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NASA acknowledgement of Phoenix `growths`

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posted on Sep, 10 2008 @ 08:39 PM
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I posted this originally in the Space forum,but seeing the amount of Mars related posts here,i did not see a problem.Hopefully it will interest someone.


This has been known about for several weeks,but NASA have now officially acknowledged it.

While the scientists try to figure out what the `growths` are (possibly frost deposits)take a look for yourselves and see what you think.


www.redorbit.com...
www.redorbit.com...


www.jpl.nasa.gov...
www.jpl.nasa.gov...


www.physorg.com...
www.physorg.com...


The thread below is maybe/maybe not related to this news.

thread HERE



[edit on 10-9-2008 by Swamp Gas]




posted on Sep, 10 2008 @ 08:50 PM
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That is definitely some type of growth... that's wild, I wonder if it's some kind of "alien" fungus or just frost...



posted on Sep, 10 2008 @ 08:57 PM
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they look like barnacles to me.



posted on Sep, 10 2008 @ 08:59 PM
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Wouldnt frost prove the atmosphere contains water? there fore capable of sustaining life am i missing something?



posted on Sep, 10 2008 @ 09:17 PM
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reply to post by dragonridr
 


The `frost` would have probably arisen from contact with the ground upon landing.

The thrusters may have briefly melted some ice in the mud when touching down,this would have created a `slop`,some of which may have been splashed onto part of Phoenix,then quickly refroze.

There is only trace amounts of water vapor in the Martian atmosphere (0.03%),and atmospheric pressure is far too low to allow water to exist as a liquid on the surface,or as moisture droplets in the air (the clouds are ice crystals).
Temperature also plays a big part away from equatorial latitudes.
Instead it is either ice,or water vapor which sublimes from solid into vapor(or vice versa),bypassing liquid state entirely (there is some evidence to support the hypothesis that liquid water can exist briefly,as a flow)

Also,water is not the only prerequisite for life,there are many,many more factors involved.



[edit on 10-9-2008 by Swamp Gas]



posted on Sep, 10 2008 @ 09:18 PM
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Looks like frost that builds up on my car in the early morning.
So either moisture in the atmosphere or salt crystals.
If it was melted water from the landing wouldn't it have frozen almost immediately after touchdown?



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