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An amusing error in geography

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posted on Sep, 4 2008 @ 04:06 PM
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The ATS thread




Roman settlement uncovered in US



The original article

I'm sure somewhere someone will latch onto this as proof of pre-Norse cross Atlantic crossings


[edit on 4/9/08 by Hanslune]




posted on Sep, 5 2008 @ 02:44 AM
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I find interesting the Egyptian evidence in Australia. People have also long spoken of a long passed Egyptian presence in the states, in the Grand Canyon.
The later may well be a myth but there is no mistaking the hieroglyphs in Aus among a few artifacts.



posted on Sep, 5 2008 @ 11:34 AM
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Originally posted by Good Wolf
I find interesting the Egyptian evidence in Australia. People have also long spoken of a long passed Egyptian presence in the states, in the Grand Canyon.

Both are hooey.


Originally posted by Good Wolf
The later may well be a myth but there is no mistaking the hieroglyphs in Aus among a few artifacts.

Apparently, there is, as you are doing said mistaking.

Harte



posted on Sep, 5 2008 @ 11:39 AM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


It's obviously proof that ancient hybrid Nephilim moved Cleveland to the British Isles in a fit of rage at being rained on. They took everything but the plumbing, which also answers the question of the smell.



posted on Sep, 5 2008 @ 11:44 AM
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Yes it was, "a conspiracy by the native americans to name everything in US after stuff in the Europe".

I was actually told that once on another board by a raving looney - while discussing why places names like Cairo and Damascus didn't mean Muslims had gotten to North America before Columbus.....



posted on Sep, 5 2008 @ 12:17 PM
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Originally posted by HarteBoth are hooey.


They are? Well that's disappointing. I figured the states one would've been, but the aus one had a lot of local lore and legends surrounding it.

Where is your debunking info at?



posted on Sep, 5 2008 @ 12:39 PM
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reply to post by Good Wolf
 


I'll let Harte answer those two but I will add one note. The Grand Canyon one is crispy and crusty with fringe.



posted on Sep, 5 2008 @ 12:56 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


Huh?



posted on Sep, 5 2008 @ 01:17 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


The OP fixed the link to state it is the UK. I know I am not tje only one who thinks it is possible for the Romans to have traveled to the Western Hemisphere. The Egyptians did it as evidenced in the traces of tobacco found in some mummies and Thor Heyerdahl sailed across the Atlantic in a papyrus boat.

[edit on 9/5/2008 by kidflash2008]



posted on Sep, 5 2008 @ 03:53 PM
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reply to post by kidflash2008
 


Howdy Kidflash

They found compounds that tobacco has along with a number of other plants in the world, to include Egypt.

Good old Thor barely made it to the carribean and despite his bravado - and he didn't dare try to go back. There are threads on this forum about this so I don't want to redue. Basically do a mind problem. Figure out what would be needed to do a trade route to Egypt to the Americas for coc aine and tobacco.



posted on Sep, 5 2008 @ 04:22 PM
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Long time lurker first time poster......

I remember reading an article a few years ago in American History magazine about the theory (and apparently some evidence, although I do not remember exactly what it was) that Romans and even a few people before them must have traveled here to get copper during the Bronze Age. Apparently there was never enough copper over there to explain how they were able to use so much of it.



posted on Sep, 5 2008 @ 04:36 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


That's hilarious.
It sort of reminds me of a story a cousin once told me, about a university Art History class. The name of the course was "Paleochristian art". And when the professor started showing Paleochristian objects and symbols from the 4th or 5th century, after a while one of the students interrupted the professor and asked her whether she was talking about the B.C. or A.D. era...
That student was one confused lady.







[edit on 5-9-2008 by AdAstra]



posted on Sep, 5 2008 @ 11:14 PM
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What do you guys make of this?

www.econ.ohio-state.edu...



posted on Sep, 5 2008 @ 11:59 PM
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It's hard to know what to make of the many coin finds made. Most taken up out of context. No pottery, bones, habitations or tools just easily transportable coins.

Corliss has a lot of information on this.



posted on Sep, 6 2008 @ 01:26 AM
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Fair enough.

My last item is this.

The 9,400 y/o north American mummy.

With some more info here.


Tis an amazing scientific discovery.



posted on Sep, 6 2008 @ 10:15 AM
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The latest trend is pushing the peopling (is that a word?) of the Americas back to the 15,000 years ago. It may go further as the search continues.

It would be interesting if Homo Erectus got here first but the signs of them are very limited and open to debate.

I suspect we'll get humans in the Americas back to around 30-40,000 years in the next decades.



posted on Sep, 6 2008 @ 10:44 AM
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Originally posted by Good Wolf
Fair enough.

My last item is this.
The 9,400 y/o north American mummy.


The oldest mummy, yes, but not the oldest traces of paleoIndians in the American continent. The Clovis culture is dated to about 10,000 BC... although there aren't any mummies there are other artifacts from that culture -- arrowhead and so forth.

There is a site in South America that's dated to around 20,000 BC (dating controversial but becoming less controversial) and sites here in Texas and the Carolinas that are about 15,000 years old.

There are some websites out there that preach on and on and on about "what scientists think" by people who don't know any scientists and never bothered to search for archaeological news.

The coins are interesting. Old coins were often used as "luck pieces" and carried by people. I have been coin collecting on and off since the 1950's, and it's always been easy to get old foreign coins (you could buy them by the pound) -- my husband has a coin dated to about 100 BC. If you found my husband's coin, it wouldn't be proof that there was a Roman expedition to Texas in 50 BC:
imperator-coinsandantiquities.com...

As Hans says, unless they're found with a burial (which they often are in Europe) and other things clearly dated to that era, they probably are simply lost coins from someone who came here from Europe in relatively modern times.



posted on Sep, 6 2008 @ 10:49 AM
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Originally posted by Good Wolf

Originally posted by HarteBoth are hooey.


They are? Well that's disappointing. I figured the states one would've been, but the aus one had a lot of local lore and legends surrounding it.

Where is your debunking info at?


A number of threads in this very forum (do a search on"hieroglyphs" and "Australia" on ATS.) I'm afraid that the "local lore and legends" didn't exist before 1984... when park rangers at Gosford caught a man (about age 50) carving the "Egyptian-looking" graffiti into the rock.

After that, people who didn't know what hieroglyphics look like added to the site and often (I think) went back to tell people about the "amazing Egytpian hieroglyphics which say...."

(and of course they say no such thing because the people who wrote them didn't know how to read or write ancient Egyptian.)



posted on Sep, 6 2008 @ 10:55 AM
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There are some websites out there that preach on and on and on about "what scientists think" by people who don't know any scientists and never bothered to search for archaeological news.


They (such writers) should just read the literature or hang out at sites like Hall of Ma'at. Of course it makes fringe believers feel better if they can make believe their opponents in the discussion are intellectual Neanderthals (in the 19th century version of the word) and knowledge Luddities.

The truth is very different.

Got an email last week from an old friend who was lamenting her poor publication record. She finished with, "after twenty-two seasons why the H---- can't I find anything history making!"



posted on Sep, 6 2008 @ 11:46 PM
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reply to post by Byrd
 


Ah sou desu neh.

(japanese for "Ah I see now")






Well is there anything out there that you guys know of that gives credence to the idea of diffusion?
I'd be interested in seeing it.

[edit on 9/6/2008 by Good Wolf]




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