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The Bermuda Triangle

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posted on Jul, 18 2008 @ 03:41 AM
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The Bermuda Triangle




The Bermuda Triangle, also known as the Devil's Triangle, is a region of the northwestern Atlantic Ocean in which a number of aircraft and surface vessels have disappeared. Some people have claimed that these disappearances fall beyond the boundaries of human error or acts of nature. Popular culture has attributed some of these disappearances to the paranormal, a suspension of the laws of physics, or activity by extraterrestrial beings.[1] Though a substantial documentation exists showing numerous incidents to have been inaccurately reported or embellished by later authors, and numerous official agencies have gone on record as stating the number and nature of disappearances to be similar to any other area of ocean, many have remained unexplained despite considerable investigation.[
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posted on Jul, 18 2008 @ 03:41 AM
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The boundaries of the Triangle vary with the author; some stating its shape is akin to a trapezoid covering the Straits of Florida, the Bahamas, and the entire Caribbean island area east to the Azores; others add to it the Gulf of Mexico. The more familiar, triangular boundary in most written works has as its points somewhere on the Atlantic coast of Florida; San Juan, Puerto Rico; and the mid-Atlantic island of Bermuda, with most of the accidents concentrated along the southern boundary around the Bahamas and the Florida Straits.


The area of the Triangle varies by author.The area is one of the most heavily-sailed shipping lanes in the world, with ships crossing through it daily for ports in the Americas, Europe, and the Caribbean Islands. Cruise ships are also plentiful, and pleasure craft regularly go back and forth between Florida and the islands. It is also a heavily flown route for commercial and private aircraft heading towards Florida, the Caribbean, and South America from points north.

The Gulf Stream ocean current flows through the Triangle after leaving the Gulf of Mexico; its current of five to six knots may have played a part in a number of disappearances. Sudden storms can and do appear, and in the summer to late fall hurricanes strike the area. The combination of heavy maritime traffic and tempestuous weather makes it inevitable that vessels could founder in storms and be lost without a trace – especially before improved telecommunications, radar, and satellite technology arrived late in the 20th century.



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posted on Jul, 18 2008 @ 03:45 AM
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Sorry but how is this breaking news? dont like to do this but



posted on Jul, 18 2008 @ 03:48 AM
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I'm pretty sure that most ATS members are aware of the Bermuda Triangle.

I'm afraid I don't get what your point with this post is.

If you want more on this - read some Charles Berlitz.



posted on Jul, 18 2008 @ 04:00 AM
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I know. I just felt like putting it on cuz Igot bored



posted on Jul, 18 2008 @ 04:00 AM
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WE have a bunch load of topics on this, If its something you are interested in have a search on the forums, there is a number of very interesting threads on this very topic,

l ink to threads



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