted on Nov, 30 2008 @ 05:54 PM
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Sorry I didn't get back with you on the location, but seems you did alright.

Its to bad the original USGS took away the original image creator. You could order up a big area online...

This is Mare Marginis, the other big magnetic anomaly region directly opposite Reiner Gamma on the near side. It's interesting ow both areas show those swirls

Here is a field drawing for Reiner Gamma... Weird but I was sure I had all this on a page already but seems its gone. I think maybe I posted it in the old thread but never saved a copy..




Now I have to dig it up all over again


[edit on 30-11-2008 by zorgon]



posted on Nov, 30 2008 @ 11:16 PM
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Originally posted by zorgon
This is Mare Marginis, the other big magnetic anomaly region directly opposite Reiner Gamma on the near side. It's interesting ow both areas show those swirls

Mare Marginis is not "directly opposite" Reiner Gamma.

The only major feature near the antipode of Mare Marginis (13.3° N, 86.1° E) is Mare Orientale. Mare Orientale is at 19.4° S, 92.8° W. Reiner Gamma is at 7.5° N 59.0° W. A fur piece away from the antipodal coordinates of Mare Margninis.

There is no magnetic anomaly at the antipodal region of Reiner Gamma.

[edit on 11/30/2008 by Phage]



posted on Dec, 1 2008 @ 02:30 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
There is no magnetic anomaly at the antipodal region of Reiner Gamma.


Where DO you get you info


Would seem Harvard disagrees with you

A Cometary Origin of Reiner-Gamma Magnetic Anomalies
Authors; Srnka, L. J.; Schultz, P. H.
Publication:LUNAR AND PLANETARY SCIENCE XI, P. 1076-1078. Abstract.

adsabs.harvard.edu...

LUNAR SWIRLS, MAGNETIC ANOMALIES, AND THE REINER GAMMA FORMATION
by Marvin W. Huddleston
www.sunflower-astronomy.com...

Reiner Gamma is the most famous swirl known, and has an area of 10,000 km^2 and a strong magnetic anomaly (Hughes and others, 2006)
the-moon.wikispaces.com...

NASA also disagrees with you


Abstract. The highly magnetic (field magnitudes of 50
nT at 18 km altitude) Reiner Gamma albedo feature on
the near side of the moon has been explained in terms of
differential space weathering of an old feature, or a recent
cometary impact.

denali.gsfc.nasa.gov...

Well you believe in Faeries so your not all bad...

But at least you made me dig it up again




...---...

[edit on 1-12-2008 by zorgon]



posted on Dec, 1 2008 @ 06:14 AM
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reply to post by zorgon
 


I may be wrong (I did not read all those texts) but I did not saw anywhere that there is a magnetic anomaly at the antipodal region of Reiner Gamma, only "roughly" at the antipodal region.



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