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The russian constitution

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posted on Jul, 8 2008 @ 04:58 AM
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I thought to look up the Russian constitution to compare it to our own in this day and age to see what the differences truly are. After reading the first artical which simply defines how the Russian federation shall identify itself I came across article two


"Man, his rights and freedoms shall be the supreme value. It shall be a duty of the state to recognize, respect and protect the rights and liberties of man and citizen"

And this got me to thinking. Although I abhor socialism for a variety of common sense reasons, I really admire the second artical of their constitution. Specifically the second sentence. It shall be the DUTY OF THE STATE TO recognize, respect and protect the rights and liberties of man and citizen

I do not see that in my US/USCC constitution.

Of course My constitution seems to be null and void these days. So for educational purposes I thought I would present the "other guys" constitution and ask for your opinion as to how well you think theirs' stacks up against ours?




posted on Jul, 8 2008 @ 05:48 AM
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There was a part in there that I thought might go against Article 2 that you quoted...


[quote=Article 13 Item 5]
The establishment and the activities of public associations, whose aims and actions are directed at forcible alteration of the fundamentals of constitutional governance and violation of the integrity of the Russian Federation and undermining of the security of the state, the forming of armed units, the incitement of social, racial, national and religious strife shall be prohibited.


This could be interpreted as against any freedom of assembly like we have in ours.

The main thingI can see right away, is that our Constitution was written using the language of the times, and so is theirs. The difference being, theirs seems to be less likely a need for "interpretation."

At least this is how I see it anyway.



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