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Aikido - The Path Beyond Thought

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posted on Jan, 29 2008 @ 08:01 AM
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www.stage6.com...

About a Great Man




posted on Jan, 29 2008 @ 09:24 AM
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reply to post by E†E
 


Hi E†E,
I'm not sure of the point of the post. Has something happened to Steven Segal?

I have studied Aikido and other martial arts over the years, and while I haven't trained with Steven Segal, I have friends who have. My impression has been that there are a number of dedicated Shihan deserving of praise, some that I've trained with who seem much more humble in a positive way. Since I haven't personally met him, I realize my opinions are only based on his public interviews and statements.

The best masters (shihan) I've trained with include Aoyagi Sensei from Honolulu, Bookman Sensei from Seattle, Saito Sensei from Iwama Dojo in Japan, Saotome Sensei from Japan, and Ikeda Sensei from Colorado.

Out of those, my favorites, and also the most open teachers I've ever had the honor to train with have been Aoyagi Sensei and Bookman Sensei, both incredibly memorable experiences.

I've trained with other instructors in Hawaii and Seattle, but both Aoyagi Sensei's and Bookman Sensei's training had authenticity that you never had to question. Where I felt that some instructors (not those on my list) feel they must prove the value of their techniques, with both of those masters, you simply realize very quickly that they are pushing you to your limits, which are very different from theirs. Another similar thing about them both is their humble approach and willingness to explain the why of particular techniques, something often missing from other instructors, especially those in the lower black belt ranks.

So, back to the question, while I agree that Aikido can bring a lot of positives to the world, is there another point to the post specifically regarding Steven Segal? Thanks.


Ox

posted on Jan, 29 2008 @ 10:04 AM
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I've studied Aikido for 23 of my 30 years. Although I've never have the honour or pleasure of meeting Take Sensi I am familiar with his teachings and philosophy. Yes he's a great man with great ability. A very gentle man.. who can also be very lethal if he wanted to be. Thankfully the teachings of Aikido promote path of least resistance.

I'm still a little confused by the initial posting of this thread though



posted on Jan, 29 2008 @ 10:39 AM
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reply to post by lifestudent
 


I had the chance to see this and thought to share it, thats all.
I was very impressed by the 'spirit' of this man. The fighting is but expression of who he is.

I see a lesson behind his living.. not so much his fighting style..though it is his best 'method' of expression.

night for now..
will talk more later.



posted on Jan, 29 2008 @ 10:41 AM
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reply to post by Ox
 


Just thought to share it.

night


Ox

posted on Jan, 29 2008 @ 12:19 PM
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Aikido isnt just a training.. it's a way of life, anyone who takes their Aikido "training" seriously also lives their life in the same fashion that Take Sensei would. That being "Try to find the path of least resistance and use it without harming others. Live with intregrity and morality, not only with people but with all beings"



posted on Jan, 29 2008 @ 03:38 PM
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Originally posted by Ox
Aikido isnt just a training.. it's a way of life, anyone who takes their Aikido "training" seriously also lives their life in the same fashion that Take Sensei would. That being "Try to find the path of least resistance and use it without harming others. Live with intregrity and morality, not only with people but with all beings"


Hi Ox,
I guess I'd agree that the general philosophy inspires that approach to life, but I have met very few people who would claim to have reached that point.

In my experience, most advanced aikidoka are more peaceful than the average person, usually the more advanced they are, the more so it seems, but not always. At the same time, I believe even serious practitioners still struggle with the issues and weaknesses that make us all human, including a difference between how we would want to live our lives and how we actually do. Would you agree?


Ox

posted on Jan, 30 2008 @ 09:27 AM
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lifestudent.

I do agree to what you say.. Yes.. However, there are always going to be struggles most out of your control.. or our control. I can tell you through the 23 years of my studying I haven't yet reached what I am looking for, while I try to maintain a peaceful life with morality, there are times that I have been unable to avoid confrontation. I wouldn't call that a weakness, Just something I am unable to control and some rather silly person wanting to test my ability unfortunately.

As I said.. there are always going to be things out of our control and we cant worry about those things until we find a solution to them.



posted on Feb, 5 2008 @ 01:21 AM
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Originally posted by Ox
[...]"Try to find the path of least resistance and use it without harming others. Live with intregrity and morality, not only with people but with all beings"


Attempting to live like this in a western society is virtually impossible when you take it to the finite detail of your existence... Striving toward this goal is the path of enlightenment none the less...



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