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Withstand (questions)

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posted on Apr, 17 2008 @ 05:04 PM
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Can a life in some form withstand a temerature of the degree of the sun's core? Was there life before the big bang? As all things that were before the big bang entered into extreme heat long ago, how did it come even possible that there is life now today if everything was so heated? Can life be produced from things that have been super heated by say the temp of the core of the sun?

Is extreme heat escapeable depending on the size of a living thing? What's the smallest living thing known to man?




posted on Apr, 17 2008 @ 05:11 PM
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I think it is hard to answer your question untill we actually find life that can live in such extreme temps. But then again, we may think the sun is really hot, but on a larger scale, it could be nothing compared to something undiscovered.
I think bacteria is pretty small.



posted on Apr, 17 2008 @ 09:39 PM
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Originally posted by Mabus
Can a life in some form withstand a temerature of the degree of the sun's core? Was there life before the big bang? As all things that were before the big bang entered into extreme heat long ago, how did it come even possible that there is life now today if everything was so heated? Can life be produced from things that have been super heated by say the temp of the core of the sun?

Is extreme heat escapeable depending on the size of a living thing? What's the smallest living thing known to man?


No life based on molecules could exist in temperatures near that of the sun's core. I can't imagine anything that you could call alive that isn't made of molecules. Barring some freaky, star trek-esque energy being thing, I'm inclined to say no. If there's life in there, it's certainly not life as we know it.

As far as science knows, the big bang is an expansion of space and time, and it occurred at the beginning of space time, so there was no "before" the big bang. It was the functional start of time. As far as we know, all events happen in space time, so there's no known way for anything to be alive before it, having no space to exist in, and no time to live during. Since then, space has expanded and time has passed, so the density of the universe is what it is today. There's a whole lot of noting with a spattering of stars, grouped together by gravity, and those groups are apparently accelerated apart ever faster by dark energy, who's effect is the opposite of other forces like gravity, in that it is exclusively repulsive, and increases in strength with distance.

All life that we know is produced from stuff that was once part of stars, and consequently, superheated at some point. All the elements heavier than hydrogen were produced in stars, and furthermore, all the naturally occurring elements heavier than iron were created during supernova events (or are decay products of elements produced by such events). It follows that all life is mainly made of the detritus of destroyed stars.

Barring viruses, which I personally don't consider alive, the smallest forms of life is probably the bacteria Nanoarchaeum, but there are other things yet smaller that aren't viruses, but are still only questionably alive, such as the nanobes and nanobacteria. I honestly don't know if those are alive.



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