Is McCain Showing Symptoms of PTSD?

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posted on Sep, 2 2008 @ 12:39 PM
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It certainly is good that even these elitist bastards, who see themselves as gods and invincible, still must take a bow and surrender to the harsh realities of life and how the body and mind work.

Money can't buy you everything, my friend.

My grandfather suffered from PTSD. He fought in World War II and was captured by Nazis. He was held at Stalag 17 and wounded during his escape.

So I sympathize with the John McCain that was captured and tortured.

I don't sympathize with the John McCain that chose to be a lifeless war monger puppet for his elitist masters. In my mind, he's getting what he deserves.




posted on Sep, 2 2008 @ 01:01 PM
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Originally posted by jam321
Please show me the documentation that you are medically certified to diagnose individuals with PTSD.



Did I say I have diagnosed McCain with PTSD and he will now have to undergo treatment?

Did you not even finish reading the opening post?

Obviously you didn't before you started flaming, so I'll quote my words at the end of the post!


Originally posted by Keyhole

I'm not a doctor, but it sure seems like he exhibits a lot of the symptoms of PTSD.



This is only an observation.

[edit on 9/2/2008 by Keyhole]



posted on Sep, 4 2008 @ 02:33 PM
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Originally posted by hypervigilant
P.T.S.D. is a normal reaction to an abnormally traumatic event,situation or multiple events, and, or, situations. I doubt that he has the high degree of symptoms that a real combatant does. He spent something like 23 to 24 hours maximum in the air dropping bombs on civilian targets in North Vietnam.While for the ground combatants in infantry units were in the thick of it that many hour at a time or longer in a day in South Vietnam.



According to studies in my OP, it is more likely for POW's to end up with PTSD than combat soldiers.

That's there opinion anyway.

John McCain's Suicide Attempt and His Resulting PTSD


An outcome of PTSD is a subtle web of personal problems including difficulty in controlling intense emotions such as anger and an inability to function well under stress.

Psychologist Patricia B. Sutker of the New Orleans Veterans Administration Medical Center and her colleagues reported in a 1991 issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry that as many as nine of 10 surviving U.S. servicemen taken captive during the Korean War may suffer from PTSD and other mental disorders more than 35 years after their release.

In a follow-up study, VA experts concluded that POWs suffer "a much greater risk of developing PTSD than combat veterans."

Robert Timberg, in his book, The Nightingale's Song, wrote that POW McCain "suffered terribly in North Vietnamese camps."






 
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